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Uno Network Charter School

Charter | K-11 | 5373 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

Teacher quality

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23 reviews of this school


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Posted October 24, 2014

This school is disturbingly TERRIBLE... I have a long list of things that this school never addressed and I brought to their attention repeatedly. Particularly since my child was an IEP student this is the worst network of schools that you can take your child to if he has an IEP... I recently found out from a teacher that works there that these students aren't getting their minutes as indicated and when they are receiving them some of these special ED teachers just have them sit & color or watch the IPAD or watch a movie on the portable DVD... how is that instructional?? but there was 1 or two teacher that I can say actually cared enough for my child and I appreciate their hard work and effort but I do feel they deserve to work in a better place that will compliment their hard work. And when I would call to speak with the director...(whom ever it is, because it was always someone different) this person would always be in meeting... and the UPPER administration (the higher end people) BULLY their teachers and staff very much so much that affects their teaching abilities... Do you really want your child in this school network... I transferred mine and doing sooo much better!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 3, 2014

My child is currently going to Uno Soccer academy. Before going to Uno he was attending a catholic school which we were so disappointed and very unhappy. My son has ADHD which in catholic school he was in 1st grade and was constantly bullied and harassed by the kids. He got 2teeth punched out of his mouth. My son was left in a corner eating lunch by himself for the whole year by the teacher. The teacher sent him to the office everyday to serve detention. The teacher never tried to help my son in any way, always complain about him constantly. My son was very active and in sports basketball and soccer for the year, but the kids would put him down and blame him for their losses in the games. his report card was all C's and D's. When the school year ended we enrolled him with Uno Soccer Academy. The teachers are great. It's a major difference with my son. All the kids love him. The teachers help him tremendously, he's in sports and doing great. his grades are A's and B's. He's a happy kid and so are we. Uno has really great discipline and awesome teachers. I just enrolled my daughter for kindergarten and I highly recommend this school to anyone. It changed my sons life for the better.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 21, 2013

My expierence with UNO. Has been the most degrading and humiliating experience ever! After being assure the problem would be address by a couple of staff members. I still had to deal with the same person. After leaving msgs for 2 weeks. Being down talk by more then 3 employees. Im sad to say although they have great teachers. The customer service lacks tremendously in manners & information. Even when UNO assigned that week. To provide enrollment & information. Not because I live in a low income neighborhood. Staff should feel they are doing families a favor.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 4, 2013

Their schools are slated for a turnaround ("restructuring") because they've failed to make AYP for 6 years now. Their CEO only has a B.A. in Communications from one of the lowest ranked universities in Illinois but he sure does pay himself a ton of money (more than the Mayor of Chicago) to run these failing schools. They also close the school on election day and try to bully the parents into voting a certain way. These schools go from bad to worse - yes they have flashy buildings - but the organization, its management, and its education outcomes stink! Don't put your kids in these schools as it's just a money making machine for local politicians and their cronies.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 17, 2012

I am currently a senior at UNO- Garcia High school. I am thankful for my parents to have ever helped me apply to this high school! I know that if I were to have gone to another community high school, like Curie or Kelly, I'd probably be going through the wrong path. Yes, this school is strict but I grew to learn that it was for my well-being. This high schools targets to give the students the best education while feeling safe. They succeed in doing both. Throughout my three years, this year being four, in this high school, I can honestly say there hasn't been a case in which one of my colleagues or I have felt unsafe.The education is excellent. The teachers spend their time on the students more than themselves. The Archer Heights neighborhood is not dangerous. In addition, I had the opportunity to travel to China during my spring break. That once in a lifetime experience opened my eyes to my future. I now know that I want to study Mandarin further, and one day, use my knowledge to become someone. All in all, I highly recommend any student to go to this school! Special thanks to all UNO faculty for their hard work and commitment in helping students, like me, prepare for our future!


Posted November 15, 2011

Bully Treachers. Director has no control over Teachers. Director is "new at this" and mistakes are "part of the learning process. Dont send your child here
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 27, 2011

UNO has about 10 different campuses, and while they each have to adhere to certain rules and procedures set down by the main offices, each also has its own local leadership, its own staff, and its own strengths and weaknesses. Don't judge any one school by anything that happens at any other.


