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GreatSchools Rating

Bell Elementary School

Public | PK-8 | 794 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 4 ratings
2013:
Based on 6 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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56 reviews of this school


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Posted September 3, 2014

I am a 7th grader in the options department at Bell School and I am honestly very happy where I am. Although I do think that the new principal is not as included and well rounded as the old one, I still find Bell to be such an including and wonderful school. I've been here since I was in kindergarten and I have made great connections with the student and the teachers. I would like to make a shoutout to the seventh grade options teacher (Mr. Klein) I think that he has prepared many students to be able to reach their full potential and get ready for high school which is an extremely helpful pro to Bell. The academics are really good for what I am aware of and some of the reviews saying that they aren't, are not really looking at all of the different view points and really looking at the work that their kid is given.


Posted May 13, 2014

I think this school has been a wonderful experience for my children! We moved in district just to go here and have not regretted it one second. It is a great community. The teachers are, on the most part, wonderful and caring and my children are thriving in their academic journey here. We have never experienced any bullying or elitist teaching staff as some have reported. I volunteer often in the school and feel I have a great rapport with the staff. They school encourages parent participation and volunteerism, a part that makes is so great.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 9, 2014

If you scratch the surface of the hype surrounding this school, you will discover that all that glitters is not gold. I have had 2 kids at this school for the last 6 years and the truth is that this is the most over-rated school in Chicago. The environment is elitist and entitled. Bullying is rampant and not addressed. The "wonderful" education is mediocre at best. Unless you plan on donating a lot of money or spending hours volunteering, forget about your child being treated as anything more than a statistic. While there may be a few teachers who are wonderful, they are the minority and most teachers are extremely passive-aggressive in their attitudes towards the students especially in the upper grades. I moved to the neighborhood specifically for this school and wish I had stayed where we were. . There are a lot of other parents who feel the same way but are afraid to say anything for fear of repercussions.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 17, 2014

I do not recommend this school for anyone who has a deaf child. The principal is very inexperienced and is just worried about the how everything looks to impress outsiders. They confuse children and families.


Posted September 26, 2013

I am happy that my daughter, who is now in 8th grade, is able to attend and graduate from Bell. It has been mostly a great experience - good teachers, parental involvement, and culturally diverse.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 29, 2013

With three different "schools" within the same building, Bell has an extremely diverse student population. Neighborhood, gifted and deaf/hard of hearing children have separate curricula but the faculty and administration are extremely creative in finding ways for the children to interact. On top of that, top notch staff, creative and dedicated teachers and an extremely strong parent organization have made Bell a consistently top ranked school not only within the Chicago Public school system but also the state. Academics, sports, fine arts, after school programming and more make this a welcoming school and deliver a great education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 19, 2013

Bell school is wonderful. My son has been there for two years and loves it. He has an IEP and we were very concerned about a school appropriately providing for his learning needs (after being at other good school, just to be disappointed). Not the case at this school. The community is wonderful and very supportive to all students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 5, 2013

I am currently an 5th grade student at Bell School and I am frustrated with all "spirit" and festivals. In my opinion, they don't really have a real effect on the students' positive thinking and are a complete waste of time. I get that the staff is trying to promote kindness and acceptance, but, really, if they want us to treat each other better, they should work on THEIR leadership skills. I do realize that only we as students can stop bullying and other issues, but, it's really their job to educate us and guide us. With all the "fun" events right now, I think they are taking this issue too forcefully. You can't really "party away" bullying and I think they should take a softer approach towards this issue. Instead of going about into lalaland and planning not-so-creative events, they should listen to the people who are actually being bullied. I just don't think they truly understand what's happening backstage in OUR reality.


Posted April 8, 2013

I am currently an 8th grade student in the Bell school options department, and my experience with bell school has been, on a whole, very positive. I have had some issues with the new principle and slew of new hires - we had two 1st year teachers in three years, both of which had to completely rewrite a curriculum for themselves, leading to a good deal of organizational issues and frustration. (especially considering how wonderful the teachers we would have had were). However, the community involvement, many of the teachers, and the academic and after school opportunities are exceptional and I, as well as my classmates, are prepared for high school next year.


