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GreatSchools Rating

Passages Elementary Charter School

Charter | PK-8 | 426 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 3 ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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31 reviews of this school


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Posted June 24, 2014

Very disappointed with Passages school. My children complained all year, so they will not be returning. The administration is horrible and they lack knowledge, personality and problem solving skills. Need better leadership besides a new principal.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 23, 2014

I used to love passages and only kept my son and daughter there this year because if all day kindergarten. There has been continual turn over of administration as well as excellent teachers over the past 5years. The kids are having to constantly adjust to different rules which are never consistent. For a NPO they seem to be charging for everything including detentions. This year will be their third New principal and disciplinary dean within the last 5yrs as well as third or forth gym teacher and art teacher. Other teachers also change quickly. The kindergarten teacher have 0 patience to deal with the 5 and 6yr olds that are coming into their own personalities. As a parent i would have to call the school to find out what was going on because all information was given out so last minute no one had time to prepare including picture day which this year we found out the day before. They have no parent teacher group and don't seem to care much about parent involvement unless its financial. I was all for passages a few years ago but have pulled my kids this year and enrolled them in private school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 28, 2014

I like this school; because I always receive updated information regarding enrollment;working for a Head Start program. Parent are looking for a full-day Kindergarten. Passage Charter School send me monthly email about theirs enrollment progress.


Posted June 17, 2013

Passages USED to be a great school, emphasis on the USED. Passages has attracted some really great teachers over the years, and has lost some really great teachers, which really has impacted the quality of education students get at the school. The reasons teachers leave is - lack of support from administration. In fact, the principal sits in her office the entire day most of the time when she is there. When she's not there, she's "working from home." - the team leaders aren't qualified to be in the positions they are in and have no idea what it means to teach the grades they supposedly are in charge of - the pay for teachers is the BOTTOM OF THE BARREL I really enjoyed teaching here for a while, but this past year in particular they are hiring some really poor teachers and the teachers (who actually work with your students) have very little say in what goes in in the school. This school is better than some in the vicinity, but don't expect that the teachers your child has one year will be there the next year. Teachers are not appreciated at this school, which you should be aware of. Lack of teacher appreciation = poor morale = low quality education for your child.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted December 12, 2012

This is a great school. Very concerned, motivating staff & teachers. Children come in on all different academic levels making it very challenging for all, but they all are committed to the success of students. Excellent teachers. Challenging academic programs. Motivating teacher aide. Great teacher to student ratio. Very hard working staff. excellent!


Posted August 12, 2012

I transfered my child to Passages to escape the bullies from his other school. I found the school and its staff to be nice and appear to want to help. Since being at Passages, my son gets out of too early on Wednesdays and 11 am seems every other week. Some weeks he hardly is given homework. Those are my grips.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 13, 2011

This school is unacceptable. Check their test scores. We've stayed as long as we could, and tolerated as much as we could stomach. Parent/Teacher involvement is not valued, which explains why a mass exodus of students and teachers abandoned Passages for better options elsewhere. A lot of lip service and lack of accountability on behalf of the administration and their proprietors, Asian Human Services and management company, American Quality Schools. This school refuses to engage and involve eager students, parents and teachers. They are more concerned with how much money they can obtain from the state for each student than investing in highly-needed technology and individualized curriculum for all students. No incentive for 'better than average' students. The school is in dire need of responsible and accountable professionals to take ownership of THEIR children's education. Anywhere else is better than here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 3, 2011

I gave the school a lower grade because of the attitude of the administration towards kids that are above average. Nothing is being done to keep the smart kids in this school. I would say it's OK to keep your child in school for the 1st. and 2nd. grade but after...move on. There are no programs designed to encourage kids that are above their grade level so after these kids are gone, you are left with average and below average, which explains the bad test scores. I am in the position where I will regretfully move on because my kid is bored as hell in school and all of his friends will be gone. As far as parent's involvement, there isn't any and while this is a very diverse school, it's also very segregated.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 1, 2010

Passages is the hidden gem on the northside! Superinvolved teacher & parents who go above & beyond expectations are what makes our school great.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 26, 2010

This school is a true gem in the public school system. The teaching philosophy is great, focusing on reading texts and writing responses as opposed to memorization and regurgitation. They are the only CPS school I know of that administers the NWEA test to truly gauge their performance. (and the scores are great!) The parents I know with students needing an IEP are very happy with the services at the school. I am gettin my Master's in special education and have done a few observation exercises here and the methods employed are on par wit hthe best practices taught in Universities today. The transition to the new building and school management team hit bump last year, but I disagree wholeheartedly with the review stating this new team is anything but excellent. AQS consistently produces the city's top performing charter schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 28, 2010

This is my second year teaching at Passages and unfortunately, I'll be moving at the end of the year. In my 2 years at Passages, we've been through good times and bad, but I never felt alone in my struggles. My Administration is supportive and encouraging, my fellow teachers are the most dedicated and inspiring I've ever seen, and the students are unique and encourage me to bring my best each and every day. If you're looking for a school where teachers are always on the look out for new and exciting educational opportunities, then this is the place for you. A community where grant writing and professional development are valued, and personal differences are celebrated- that's what makes Passages great!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted March 4, 2010