Posted February 25, 2011

i want to go to this school its the school of my dreams i love UNO


Posted December 21, 2010

I cannot speak for anyone else, but this is my experience of working for the UNO Charter Organization. I am nervous they will find out who this is; however, I would like want to know this information if I were looking for the best school for my child. As a teacher of 11 years & a member of the 5 member leadership team, I was ASTOUNDED by the inner workings of the organization. The focus is on image alone. There are so many injustices I could list. For example, after Katrina, many first generation Hispanics moved into the area for work. Esperanza opened its doors to that population which is wonderful! However, with about 200 students being Spanish-speakers, only 1 English Language Specialist was employed. Few teachers were bilingual, so many students sat in classrooms for 8 hours a day without assistance. In the 3 years that Esperanza was under UNO's management, there were 4 directors. From what I understand, as each one would voice opposition, they were let go. I can assure you if you visit an UNO school, the students will be dressed nicely, and there will be greeters who give you a scripted greeting, but I extremely bothered by how we underserved our students.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted September 27, 2010

My children both go to Carlos Fuentes. My daughter was fortunate to have Mr. Malone as a teacher in 8th grade. She still talks about him even though she is high school now. She reads more than she did before and he always kept in touch with me about the good and the bad. My daughter finally felt encouraged to do good in school. She also talks about the way he talked about his wife with much respect and love. It is too bad that my son could not be in his class.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 25, 2010

Wihthin the UNO network of charter schools, Carlos Fuentes is one of the best, if not the best. It represents what Ray Budde (the man who originated the idea of charter schools in the United States) envisioned charter schools to be - institutions that demand the highest academic and behavioral standard from its student body. If your child is fortunate enough to attend Carlos Fuentes, he or she will receive a private school caliber experience. The highly competent no-nonsense faculty is run by a highly competent no-nonsense Director: Mr.Denneen. Carlos Fuentes sits beside a church; located in a safe cozy region, sequestered from mainline traffic on all sides, and surrounded by single family homes and two-flats. The upkeep of the landscaping is fantastic, and the janitorial staff does a superb job of keeping the school spotless. Children are dismissed in a secure and orderly fashion. Carlos Fuentes is a jewel.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 26, 2009

I strongely feel uno has strong leadership towards the goal they will achieve. Sometimes parents need more involvment with their child's education invest in your kid, 7 parents those are the smart parents they are present an you worry about how many are here be the leader uno wants you to be,( that leader make something happen with our latino education.) go UNO!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 23, 2009

The teachers at UNO are all full hearted dedicated to what they do, and believe in what the children and what they can accomplish. Having this alternative has truly been a blessing for my family. The UNO dedication that the teachers have and supportive encouraging parents is truly the recipe for a successful child s mind!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 19, 2009

I believe this school needs to close down my child has only been set behind instead of improving. The school is not a great school especially if you have an intelligent child this school just hinders the child not help them advanced not a school to choose
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 23, 2009

I am very disappointed with this school they think they are helping the students but no sir they are horrible thier extra activites are really nothing to brag about either close this school. I will never recommend this school to anyone absolutly not a great disapointment
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 17, 2009

These are not accurate facts. For one the UNO Charter schools is a network. Each campus is different. Some have good leadership, some have mediocre, some have bad. That is a direct reflection of the upper management. These schools do not pace emphasis on major aspects of a child's education. Research has shown that class size is a domineering factor when it comes to learning. This network claims that they can do just fine with large class sizes. Yes, this may be a better alternative to a neighborhood school in the city of Chicago, but it does say something about the education system as a whole in the city. This is just one example of how this Charter 'Network' does not meet the needs of students or parents. The list could go on and on. I do not offer an alternative but to say that each school should be evaluated.


Posted April 28, 2008

I cannot say enough about the great teachers at Carlos Fuentes. My daughter has grown by leaps and bounds under the guidance of her great teachers, Ms. Fires and Ms. Thalken! A big thank you to the both of them!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 25, 2008

Currently my children are attending Carlos Fuentes Charter School and I can not express how happy I am. Both my boys age 7 and 10 have improved greatly. I love the staff and love the structure they implement. Communication has been a great part of this through email/phone. My children have not only raised grades they have made new friends they love the teachers and are very happy to be part of UNO Carlos Fuentes Charter School. The Bustamante Family!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 27, 2007

My daughter has attended Paz for two years with the same teacher. Being a charter school, I thought that it would be different from public but it's not. Parent involvement does not exist because I have went to parent meetings and only 7 parents would show up. There should also be a dean for girls because the present dean cannot and doen't know how to handle situations that arises from the young ladies. Leadership stinks and every year new teachers appear. Paz has a long way to go in my opinoin.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 16, 2005