Posted January 29, 2013

We have been at Bell (1st grade) for 4 months now and find it to be an exceptional school. We would love to get our daughter into the Options program but if given the choice between an option program in another school and staying in Bell's neighborhood program, i believe we would make the choice to stay at Bell. The teachers, faculty and community are wonderful and our daughter is thriving.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 29, 2012

My son is in this school since 2011 and I am really happy to be a part of this school. Teachers are really really great. Their feedback is so helpful. Even Principle is so friendly and open to discuss anything. Good Education flow. Lots of helpful activities for Science, Maths and English. I must say its one of the best school. I took my daugher's admission also in this school ( Preschool), but somehow it not starting this year and we decided to let her go next year but will start with this school only. I do not have enough words but in short this is great school indeed.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 7, 2012

As a parent with two kids at Bell I can say the school is excellent. All of our teachers, past & present, have been outstanding & truly care. One of the best aspects of the school is the open attitude of the administration and the way they strongly encourage parent involvement. Teachers are easily accessible and available to answer questions. Their personal recommendations for my kids have been on target and obviously geared towards my kids unique learning style. Community involvement is strong as evidenced by Friends of Bell fundraising that generates substantial dollars each year. This allows the school to stay on top of the latest technology. I m always impressed by the regular flow of new computers and AV equipment thanks to these discretionary funds. The bottom line is my kids are thriving in every way because Bell really is as good as it s reputation.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 11, 2012

Things are changing at Bell and not necessarily for the better. The new principal is not being a leader so much as running away from parents. Parents are not welcome into her office as was the case with the old principal. I have yet to see her smile at anyone. When issues have been raised concerning new teachers or program changes barriers are put in place to keep the average parent out of the loop and forget about offering an opinion. As stated before - What does the options coordinator do? She just seems to be 1 more buffer between parents and the principal. She is definitely not an advocate for the program(kids or staff) she is 'coordinating.' Bell used to be ahead of it's time in the gifted program it offered. Now it seems to be stagnant and this is entiredly based on the lack of leadership from the top down. I hope someone in the admin sees this and starts to take the comments to heart.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 30, 2011

I am a student at bell School. I will be going into the 7th grade options class this year. For me, all my teachers have been great every year. They truly do care about how we are doing academically. The teachers I have had also seem to care about how we are doing emotionally, as well. The one complaint I do have is that the neighborhood and options program seem so segregated. It is rare that the options and neighborhood students will engage in activities together, even during recess. Also, the neighborhood kids all know each other, despite their being 4 different classes because the classes are mixed up every year. In addition, I believe our previous principal was outstanding. But I don't believe the assistant principal that took his place is living up to our previous principal.


Posted June 16, 2011

The education at Bell is good, not great as in some of the North Shore suburbs where I attended grade school, however, based on the attitudes of the faculty, you'd think Bell was the best school in the country. Some of the teachers are very elitist, yet immature in the way they deal with students. One teacher would embarrass students who were too poor to pay for expensive school trips, calling on them in class and asking why they think it is ok not to pay. Another teacher, when asked to write recommendation letters to selective enrollment high schools, would say negative things in his letters about the student or family, rather than just decline writing the letters altogether. There are many stories similar that I have heard over the few years that my children attended A.G. Bell. The lack of professionalism and passive aggressive behavior of faculty is appalling; especially for a school that prides itself on its supposed high level of inclusivity .
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 20, 2010

I am a student of Bell and I would have to say that the teacher are really good. I am in the 7th grade and all the 4 teachers really want you to do your best and succeed, and they help you with that. A down side to this school would be the gifted program and the deaf department. I know that the deaf kids need a little more help but some teacher(mainly specials teacher..gym, art, music, etc.) focus on them more than us. They favor the deaf kids. Also, the specials teachers favor the 'gifties'. It gets really frustrating sometimes! Overall, the school is really good and if you are debating on sending your child here, please do!


