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GreatSchools Rating

Blaine Elementary School

Public | PK-8 | 901 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 11 ratings
2013:
Based on 7 ratings
2012:
Based on 10 ratings
2011:
Based on 8 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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90 reviews of this school


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Posted October 16, 2014

Regarding the last entry... couldn't agree more. Afterwards, I thought the principal should be required to read the CPS policy on bullying. And when did they add a second vice principal? While we're constantly being asked for money, they just added (at least) another $120,000 administrative job. That money would be so much better spent in the classroom, not Laraviere's empire building.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 23, 2014

I think the principal should send out an email telling the parents he can't run the school because he needs to advance his political career. He was complaining there is no money and now he has 2 vice principals. How does the school board allow this? CPS should look at all the children leaving this school for other local CPS schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 23, 2014

man i hated this school in the first place the principal was terrible all he cared about is the fame most teachers just hand out worksheets and the kids are a**holes


Posted August 17, 2014

This school has been a struggle from the start. I am wanting to switch my child out so bad. Any child with an IEP is not supported at all. This school, specifically the principle, is very focused on status and political agenda vs growing strong successful children that are set up for success. They may talk that their focus is the children, I wish it really was.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 23, 2014

As a parent with children attending middle school at Blaine, I find the quality of education to be fantastic for a Chicago public school. There are definately areas that need to be improved, such as the large class sizes, and lack of communication skills of some of the teaching staff. The parental support, committment, and volunteer service at this school is outstanding! Not elitist. I admire these parent volunteers very much, as I work full time and can not commit as much time as they do. Bravo to the Blaine parent volunteers! I must admit, I am a bit perplexed by the two March 19 reviews (who are obviously by the same person, using the strange phrase "raving reviews" multiple times).Sentences such as "having a seventh grader is bad enough," should raise a red flag. Is it possible that it was not the school that failed this parent's seventh grader, but the parent? I strongly agree with this March 19th reviewer on finding actual Blaine parents to speak too. You would get a much better idea of the quality of the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 19, 2014

Most of the reviews below should start with " Hello beautiful people," that is Blaine's principal. Many think the "raving" reviews on Great Schools are being written by Blaine's Principal.I agree the higher the test score the bigger his BONUS, except he forgot the kids are people, not test scores. The Principal made his rounds during ISAT testing from 5th grade on; telling the kids how important the test scores are to his teachers and the school (10% of the teachers review comes from test scores.) I wish my child was not a test score but a student. As a parent my greatest concern is; 20 students out of 78 got into selective enrollment high schools. The middle school teachers failed these kids and so did the principal. Please, show up on the field and ask the parents, they can tell you Blaine is not the school it used to be. Our kids are test scores now. The principal receives a bonus with better scores! (Ask any parent if their child can spell or knows what a semi colon is.......they do not.) I have now paid for a tutor to teach my child because Blaine does not. Having a 7th grader is bad enough; having an administraion that does not care is worse!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 19, 2014

If I could give this school less than one star I would. This is a horribly, elitist school led by an elitist group of parents & principal. Teachers are disorganized & apathetic to their student. They outwardly chastise the student for their disorganization. Who is the adult here? They are criminally ineffective & passive/aggressive with both parent & student. Teachers are on the defensive when contacted (IF they email back). Administration offers plenty of lip service without follow through. They only care about test scores to maintain their elitist rating amongst the other exclusive & high-end clientele schools of Chicago. It is a disgrace and appalling to witness how this school operates. Don't go by the 'raving' reviews in Great schools; talk to a few random parents after school and judge for yourself; then seek schooling for your child elsewhere.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 21, 2014

In comparison to other CPS schools, Blaine is still a "top shelf" academic institution. I've done the research. I have always maintained an excellent rapport with my children's instructors because I make it my business to do so. Can the need for parental reinforcement within the educational process seem paramount at times? Absolutely. Are there times when the work load of the teachers fails to meet parent expectation in the middle? Absolutely. Does this make Blaine a less-than-stellar academic institution? Absolutely NOT. As a very hands on parent I can honestly say that I see learning taking place. Yes, I also see some "empty" memorization happening at times too but that's all in the name of the academic numbers game across the board, in ALL schools. But in our school the former definitely outweighs the latter. It's easy to stand on one side of the fence and bark, but until the day comes where human teachers are replaced by robots with a magic microchip, there will continue to be much work on the part of both parents and teachers to find that happy medium that leaves NO CHILD left behind. No teacher is perfect & I believe that teachers should be met with a little more compassion.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 21, 2014

