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GreatSchools Rating

Locke A Elementary Charter Academy

Charter | PK-8 | 588 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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Parent involvement

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17 reviews of this school


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Posted August 1, 2013

My child has been at alain locke for a few weeks now and she loves going everyday. She loves her teachers and is learning a structured environment. I am eager to see how this year progresses.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2010

Both of my daughters attend, this is the only school they have ever attended they have both been here since they were 3. They are now 9 and 4. This is an excellent school, the staff is wonderful. We love it !there is a difference here. I have moved very far away but I will travel because it's worth it to me!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 21, 2009

I have an 4 yr old daughter that attend the pre-k program at locke. I had hear good things about this school and decided to apply. My daughter was blessed to get accpeted the first time we applied. I love that most of the kids that attend the upper grades started at pre-k. You slightly feel an family environment your home away from home.. I love the principal. She is tough as well as kind. She care about her job and it shows through the success of the students. The students that graduate form locke move on to prestigious schools. Every school have flaws; nevertheless I love this school and I hope it continue to thrive an educate our young.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 11, 2008

Love the school. The principal is tough but this is what our children need. The teachers are hard working. I would recommend the school to anyone.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 2, 2008

My son has attended since pre school he is currently in 2nd grade. I appreciate the focus on reading and so far he has had very attentive teachers and assistant teachers. I also appreciate the year round school philosophy. My only concern is that school administration makes changes that could affect parents and students without input from the parents. ALso information is not shared with families in a timely manner.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 3, 2008

Alain Locke charter academy is an awsome school . You ask how I know because I atened this school. I am in the 7th grade and i have been to this school every since in was in preschool. Ms.Jones and ms. Woodson have really changed this school and i'm thank them because my grades,test scores.... Have really improved.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 15, 2007

Since the very first year this school opened - 1999 - teacher attrition rate has been super high. Great parents and kids to work with. Supplies - ok. Administration - dismissive and cold. It's a business to them, and a poorly run one at that. Learning Swahili is fun and great only if the kids know how to read and write in their native English and have the energy at the end of the day to appreciate their skills.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted June 20, 2007

My child has attended Locke since pre-school and I have been pleased with her academic progress. We have been blessed with teachers and staff who seem genuinely concerned and committed. As much as I can appreciate the administration's vision, I take issue with the way parents are left out of the equation as it pertains to program/school issues and decisions. I think that the principal and assistant principal would do well to make some real effort to partner with parents and the community when making decisions about enrolled children and school programing issues. Our children need to be more than just 'globally competitive', they need to have balance and mental wellness. A 9 hour day and an hour or more of homework is academic overkill. Given an opportunity, we could be an asset. Learn to listen to and accept some of our input.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 13, 2007

My daughter has attended this school since pre-k, she will be in the 1st starting in July. I love the zero tolerance policy. The kindergarten program I though was to tough for such young children, however they had achieved everything but before them. The academic program is on target for what the children will need to be prepared for their High School years. Yes, the teachers could be a little more understanding to the parents who want to witness their children's involvement in class activities. However, some might cause a distraction to the daily process of studies. I feel the school has an excellent staff. I love the extended hours and year round schedule. Being a working mom, I need that peace of mind to my child is safe while I'm at work.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 16, 2006

This is an excellent school. The academics and extracurricular activities are also plentiful. In addition they also teach numerous foreign languages such as French, Spanish, and Japanese to name a few. I also like the zero tolerence policy which ensures my children will be around well behaved children, who will not be allowed to behave in an inappropriate manner, which my children may mimick at such an impressionable age.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 6, 2006

Academics are good,extracurricular activities open, Problem is zero tolerance principal
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 19, 2005

As a former teacher, I find it amazing that this school is still in existence. It is thriving on propaganda (teaching to tests) and a board of directors who are out of touch with the teachers' true perspectives of the school's poor leadership. A new crop of teachers come and go each year because they realize the principal and asst. principal really have no leadership skills, too opinionated to listen to teachers'suggestions and concerns, and are pushing for the school day to end at five although the teachers realize that this is not conducive to the needs of the students nor does it allow for them comprehensive planning time or to collaborate .Students are too tired to do homework after 5. Teachers are too exausted to grade a paper or even reflect on the day's activities. No one cares to look into why we flee? We'll tell you. Just ask why!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted September 26, 2005

