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GreatSchools Rating

Carnegie Elementary School

Public | PK-8 | 728 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

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Parent involvement

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15 reviews of this school


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Posted September 18, 2014

My child attended the gifted kindergarten, and I was very impressed with what she was learning. The teachers and staff are friendly and the children are well behaved. Unfortunately we had to leave the program, because my child was having too much separation anxiety. Her teacher was very understanding and really wanted to work with us. But we decided it was best to hold our child back a year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 28, 2014

The policies established by CPS made it difficult to obtain services in a timely manner. Early intervention and a great understanding of ADHD on the part of the staff would have improved the situation as well. When my child did qualify for special assistance in the classroom her improvement was immediate, unfortunately her zest for school and self-esteem were diminished in the process. Interventionist were a necessary asset to schools and an effective strategy to preventing failure. My child lost a year! The school's RTI was ineffective and impossible for a teacher to complete with a class size over 20. Once both my children were accessed, they received services; however it is a fight..if you are easily discouraged, uneducated or unwilling to challenge them, your child will be lost. What about the children with no advocates.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 27, 2014

My daughter attends the Carnegie RGC and we are so thrilled with her experience. She has taken huge strides academically and is surrounded by love and attention. The children are respectful and kind to one another, and the results of their hard work are amazing. The teachers are engaged and highly skilled. A wide range of activities are available as well as aftercare options and intensive tutoring. It is not a perfect school, but it is a very good one, and I recommend a tour and serious consideration from any parent.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 24, 2012

My child started at Carnegie in the gifted program almost 6 years ago. My 2nd daughter just completed the pre-K program. I will say that the pre-K teacher was excellent. She got my daughter where she needed to be. I have not been satisfied with my older child's teacher's since 1st grade gifted. That is why I am transferring them out for the coming school year. I was not a complete product of the public school system. Most of my elementary school years and high school years were spent in either Christian or Catholic school. So, I don't know why I though I could trust the public school system to educate my children. That being said, I am looking forward to them leaving. I would not recommend Carnegie school to any parent.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 26, 2012

The leadership at this school is EXTREMELY poor. I have taken a few issues to the principal (Marlene Heath) and each time she either FAILS to thoroughly care for the issue or allows the TEACHERS to act on her behalf. Speaking of teachers, many of them speak to the students like they are DOGS and have even called the unacceptable names. Some teachers DO work hard however, MOST of then are LAZY and seem to be there just for the paycheck. THEY run the school -NOT the principal. Its really sad... This school is a JOKE -I would NOT recommend it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 5, 2010

This is not a bad school, but I have found over the last four years that the atmosphere leaves a lot to be desired. Although there is not a lot of outright violence, there is an excessive amount of teasing and bullying. Some of the teachers are spectacular, while others just clock their hours and get out of there. The PTA is new, and they're doing as well as they can, but not a lot of parents are involved in the school program.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 9, 2009

With their new golf program Carnegie now expands the childrens' mind in sports as well as scholastics.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 5, 2009

My child is just completing the Gifted Kindergarten program at Carnegie. As a teacher, I waas terrified to release my impressionable baby to just ANYBODY, ANYWHERE. I drove by the school at all hours of the day and night to 'check out' the neighborhood and the school grounds. I was pleased with the area surrounding the school. The summer 'mock' week of school was extremely beneficial and thoughtful to get the children ready for their first classroom experience. Mrs. Wilson and Ms. Hudson are FANTASTIC! My child can read better than a second grader, can add and subtract two digit numbers. They have given scientific challenges, and knowledge in Social Sciences. Not to mention that we were particularily 'stumped' on a geometry assignment that my child eloquently explained to us!! The school is clean and safe, security is on point, and the principal is a true educator! Great afterschool programs and PTA!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 8, 2008

Carnegie School from my personal experience is one of the best elementary schools you can go to. I say this because you learn what you need to learn to exceed in life-in all subjects because the teachers are your friends and want to help you in all parts of your life. But I'm going to keep the rating realistic, because just because i go to the school I'm not going to rate excellent when I know that even though the school is one of the best, there is still a school that is better than them in some or most ways.
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 7, 2008

