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GreatSchools Rating

Blaine Elementary School

Public | PK-8 | 901 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 9 ratings
2013:
Based on 8 ratings
2012:
Based on 10 ratings
2011:
Based on 8 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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89 reviews of this school


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Posted October 18, 2004

I used to go to this school since preschool until fifth grade. Now i go to Cleveland which is better in sports equipment.The principal should buy new sports equipment. They should add a cheerleading squad and flag football.and improve the uniforms.They should also have dance classes. Like they have in Cleveland.They should also prepare the eight graders for high school. For example swithching classes like they do in high school.I am now in eight grade at Cleveland school. Some students in seventh and eight grade take algebra and pre-algebra.Science fair should also start earlier. Here at cleveland we started science fair three weeks ago.Clearly the students will not survive in high school if they are not prepared. The stdents at cleveland start switching classes in fifth grade.This school also has no disciplin. They should serve detentions.All they get are mis-conduct reports. That does not do much.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 15, 2004

I feel that Mrs. Vaccarezza, along with the LSC and parent involvement, has done a tremendous job with turning test scores around and providing a safe and nurturing environment for all of the children Pre-K to 8th. My daughter is currently in Kindergarten and I am a very active parent. I am looking forward to the future growth under Mrs. Vaccarezza's term as the Principal. The new programs are phenomenal and the Tuition Based After School program has been much needed and is now much appreciated by children and parents, alike.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 5, 2004

I have the unique position of being both a parent of a child in a CPS school and a teacher in one. The whole 'lack of communication' issue is simply a system-wide one. CPS, in reality, does not usually deal with concerned and involved parents and are therefore woefully inept in dealing with them. For every parent or family that is involved, there are four that aren't, which leaves the bulk of kids' concerns on the system, which by any standards is overworked and overburdened. I absolutely love my daughter's 1st grade teacher--she is simply a wonderful teacher, but that has more to do with her own personal expectations of herself than the system's. I feel at this point the principal has done a great job, but needs to be replaced with someone more experienced with working with parents who are actually involved/committed. Amazing potential is there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 27, 2004

I've been an active parent at Blaine for two years now. I love Blaine because the faculty is dedicated, the student body is bright and diverse, and the parents are eager to be involved with the school's improvement. Overall the atmosphere here is down to earth and vibrant with change. Also, test scores seem to increase with each passing year. My one complaint so far is the lack of communication on all levels. Information concerning budget issues and how they affect the staff and curriculum at our school is virtually kept secret, LSC hasn't posted their minutes since October, parents aren't informed about SIPPAA mtgs until the day before they're scheduled. All this is very discouraging. The lack of communication seems to build walls between the schools' organizations, and walls between parents/teachers and teachers and administration. I think this communication must be improved in order for Blaine to improve.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 15, 2004

Blaine is a great school but the busing has been a real problem. My first child was eligible for busing since his K year but the office always discouraged us away. This has created a huge problem for our family.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 5, 2004

My two children go to Blaine. My daughter is in 2nd grade and my son in K. My wife and I are very active in the school. The faculty at Blaine is very responsive and open to parent concerns and ideas.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 18, 2004

My two children have attended Blaine for three years. Their teachers have been nurturing and stimulating, and I find the diversity of the student body a real plus. My son has wonderful friends from many different backgrounds. Before he started school, I had concerns over how he would do socially as he is incredibly nerdy; I feared he would be made fun of for doing well academically. This has not been the case, and he seems to have found a real home at Blaine. I am proud to be a part of Chicago Public Schools, and to be a part of Blaine.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 31, 2004

Blaine does not meet our standards. There is no leadership at the top. We transferred our daughter because she was not receiving a good quality education. She is now on the honor roll thanks to great teachers! Our daughter is happy at her new private school. The main reason for the transfer was because we felt that the principal and the staff had a 'I don't care attitude'. We complained to top public school officials and they had the same 'I don't care but I'm sorry attitude'. That is unacceptable. Many other parents transferred their children also, so it's definately not just one parent's concern. Please research your options carefully when considering Blaine for your children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 17, 2004

My children (2) have been attending Blaine since Kindergarten. There is not enough space here for me to express how happy my family and I are with the education and experiences that my children are receiving. I have visited other schools and I have not found a principal more dedicated to the students, than the principal at Blaine. We are very proud to support our city's public schools and we are very proud of Blaine.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
87%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
99%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
88%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
93%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
96%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
90%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
98%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
97%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
90%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
97%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
96%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
98%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students82%
Female81%
Male82%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic63%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income40%
Non-low income92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)58%
Students without disabilities85%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students94%
Female95%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic88%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Low income80%
Non-low income97%
Students with disabilities (IEP)75%
Students without disabilities97%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students90%
Female92%
Male89%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic88%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White91%
Low income76%
Non-low income95%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities95%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students89%
Female95%
Male83%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic92%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White91%
Low income82%
Non-low income91%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities92%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students99%
Female97%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic96%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Low income100%
Non-low income98%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students88%
Female83%
Male92%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic81%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White92%
Low income73%
Non-low income93%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities90%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students88%
Female89%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic83%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White96%
Low income76%
Non-low income92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities88%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students87%
Female87%
Male87%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic75%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Low income87%
Non-low income87%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities93%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students89%
Female93%
Male83%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic82%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income87%
Non-low income90%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities94%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students88%
Female84%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic79%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low income74%
Non-low income94%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities91%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students88%
Female87%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic82%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Low income72%
Non-low income94%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities91%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students93%
Female95%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic83%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income79%
Non-low income98%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities94%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students85%
Female88%
Male79%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic76%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low income65%
Non-low income93%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities91%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students85%
Female88%
Male79%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic71%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Low income65%
Non-low income93%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities91%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Above average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Math growth at this school

Above average

Reading growth at this school

Above average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 56% 51%
Hispanic 28% 24%
Two or more races 7% 3%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 4% 4%
Black 4% 18%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 0%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Assistant principal(s)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
PE instructor(s)
School psychologist
School social worker/counselors(s)
Speech and language therapist(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Special education / special needs

Staff resources available to students
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Music room
  • Performance stage
Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
  • Photography
Performing and written arts
  • Drama
  • Poetry

Language learning

Staff resources available to students
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
School facilities
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
School Leader's name
  • Troy Anthony Laraviere

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
  • Speech and language therapist(s)
Transportation options
  • Accessible via public transportation
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Auditorium
  • Cafeteria
  • Gym
  • Internet access
  • Library
  • Music room
  • Performance stage
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Cross country
  • Flag football
  • Soccer
Girls sports
  • Cheerleading
  • Cross country
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
  • Photography
Performing arts
  • Drama
  • Poetry
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Apply

To learn more about enrolling, please call the school.
 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

1420 West Grace Street
Chicago, IL 60613
Phone: (773) 534-5750

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