This is a very good school they care about your childs success and lead by example
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 4, 2005

Alain Locke is one of the best schools in the inner city area. The teachers really care about the children. My son's teacher was always accessible. During open house, he provided all parents with a home number. Classrooms also have phones in each class. The school emphasizes on Reading and Math in which my son does well in. He is in the fifth grade and on his ITBS test he received 7.5 in reading and in Math he received 9.1 (99%)! What I most enjoy is the zero tolerance policy. It makes me feel good that my child is not going to school with unruly children. The majority of the parents are very involved in the education of their children. There are daily enrichment programs in which the children learn art, music, other languages, and sports. I'm glad Alain Locke gave my son a competitive edge that is needed for college!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 30, 2005

I feel this is a very good school. My soon has excelled in reading and math. I really like the zero tolerance rule because it will let the child learn from a early age to be responsible for their actions. I really feel that the school have excellent teachers who really work hard to teach our children in this poor economic area. The children love the extracurricular activities in the various clubs. Alain Locke has a very good basketball team, band and art club. `Parent involvement is excellent. The parents come out for report card pick-up, and various enrichment programs held through out the year. I love the extend hours, because I am a working parent. The doors open at 8:00 and close at 5:00 p.m. I love that the children get out in the middle of July. Go ALCA allstars.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 15, 2004

I feel like the school is shuting me out of my kids life when it comes to wanting to visit one of my children class room. Why is it that I'm always told to set up a conference with the teacher. I just want to observe what my child is learning. I have the right to come and do that. I don't want them to know all the time, so they can put on a show like they are really all together. They need to stop yelling at people children and calling them out negative names. Adults need to remember that kids have feeling to, and adults wouldn't like it if a kid said things to them like that. Adults would say the kid doesn't have any manners. Words do hurt some kids and lower a kids self-esteem.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 31, 2003

The zero tolerance policy is so severly strict that it does not accomodate for the developmental levels of the children. This creates a problem when behaviors that children should be assisted in developing through, result instead in repeated disciplinary actions (detentions/suspensions). This occurs with children as young as age 5. The staff is inaccessible to parents, and phone messages are not responded to unless there is a problem with the child(ren). Parents who ask questions and question the policies of the school are made to feel that they, as well as their child(ren), are unwelcome. Parent council meetings are not advertised for all parents and classroom parent representatives are selected by school administrators/staff, and not the parents of the classroom. The curriculum and enrichment activities are however innovative and effective. The children are learning and encouraged to excel academically. While I applaud the objective to promote excellence, at times I think it is an adult standard of excellence that the children are expected to live up to, and not that appropriate to their levels of development.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
92%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
84%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
92%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
79%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
69%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
87%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
86%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
81%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
98%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
85%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
82%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
97%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students67%
Female68%
Male66%
Black66%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income66%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities69%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students63%
Female73%
Male50%
Black63%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income63%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities66%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students69%
Female82%
Male57%
Black68%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income67%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)30%
Students without disabilities77%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students62%
Female75%
Male50%
Black61%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income60%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)40%
Students without disabilities67%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students84%
Female86%
Male83%
Black84%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income83%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities90%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students68%
Female71%
Male63%
Black68%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income72%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities73%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students75%
Female75%
Male75%
Black75%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income75%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities81%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students68%
Female74%
Male61%
Black68%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income68%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities74%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students68%
Female61%
Male78%
Black68%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income68%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities74%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students68%
Female65%
Male71%
Black70%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income68%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities70%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students71%
Female60%
Male86%
Black70%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income71%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities73%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students82%
Female75%
Male93%
Black82%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income81%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities85%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students76%
Female83%
Male69%
Black74%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income74%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities82%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students76%
Female87%
Male63%
Black74%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income74%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities82%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Above average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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This school
District
State
1
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3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Math growth at this school

Above average

Reading growth at this school

Above average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 98% 18%
Hispanic 1% 24%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 4%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Two or more races 0% 3%
White 0% 51%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Female 53%N/A49%
Male 47%N/A51%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Patrick Love

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
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3141 West Jackson Boulevard
Chicago, IL 60612
Phone: (773) 265-7232

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