I am a parent of (2) students attending Carnegie School. My son entered Gifted K, almost 6 years ago and my daughter just completed Gifted K. I am more than pleased with not only (most important) curriculum but the environment in whole. The teachers that I have been in contact with are indeed supportive, caring and overall DEDICATED. This unfortunately is rare within our public school system for many of reasons. It is my opinion having an education background that teachers are just as important as the parent as it relates to a students level of success. I owe, my son and my daughters 'success' to Carnegie's staff. In 5 (going on six) years I have yet, felt as though my children werent safe enough or didnt belong to this school. I am pleased to be a part of the Carnegie Community. :)
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 8, 2008

My 6 year old is in gifted kindergaten and has learnt so much this year. She reads very well and and seems to enjoy school. Her reading level is comparable to a 2nd grader.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 31, 2007

The gifted program is still fairly new and leaves a lot to be desired. It's not what I expected and isn't comparable to the other Regional Gifted Centers.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 13, 2006

My name is Charlene Stubbs all of my 6 children went to carnegie and 3 graduated and 1 is about to graduate and I have 1 that has 2 years to go. this school is awesome. We have the most team spirit when we have an outting such as cheerleading competition or any other sport the whole school, family, friedns, teachers and principal attends. We support our students and teachers at this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 22, 2005

The teachers are great and really give the students the attention they need to be successful.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 4, 2005

This school has been as close to an answer to a prayer, as I'm likely to find, in a Southside public school. The pricipal is a caring, energetic leader. The teachers and staff are, for the most part, caring, & enthusiastic, about teaching the students. The program offerings, are varied, & there are two magnet program options, currently offered. The children are challenged by the work, & projects (although, there could be more homework given, I think). Overall, I can live with the thought that this is where my children are receiving their elementary education. Oh, before I forget, the average standard test scores are decent, and rising.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
70%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
62%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
96%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
62%

2010

 
 
81%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
77%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
89%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
72%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
27%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
77%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
40%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
87%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
40%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
72%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
72%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
81%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
36%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
79%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
88%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students61%
Female58%
Male66%
Black59%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income60%
Not low income67%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities64%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students68%
Female72%
Male61%
Black66%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income63%
Not low income92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities72%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students56%
Female47%
Male63%
Black55%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income50%
Not low income83%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities59%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students50%
Female44%
Male55%
Black49%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income43%
Not low income83%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities53%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students76%
Female66%
Male84%
Black75%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income72%
Not low income92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities79%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students44%
Female47%
Male41%
Black44%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income36%
Not low income77%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities46%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students53%
Female64%
Male41%
Black53%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income47%
Not low income77%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities55%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students27%
Female28%
Male27%
Black26%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income20%
Not low income67%
Students with disabilities (IEP)0%
Students without disabilities31%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students40%
Female55%
Male31%
Black40%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income32%
Not low income83%
Students with disabilities (IEP)0%
Students without disabilities46%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students40%
Female37%
Male43%
Black41%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income39%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities42%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students57%
Female60%
Male54%
Black59%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income53%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities60%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students67%
Female66%
Male69%
Black69%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income66%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities70%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students36%
Female46%
Male28%
Black35%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income31%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities39%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students46%
Female59%
Male33%
Black45%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income42%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities49%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Math growth at this school

Below Average

Reading growth at this school

Average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 98% 18%
Hispanic 1% 24%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 4%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Two or more races 0% 3%
White 0% 51%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Nurse(s)
PE instructor(s)
School psychologist
School social worker/counselors(s)
Security personnel
Speech and language therapist(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school officials and community members.

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Special education / special needs

Staff resources available to students
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

School facilities
  • Computer lab

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
Performing and written arts
  • Dance

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish
Staff resources available to students
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
School facilities
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Docilla Pollard

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
  • Security personnel
  • Speech and language therapist(s)
Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
Transportation options
  • Accessible via public transportation
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Cafeteria
  • Computer lab
  • Gym
  • Internet access
  • Library
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cheerleading
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Performing arts
  • Dance
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Parent involvement
  • Join PTO/PTA
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Apply

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1414 East 61st Place
Chicago, IL 60637
Phone: (773) 535-0530

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