My review is in response to the parent who hastily criticized Blaine on Feb 14. The teachers do a great job challenging students with advance curriculum, from my experience with my daughter, it helps tremendously getting into a good high school. The drop off comment, Blaine can always use parents at drop off to help making it less nightmarish, so stop complaining and get helping. The administration is ready to help with any issue, emails are answered. Wonderful school, proud of it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 13, 2014

Blaine is a great school in many ways but there are some real instructional problems in the elementary school. There seems to be an academic push that requires students to learn a lot of information that isn't mastered or even really "taught." Explanations can be lacking particularly in math and it's not because a child needs a tutor either. Be prepared to provide deeper clarification and help. Don't expect teachers to return your requests for an email, or phone call even if you use the Parent Portal. They often ignore you until it gets to the point of needing to meet with them and then they will act as though everything is fine. Kids who are good students will have grades that make no sense from time to time. It makes you wonder about what their "real" grades especially when homework scores are high but other scores are not. If you are lucky enough to get into the accelerated program, you may find the teachers to be better as previous comments have mentioned. That isn't the case in the other classrooms.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 12, 2014

So happy we made the move into Blaine district. I had a wonderful face-to-face with the principal to share a concern that my child was having in class. Mr. Laravere suggested I talk to the teacher, which of course made perfect sense. My concerns were addressed, and two weeks later, the principal asked me how things were going. I appreciated the follow up. Amazing teachers. Amazing parents, too. People really reach out to make sure I know ways to be involved, and now that I volunteer when I can, it makes a world of difference in my connection to the community. If you're thinking about moving into Blaine district, but you're just not sure, trust me: it will be a good decision. Great preparation for high school and beyond.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 28, 2013

The teachers have all been wonderful so for that I give 5 stars! Again teachers and PTA all get an A+ from me. Other staff members need to work on things but VP seems great! I did read the large class size comment so that is a concern for me now. Lower level classes are good at 23-25 students. So if you have a younger child it may not be a concern for you. For a city school it is a good choice.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 30, 2013

For those using this site to research Blaine School, please take the negative reviews with a grain of salt. There is clearly a very agitated parent on here who is having it out with other parents and the administration, and posting multiple times to get his/her points across. To really get a sense of a school community, go to their PTO events. Make an appointment to meet the administration and form your own opinions. Visit other schools to get a real comparison. True, there sometimes is a negative vibe among SOME parents at the school (and where doesn't that exist? show me where it doesn't exist!) but the majority of parents are productive and positive thinkers and doers. It's very easy to be a complainer. BUT, isn't it nobler to be a problem solver? I reckon it may even make for a happier, more well adjusted person. And there are PLENTY more of the latter at this fine school. But don't take my word for it. Talk to the parents in the know. Talk to the parent council members. Seek out the PTO. You will be more better informed when you do.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 18, 2013

My child has been attending Blaine for 7 years. She has received an exemplary education throughout the time at the school. Yes, I agree, 38 children per classroom is too many, but the teachers have done an exceptional job with making it work. There are some teachers who are weaker than others but the school should not be faulted for a few people that compete with some of the top teachers in the city. The new principal has had to make some adjustments, but change is good. I have never had a problem getting a meeting with him. Though I have only sought him out a handful of times. In every school, there will be issues. My suggestion is...be the change you hope too see. If your child needs help, be that help regardless of whether it is a tutor, an advocate, or a friend to help her voice be heard.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 30, 2013

The June 24th poster perfectly reflects the entitled nature of some parents. They think they can actually "void" someone's opinion when they happen to disagree or because they believe it was written by a teacher! As my daughter would say, "that's just crazy." Yes our principal has been under investigation - it's not a secret since he reported it first at a public meeting. The question is why have none of the allegations been proven to be true? The answer is because they have been made by a few disgruntled current and FORMER parents who did not get their way with the new administration. So they have made it their personal mission to bring our new principal down. But the problem with their strategy is that he does excellent work, parental involvement is higher than ever and already high academic performances have gotten even better under his leadership. Is he perfect? No. But he also has done nothing to warrant the investigations (all of which have been proven unfounded). So in the end, all this small handful of parents has achieved is to create time-consuming distractions, when energies would have been better spent focused on further strengthening the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 13, 2013

I agree with the last post that the investigation into our principal confirmed nothing other than that Blaine is an exemplary school! The problems we experience are due to CPS issues (funding, etc.), but our administration is great and is clearly trying to work with parents to identify and address any issues. Our patent community is wonderful and involved, and our children are happy and learning-that says great school to me!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 21, 2013