Posted October 13, 2010

I do too found out that after a great 1st grade in the Options program my child was learning less and getting bored in 2nd grade with the new teacher. She was not only new to the school but seems to be very new teaching and most likely not "advanced" kids. Was wondering why a more experienced teacher was not hired or they just hired her because she is a Bell alumna. Hardly any work or project to do at home and no word on what our child was learning. Last year principal did not want to do anything because it was his last year. If new principal does take care of the issue of getting qualified teacher, the program and therefore the school will go downhill. Parental involvement very strong.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 1, 2010

My child attends Bell's "gifted" program. I am not happy with the program. He had a brand new teacher last year that did not follow the wonderful curriculum set forth by the retiring teacher. The Options Program Coordinator (what the heck does this woman do?) did nothing to ensure the curriculum was continuous and to high standards. My son spent nearly two months studying The Wizard of Oz. Really. Now, he is expected to memorize the first 30 elements from the Periodic Table -- in order! His teacher spends much of the day disciplining the kids who get bored by her long lectures. Ditto problems with a new middle grade teacher whose curriculum is non-existent. This program is slip-sliding downhill, and no one is at the helm managing its demise. Word is the options coordinator lost interest in doing a good job when her daughter didn't get in.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 19, 2010

I love A.G. Bell school! The kids seem genuinely happy when you go there. The parents are warmly welcomed there-- and getting parents to be involved with their kids education is the best way to improve children's performance! Finally, the teachers want to teach----and not just the basics. The approach the WHOLE child. In addition to academics, they help develop the emotional aspects of the kids and get them involved in community volunteering and fundraisers. All of this results in a well-rounded student!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 2, 2010

With strong academics, social, and physical development of children, A. G. Bell School is the best school! Bell has it all!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
98%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
94%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
99%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
99%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
97%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
97%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
92%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
97%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
98%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
99%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students90%
Female92%
Male87%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic82%
Multiracial100%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Low income62%
Not low income93%
Students with disabilities (IEP)50%
Students without disabilities95%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students90%
Female94%
Male87%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic91%
Multiracial100%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Low income69%
Not low income93%
Students with disabilities (IEP)42%
Students without disabilities97%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students89%
Female90%
Male88%
Blackn/a
Asian85%
Hispanic83%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White93%
Low income64%
Not low income93%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities91%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students93%
Female95%
Male91%
Blackn/a
Asian92%
Hispanic89%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White93%
Low income79%
Not low income95%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities96%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students98%
Female100%
Male97%
Blackn/a
Asian100%
Hispanic95%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Low income100%
Not low income98%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities98%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students87%
Female91%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic82%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White91%
Low income75%
Not low income89%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities91%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students85%
Female89%
Male82%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic77%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White88%
Low income63%
Not low income89%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities91%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students89%
Female91%
Male88%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic87%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White88%
Low income75%
Not low income93%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities91%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students92%
Female96%
Male88%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic93%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income74%
Not low income96%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities95%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students88%
Female92%
Male81%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic71%
Multiracial100%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White88%
Low income58%
Not low income95%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities88%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students90%
Female96%
Male81%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic76%
Multiracial100%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income63%
Not low income96%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities91%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students98%
Female98%
Male98%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic91%
Multiracial100%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income90%
Not low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities98%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students96%
Female96%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White92%
Low income93%
Not low income96%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities99%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students99%
Female100%
Male97%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Low income93%
Not low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Above average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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District
State
1
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8
9
10

Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

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This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
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8
9
10

Math growth at this school

Above average

Reading growth at this school

Above average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 59% 51%
Hispanic 24% 24%
Two or more races 8% 3%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 5% 4%
Black 3% 18%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Assistant principal(s)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
PE instructor(s)
Security personnel
Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

School facilities
  • Computer lab

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Music room
Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing and written arts
  • Drama

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • American sign language
  • Chinese (Mandarin)

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • PE instructor(s)
School facilities
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Sandra Ann Caudill

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • American sign language
  • Chinese (Mandarin)

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • Security personnel
  • Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Transportation options
  • Accessible via public transportation
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Cafeteria
  • Computer lab
  • Gym
  • Internet access
  • Library
  • Music room
  • Playground
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Flag football
  • Soccer
  • Track
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Track
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing arts
  • Drama
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Apply now
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

3730 North Oakley Avenue
Chicago, IL 60618
Website: Click here
Phone: (773) 534-5150

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