My son has attended Paz for 6 years. Each year there has been a shake up in leadership and staff. Students only have one year with a teacher, as the following year they will not be there. It makes it difficult for parents to have ongoing relationships with the staff to nurture the success of the children. Discipline is good at the school. Children are advised to treat school as their job, which I think is goood.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
77%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
58%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
82%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
62%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
59%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
73%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
61%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
77%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
75%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
80%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
71%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
72%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
81%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
84%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students43%
Female41%
Male46%
Black25%
Asiann/a
Hispanic44%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income42%
Not low income65%
Students with disabilities (IEP)14%
Students without disabilities45%
English language learners26%

Reading

All Students43%
Female50%
Male35%
Black33%
Asiann/a
Hispanic43%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income42%
Not low income69%
Students with disabilities (IEP)12%
Students without disabilities45%
English language learners24%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students48%
Female50%
Male46%
Black19%
Asiann/a
Hispanic48%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income47%
Not low income68%
Students with disabilities (IEP)16%
Students without disabilities51%
English language learners26%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students43%
Female49%
Male39%
Black19%
Asiann/a
Hispanic44%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income43%
Not low income55%
Students with disabilities (IEP)12%
Students without disabilities46%
English language learners9%
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students70%
Female70%
Male70%
Black63%
Asiann/a
Hispanic70%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income69%
Not low income86%
Students with disabilities (IEP)39%
Students without disabilities73%
English language learners47%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students48%
Female47%
Male48%
Black11%
Asiann/a
Hispanic49%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income47%
Not low income65%
Students with disabilities (IEP)18%
Students without disabilities50%
English language learners18%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students45%
Female49%
Male42%
Black26%
Asiann/a
Hispanic46%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income45%
Not low income65%
Students with disabilities (IEP)2%
Students without disabilities48%
English language learners8%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students54%
Female54%
Male54%
Black33%
Asiann/a
Hispanic55%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income54%
Not low income63%
Students with disabilities (IEP)8%
Students without disabilities59%
English language learners15%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students48%
Female52%
Male45%
Black33%
Asiann/a
Hispanic48%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income48%
Not low income53%
Students with disabilities (IEP)10%
Students without disabilities52%
English language learners12%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students61%
Female63%
Male58%
Black23%
Asiann/a
Hispanic61%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income61%
Not low income59%
Students with disabilities (IEP)16%
Students without disabilities65%
English language learners22%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students55%
Female60%
Male50%
Black46%
Asiann/a
Hispanic55%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income55%
Not low income65%
Students with disabilities (IEP)9%
Students without disabilities60%
English language learners10%
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students70%
Female74%
Male67%
Black92%
Asiann/a
Hispanic70%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income70%
Not low income77%
Students with disabilities (IEP)17%
Students without disabilities76%
English language learners27%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students58%
Female59%
Male57%
Black33%
Asiann/a
Hispanic59%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income59%
Not low income44%
Students with disabilities (IEP)20%
Students without disabilities63%
English language learners28%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students50%
Female51%
Male49%
Black46%
Asiann/a
Hispanic50%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income51%
Not low income38%
Students with disabilities (IEP)13%
Students without disabilities55%
English language learners10%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
49%

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
36%

2012

 
 
31%

2011

 
 
34%

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 49% in 2013.

2013

 
 
32%

2012

 
 
33%

2011

 
 
31%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Prairie State Achievement Examination (PSAE) to test students in grade 11 in reading, math and science. The PSAE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students42%
Female41%
Male45%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic41%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income43%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)6%
Students without disabilities47%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students36%
Female38%
Male34%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic35%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income37%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)18%
Students without disabilities38%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students32%
Female27%
Male39%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic31%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income31%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)0%
Students without disabilities35%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Prairie State Achievement Examination (PSAE) to test students in grade 11 in reading, math and science. The PSAE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Average

Test score rating
Student growth rating
College readiness rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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District
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Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

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District
State
1
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10

Math growth at this school

Average

Reading growth at this school

Average


College readiness rating 20133What's this?

College readiness rating combines this high school's graduation rates with data about college entrance exams, both of which are indicators of how well schools are preparing students for success in college and beyond.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
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8
9
10

Average ACT score

19

Graduation rate

95%


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

3 This rating is based on composite ACT scores and four-year adjusted graduation rates from 2012-13.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 95% 24%
Black 2% 18%
Two or more races 2% 3%
White 1% 51%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 4%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Female 48%N/A49%
Male 52%N/A51%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

Let your school shine!

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and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Martin Masterson

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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2317 West 23rd Place
Chicago, IL 60608
Phone: (312) 432-6301

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