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GreatSchools Rating

Amandla Elementary Charter School

Charter | 5-8 | 344 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

2 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 4 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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5 reviews of this school


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Posted November 19, 2012

My children do not attend this school, but they attend the school that Amandla rents space from. This school has only been in existence for 4 years, is a charter and hires inexperienced staff at a lower wage. Older kids will take advantage if they can, especially around peers. These staff allow that. I don't think they have any ideal of classroom discipline or how to deal with older kids. My kids school is circulating a petition to not allow Amandla to renew their lease in our building. They throw stuff out windows and a parent was taken by ambulance because one child threw a backpack full of books out a 4th floor window. I don't necessarily blame the kids (though they are older kids and should know better), but there is no structure and discipline from these 'teachers'.


Posted June 6, 2012

This school needs to be re-organized by the Charter School Board. My child was not given permission to attend a field trip, but the "Principle" allowed her to go. And, by the way the Principle attended the trip along with her "wife". I have no problem with your life choices but don't embark them on our children. Whereas the curriculum is great, children make mistakes, they are not perfect. by the way nor are the Principle/Teachers. This school do not have a "PTA" group; and I believe it s because they do not want the parents to get together on all of the issues at this school. The Board of Directors at this school, I do not believe exist, just try to get in touch with one of them you will see. There is no gym, music, or art classes, these classes might provide an outlet for the children. I simply "hate" this school, and will say that this school is an accident waiting to happen. One of my children is an A student and the other a B/C student, so this is not the problem. You have a school being run by individuals that has no clue on life issues. They left my son that was being bullied to have peer mediation with the student that was bullying him by themselves. Is that wisdom or what?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 6, 2012

I am so glad this school year is over so I can take my children out of this poorly run school. The students should keep the rules but the Board of Directors, Principle, Assistant Principle; Dean(s) do not know how to run a school. Ask them how do they select children to go on field trips? How long do punishments last? Who is over the PTA? How often does their Board meet? And who exactly is running the school, the principle or the board of directors (no accident or lowercase they do not deserve upper case) and if these individuals are different. Do they have a gym room? Do they offer gym? These are just a few questions. I do not like this school, and do not think this school is in the best interest of students overall. They do not know how to handle real issues that is why a student tried to jump out of the window and kill herself this school year. My son has been totally depressed almost this entire school year; Thank
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 19, 2012

This school has an excellent curriculum. The advisory staff truely prepares your child for college. The accelerated reading, math, and science program is extraordinary. However, the disciplinary structure is very strict. Nevertheless, children need discipline to complete college therefore, I fully support their efforts. Keep up the great work Amandla Family !
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 2, 2010

I don't feel they are respecting the parents point of view. They judge the students according to temperment for the day. The rules they have for the students are to subjective instead of objective. The students are not being taught how to change their behavior, just punished.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
23%

2012

 
 
52%

2011

 
 
59%

2010

 
 
74%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
26%

2012

 
 
44%

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
67%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
17%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
71%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
23%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
73%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
38%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
36%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students23%
Female32%
Male15%
Black24%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income24%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities27%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students26%
Female37%
Male15%
Black26%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income24%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities29%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students17%
Female13%
Male20%
Black18%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income17%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities18%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students23%
Female26%
Male20%
Black24%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income23%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities24%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students43%
Female39%
Male49%
Black43%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income43%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities47%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students38%
Female38%
Male37%
Black37%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income37%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities42%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students57%
Female59%
Male54%
Black57%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income57%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities62%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students43%
Female43%
Male42%
Black43%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income41%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities48%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students36%
Female43%
Male30%
Black36%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income36%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities39%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Below average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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District
State
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10

Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
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8
9
10

Math growth at this school

Below Average

Reading growth at this school

Below Average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 100% 18%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 4%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Hispanic 0% 24%
Two or more races 0% 3%
White 0% 51%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Female 46%N/A49%
Male 54%N/A51%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Erin Ferguson

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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6800 South Stewart Avenue
Chicago, IL 60621
Phone: (773) 396-8022

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