There are better choices in the neighborhood. Passages does not offer a lot of the extra-curricular activities like most Chicago Public Schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 3, 2010

I love this school. My child is very happy and he is learning a lot. The teachers are great and very enthusiastic. They really care about the students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 4, 2010

As a teacher at Passages, I am so pleased with the community we have been able to build. Last year was definitely a struggle due to problems with our building and adjusting to change, but I am so proud to work with so many enthusiastic teachers and families (we've all worked so hard!). In addition, I love that I have kids from 10 different countries speaking 12 different languages...we are truly living Dr. King's dream. I can't speak for other classrooms, but I am proud that my kids are thriving both academically and socially. I welcome all families to come visit us :)
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted December 6, 2009

I am a teacher at Passages, and I am sad to see some of these comments. This year we have all worked hard to ensure that each child is getting the best education in the city. As the Teacher President of the Parent Teacher group, I am disappointed that many parents are not involved. As with many things, it is easier to sit back and complain instead of getting involved to bring positive change. It is hurtful to see parents that want to transfer their children, but please first speak to the principal and maybe she can fix the situation.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted November 26, 2009

I am an 'old parent' that has stuck around, last year was just terrible but I thought this year would be better with a different principal. Boy was I wrong! The new disiplinarian is beyond awful. The children are treated like criminals. And the administration seems so hard on the teachers. The teachers always look tired. I am thinking that during this break, we will finally have to move our child elsewhere. I am just fed up, angry and dissapointed.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 19, 2009

A third administration is three years is quite a bit. But, the quality teachers have stayed and are still providing our students with a great education. Teachers understand what each individual child needs and provide a tailored curriculum for each child. This is why I have seen my daughter grow so much at Passages. If you are looking for a high quality education, where all members of the school community will know who you and your student are, this is the place.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 2, 2009

The quality of education and culture of the school has decreased since the new administration came in this school year. My child has had three different teachers this year, and the parents did not receive one letter from the principal (or teacher) informing us of this change. I found out through other parents. The Principal's communication and leadership is very poor, and they are not welcoming of parents. The hiring of staff is also poor, teachers seem to be in-experienced (probably first year/second year teachers in most cases). I am very disappointed with the quality of education and lack of communication from the administration. This school falls below average compared to other charter or elementary schools throughout the city. I think the school will have a chance for improvement with with new administration and experienced/diverse teachers. I would not recommend Passages, and will be transferring my child next year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 9, 2009

Passages has had continuous and prosperous growth! As a new parent with work and a school schedule, I have been able to turn to Passages for support and have received an adequate learning environment for my children. I have seen initiative to continue to help working parents by providing afterschool programs and activities. At passages my two children as well as my niece, are receiving far better education that I would be able to afford. The individual help that children receive is far more than I expected. The school working together with other institutions has allowed it to give families various forms of assistance in different areas. Because the school only offers Pre-k to 5th grade, it is able to concentrate on those needs of individual growth more than anything else!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 4, 2009

I am a new parent at passages and I love it. The teachers put in just as much work in to helping my son that I do. The school works together with the parents to come up with solutions to problems. I am moving and am staying close to Passages just so my son can continue to receive the best education that he can.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
71%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
32%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
80%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
59%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
57%

2010

 
 
56%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
74%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
35%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
61%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
74%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
74%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students56%
Female65%
Male48%
Black52%
Asiann/a
Hispanic40%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income56%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities65%
English language learners23%

Reading

All Students66%
Female70%
Male63%
Black62%
Asiann/a
Hispanic50%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income66%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities77%
English language learners17%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students72%
Female85%
Male61%
Black64%
Asian75%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income70%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities74%
English language learners40%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students52%
Female65%
Male40%
Black50%
Asian33%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income47%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities54%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students74%
Female85%
Male65%
Black68%
Asian75%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income72%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities75%
English language learners40%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students39%
Female25%
Male56%
Black38%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income41%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities44%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students35%
Female30%
Male43%
Black24%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income34%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities40%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students81%
Female82%
Male79%
Black75%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income83%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities80%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students68%
Female71%
Male64%
Black60%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income66%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities70%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students62%
Female61%
Male63%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income55%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities66%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students51%
Female56%
Male47%
Black42%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income52%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities57%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students76%
Female83%
Male68%
Black75%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income74%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities78%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students56%
Female75%
Male38%
Black38%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income56%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities67%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students63%
Female75%
Male50%
Black56%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income63%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities79%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

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Math growth at this school

Average

Reading growth at this school

Average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 54% 18%
Hispanic 17% 24%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 15% 4%
Two or more races 7% 3%
White 6% 51%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Female 49%N/A49%
Male 51%N/A51%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Nicole Feinberg

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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1643 West Bryn Mawr Avenue
Chicago, IL 60660
Phone: (773) 433-3530

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