The post submitted on May 13th is sadly taken out of context. It s true that there have been investigations of our principal, spearheaded by a few parents (some who no longer even attend Blaine), that have received a disproportionate amount of attention from our principals superior, that have cost our administration countless hours of preparing reports in defense and have ended with the CPS legal department finding NOT EVEN ONE SINGLE SUBSTANTIATION TO THE ACCUSATIONS. Not one. Our LSC visited with the network Chief Officer and CPS legal department (more wasted time) and were told that not only was there no foundation for the accusations and investigations, they found Blaine to be exemplary in many of the areas that were questioned. Saddest part of the whole story, all of this was also discussed at the April 30th LSC meeting, but did not find its way into the prior post. Our principal is often lost in his thoughts and can be distant and is not as outgoing and friendly as our amazingly outgoing and friendly AP, but he is a passionate, prepared, empowering, innovative instructor of educators. Isn t this the highest priority?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 18, 2013

It's unfortunate the tuition-based preschool will most likely go away. I understand it's not essential, and the school needs space. But I feel horrible that my child will have to go somewhere else for a year, new teacher, new classmates, etc. - My child has been so happy this past year. Hopefully all the children will be ok. I just I can find a good replacement for the next year. I appreciate the principal calling a meeting and giving us advance notice. All of this just sucks and the children are the ones who will have to deal.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 5, 2012

I will admit: I don't go to LSC meetings. I don't go to PTA-run "coffee clutches" with the principal. I'm sure the principal wouldn't know who I am nor would have a reason to go out of his way to talk to me. Perhaps I'm one of those adults who just prefers to low-profile. I don't spend anytime at drop off and pick up because I work and I rely on after school programs and hired help to support my schedules. BUT... my kids tell me that they are happy. They are learning. They are challenged by the work given to them. They have adapted to switching classrooms/teachers, and are thankful for the break in monotony and change of environment during their school day. The teachers offer up their emails. They have websites. I don't bother them much with questions because I figure they are busy teaching. I assume the administration folks are busy administering direction and keeping order. My kids are learning and love going to school and want to work hard for their teachers. To me, THAT, above all else, is the mark of an excellent elementary education. Every teacher my kids have had in the past 4 years at Blaine have been nothing short of dedicated to students. this yer is no exception.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 12, 2012

I agree with the previous review. The quality of the education at Blaine is outstanding. I am proud of this school and I feel lucky to be able to send my kids to this school. They have a new tech teacher, a brand new computer lab and a future science teacher that will teach science through art and this is a public school!! Accolades to the new administration :)
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
87%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
99%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
88%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
93%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
96%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
90%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
98%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
97%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
90%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
97%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
96%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
98%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students82%
Female81%
Male82%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic63%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income40%
Not low income92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)58%
Students without disabilities85%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students94%
Female95%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic88%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Low income80%
Not low income97%
Students with disabilities (IEP)75%
Students without disabilities97%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students90%
Female92%
Male89%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic88%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White91%
Low income76%
Not low income95%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities95%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students89%
Female95%
Male83%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic92%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White91%
Low income82%
Not low income91%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities92%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students99%
Female97%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic96%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Low income100%
Not low income98%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students88%
Female83%
Male92%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic81%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White92%
Low income73%
Not low income93%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities90%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students88%
Female89%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic83%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White96%
Low income76%
Not low income92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities88%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students87%
Female87%
Male87%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic75%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Low income87%
Not low income87%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities93%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students89%
Female93%
Male83%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic82%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income87%
Not low income90%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities94%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students88%
Female84%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic79%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low income74%
Not low income94%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities91%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students88%
Female87%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic82%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Low income72%
Not low income94%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities91%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students93%
Female95%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic83%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income79%
Not low income98%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities94%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students85%
Female88%
Male79%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic76%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low income65%
Not low income93%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities91%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students85%
Female88%
Male79%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic71%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Low income65%
Not low income93%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities91%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Above average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Math growth at this school

Above average

Reading growth at this school

Above average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 56% 51%
Hispanic 28% 24%
Two or more races 7% 3%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 4% 4%
Black 4% 18%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 0%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Assistant principal(s)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
PE instructor(s)
School psychologist
School social worker/counselors(s)
Speech and language therapist(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Special education / special needs

Staff resources available to students
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Music room
  • Performance stage
Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
  • Photography
Performing and written arts
  • Drama
  • Poetry

Language learning

Staff resources available to students
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
School facilities
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
School Leader's name
  • Troy Anthony Laraviere

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
  • Speech and language therapist(s)
Transportation options
  • Accessible via public transportation
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Auditorium
  • Cafeteria
  • Gym
  • Internet access
  • Library
  • Music room
  • Performance stage
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Cross country
  • Flag football
  • Soccer
Girls sports
  • Cheerleading
  • Cross country
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
  • Photography
Performing arts
  • Drama
  • Poetry
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Upcoming Events

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1420 West Grace Street
Chicago, IL 60613
Phone: (773) 534-5750

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