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GreatSchools Rating

Galapagos Elementary Charter School

Charter | K-8 | 350 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 7 ratings
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

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12 reviews of this school


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Posted July 31, 2013

I have had great experiences with Galapagos. The principal, Ms. Jackson is also willing to speak with me and she is amazing with the kids. I think the school gets better every year. This year the 8th graders went to Washington DC. I don't know many schools on the west side where the staff are willing to spend their time to take the kids on a trip like this one. Yeah, I like this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 9, 2013

Galapagos has gotten so much better. They got teachers who work hard and a principal that does too. They got private tutoring for my baby and they started a basketball team and send the kids to Washington. I am very happy with the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 10, 2012

The complexity of a school that grapples between tension and distress. Tension between teachers and administration that overloads their teachers with unnecessary work, documents, and software programs. Distress of overworked teachers and overworked staff members. But, more importantly, distress of children who are made to be silent and sit with their hands in their lap for almost the entirety of their school day. Distress of children who do not have time to release physical energy, run around a playground, paint a picture, or sing songs in music class. Stop trying to educate your students from the waist up and start educating their entire being. It will yield results. Instead of using the entirety of other education models, look to your own reality, Galapagos. Your kids, your teachers, your successes, and your failures. And begin to develop innovative solutions to your own problems. Not KIPP's problems, or Uncommon School's problems. Do whatever you can to make your teachers happy. Because they are who, in fact, are making change in the classroom. And they will decide if they want to come back next year, which hasn't been a reality in your past.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted October 8, 2012

This is my son first year of school he is in kindergarten. I have had nothing but a wonderful experience so far with this school. I like the fact that before school started they had a meet in greet so we both felt comfortable on the first day. plus he's learning spanish which he really injoys. My only complaint is the school supply list is ridiculous for a kindergartener and the fact that they recieved these things and I have yet to see my child use any he brought everything on the list and it's beening used by only God knows who because he has none of the things in his desk. when I asked about it they said that all the kids share the supplies. feel they should ask if you wanted to donate $40.00 worth of supplies to the school. but other then that so far so good. Teacher's and staff has been very nice and there open door policy is wonderful and I also love the weekly assesments letting me know excatly whats he's mastering and what he needs help on.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 4, 2012

My son comes home every night saying he likes school. He likes his teachers. He feels like his teachers like him and that they teach well. He's been in 16 different schools and he's only said that he has liked 1---Galapagos.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 21, 2012

I disagree with the last two reviews. I have seen great things happening at this school over the years. The school works really hard with the students and it shows. The work I have seen some of the kids do surpasses that of what manny of the high school kids in the area do. When you talk to a Galapagos kid they become immediately animated about their future and the fact that they will go to college. This is not a sentiment shared by neighborhood kids who go to other schools in the area.


Posted June 28, 2012

I'm glad to see this review. I'm a community member (live on the block)and never have I been approached to get involved. When this school opened, I was working in a small alternative school and knew that I didn't want my kids to be involved in a chaotic dysfunctional mess. We have had problems with parents driving down the wrong way on a one way street to drop their kids off; the "garden" looks like it ran out of funds and by the way I don't think they involved the community one bit. We have been active in the neighborhood with kids that go to this school and I agree they aren't flexible, they wouldn't let a student go to football practice! thanks for the confirmation.


Posted June 27, 2012

The instructors at this school go above and beyond. They truly care about the students. Unfortunately, most of the administrative staff create a very poisonous and negative environment for both teachers and students. Although teacher retention was somewhat higher this school year, high numbers of teachers are either leaving or were fired. They have a much higher than average turnover rate, but the admin does not want to really reconsider their approach or evaluate just why teachers choose to leave. It's also an incredibly high stress environment for new teachers. I do not recommend working here if you are a first or second year teacher. It's too much to handle. Also, admin constantly try to reinvent the wheel. There's no actual evolution of education, as they claim. It's just a chaotic, dysfunctional mess. There also appears to be a bit of a power struggle between certain members of the admin staff, and teachers get caught in between.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted February 28, 2012

I have worked a many schools and Galapagos is the only school that I've worked at in which all of the adults in the building seem to have the interest of the kids at the forefront. I honestly believe that the school wants every student or as we at Galapagos say "scholar" to succeed and attend college. I cannot say that about other places I have worked.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted September 24, 2011

This school is more concerned about money than the success of students. The teachers are told that the students shouldn't be absent because every day they are gone the state pays Galapagos less money. The teachers really care, and are some of the best you can find, but administration is a problem. Most teachers leave because they are treated with constant disrespect, and are not compensated fairly for their skills. Six teachers have already left this year and it's not even October. Do not send your child here or get a job here.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted July 7, 2011

I agree with the previous review. The instructors at the school are top notch; the administration is not. DO NOT send your child here or try to get a job at this school. The 2010-2011 school year saw 70% of the instructors leave within the year.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted May 23, 2011

Galapagos Charter School does not have the best interests of the scholars in mind. They do not respect their teachers and have a completely new staff each year.
—Submitted by a teacher


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
31%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
77%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
31%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
54%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
65%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
55%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
57%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
59%

2010

 
 
51%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
34%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
61%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
37%

2012

 
 
51%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
54%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
34%

2012

 
 
61%

2011

 
 
62%

2010

 
 
43%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
26%

2012

 
 
55%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
68%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
63%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
38%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
85%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
74%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
32%

2012

 
 
48%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
63%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
38%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students31%
Female38%
Male22%
Black27%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income29%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities33%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students31%
Female43%
Male17%
Black27%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income29%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities33%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students42%
Female57%
Male25%
Black42%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income41%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities47%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students39%
Female57%
Male20%
Black39%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income39%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities45%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students66%
Female86%
Male45%
Black66%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income64%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities75%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students34%
Female41%
Male29%
Black34%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income35%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities35%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students37%
Female35%
Male38%
Black37%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income38%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities38%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students34%
Female29%
Male41%
Black31%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income34%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities37%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students26%
Female29%
Male24%
Black20%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income26%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities29%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students41%
Female32%
Male50%
Black41%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income35%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities47%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students38%
Female42%
Male33%
Black38%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income32%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities44%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students62%
Female53%
Male72%
Black62%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income59%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities66%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students32%
Female42%
Male20%
Black33%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income32%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities38%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students38%
Female58%
Male13%
Black36%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income39%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities45%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2011-2012 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 99% 18%
Hispanic 1% 23%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Asian 0% 4%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Two or more races 0% 3%
White 0% 51%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Tasha Gray

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

To learn more about enrolling, please call the school.
 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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3814 West Iowa Street
Chicago, IL 60651
Phone: (773) 384-9400

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