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GreatSchools Rating

Black Magnet Elementary School

Public | K-8 | 470 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 4 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
No new ratings

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10 reviews of this school


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Posted October 30, 2013

My school is R. A. B Magnet. It is a great school and will provide your child with an terrific education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 24, 2013

My school is robert a black branch school. His yeachet is the best. He os inkindergarden and has developed well.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 8, 2013

My son attends robert a black branch school. His teacher Mrs Holloway is the bomb. They teach more to my chld than school. He is learning how to be a good and respectable child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 9, 2013

So you want the skinny? Black can be accurately described as one of the better "inner city" schools in the CPS system. However, the question remains do you want your child to have an "inner city" mentality.? The challenges we've experienced: classism amongst the students, discipline w/o communication, overcrowded classrooms and a lack of resources. These are issues you wouldn't experience in other neighborhoods, but the administrators deal with their reality as best as they can. I was excited to attend the school but have since become disillusioned with the quality of education and interaction we've received. We decided to continue the Selective Enrollment process to allow our child more diversity and accessibility to things that students at Poe, Lenart and other schools take for granted. Would I recommend Black? Yes....if you are short on options. I believe they care for their students, but they are dealing with difficult circumstances, and if your child needs more attention and nurturing than the other 32 children in the room...your best bet would be search elsewhere.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 29, 2012

I drive my son across Chicago to attend Black everyday, because the schools in my neighborhood do not offer what he will need to have a successful academic career. I admit--because of it's location, and the fact that there are so many other magnet schools to which we applied with better reputations--this school was not my first choice. However, we found ourselves stuck with one admission letter from Black, and we knew we were not doing another year at his neighborhood school. He has now been at Black for since 1st grade and is now in 3rd and we are extremely pleased. He has gone from being a self-concious, shy, unexcited student to become student of the month this year and completely in love with reading and math. He also loves the computer class. Despite the school not having a real gymnasium, he enjoys his P. E. class and looks forward to seeing all of his teachers daily. The school's principal is highly involved. Most of the staff is extremely friendly, open and engaging. Overall the students are respectful, disciplined and focused, with much credit due to not only the school's culture, but also the involvement and character of the parents. Black is doing a great job!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 16, 2010

I'm not impressed with this school. The best elementry schools are: Poe, Lenart, Skiner, Powell, Murray Black is horrible. :(
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 22, 2009

My son transferred from another magnet school and the principal and staff have really welcomed him with open arms. I'm so glad we made the change to a smaller school. My son loves RAB and so do I. The teachers really care and the kids are so polite and intelligent.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 27, 2008

I am really impressed with this school and I really like the staff they are so helpful and real easy to talk to and the teachers are very good as well,the children are intelligent and well behaved and they have alot of activities for the children to participate in.......I'd recommend this school for parents that want their children in a good enviorment and a great school !
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 29, 2006

Black has always had the reputation of exemplary instruction and programs. It does, however, lack extracurricular activities for the K-3 branch. Need more energy-channeling activities.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 9, 2004

Black Magnet is a great school with a caring faculty who place a real emphasis on learning and thinking critically. The teachers and principals create an environment conducive to advanced study while maintaining order through discipline tempered with genuine care and concern for the students. My child is treated and nurtured as a whole little person, and as such has wonderful self-esteem, pride, and confidence in her academic abilities. My child is constantly encouraged to excel and achieve goals, and to explore new territories, which she does, with the assurance that her teachers will be there to guide and instruct her. I am proud to say I also attended Black, and the same commitment to education and nurturing the whole child has continued as a lasting tradition.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
84%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
76%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
86%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
84%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
79%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
81%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
74%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
74%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
88%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
77%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
80%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
88%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
79%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students58%
Female59%
Male56%
Black58%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income59%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities63%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students61%
Female62%
Male60%
Black61%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income63%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities65%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students62%
Female65%
Male58%
Black62%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income61%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities63%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students60%
Female73%
Male46%
Black60%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income59%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities61%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students87%
Female88%
Male85%
Black87%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income86%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities86%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students59%
Female50%
Male67%
Black60%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income55%
Non-low income67%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities62%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students68%
Female69%
Male67%
Black67%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income69%
Non-low income67%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities72%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students39%
Female47%
Male26%
Black39%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income40%
Non-low income39%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities42%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students67%
Female69%
Male63%
Black67%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income68%
Non-low income62%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities71%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students63%
Female58%
Male67%
Black65%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income63%
Non-low income62%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities69%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students75%
Female81%
Male70%
Black78%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income74%
Non-low income77%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities82%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students89%
Female88%
Male90%
Black93%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income86%
Non-low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities96%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students42%
Female43%
Male41%
Black42%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income41%
Non-low income47%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities46%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students65%
Female60%
Male70%
Black65%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income62%
Non-low income73%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities69%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2011-2012 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 96% 18%
Two or more races 2% 3%
Hispanic 1% 23%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Asian 0% 4%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
White 0% 51%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

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What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Andrew N Mcintosh

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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9101 South Euclid Avenue
Chicago, IL 60617
Phone: (773) 535-6390

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