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GreatSchools Rating

Lincoln Elementary School

Public | K-5 | 414 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 3 ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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15 reviews of this school


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Posted Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Sadly, I've been quite underwhelmed with this school over the years. I suppose education has changed over the last decade and I find it hardly recognizable today. I've asked myself many times over the years if it's Lincoln, District 65, or just education these days and I'm not sure of the appropriate answer. Nonetheless, Lincoln has been disappointing to me. We've had our three children here for the last four years and have only had two good teachers between the three of them. The principal is absent, seemingly uninspired and uninspiring, and principal before was aggressive and unwelcoming. I want to love this school, as it's so close and the community is great, but the school and it's staff and lack of staff (office) just don't get the job done. Things need to change from the testing, to the short lunch, to the short recess, and teaching to the test. I don't feel we can raise inspired, free-thinking, functioning, happy children until we make some changes in our schools. Lincoln has just not done it for us.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 4, 2014

We have been a part of the Lincoln community for several years. The teachers are caring and communicative. The parent community is highly involved. There are many after-school activities and wonderful community-building events. I would definitely recommend Lincoln to other families.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 27, 2014

Lincoln is a school that has grown faster than it can handle. Consensus among parents I've polled is that the new Principal doesn't respond to emails or calls and is rarely seen. New renovation left the field where kids used to play a mess and unusable. Outdoor play space severely limited. Indoor recess is awful: no physical activity, kids must be quiet, etc. This school is a mess. We're looking to get the heck out.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 27, 2013

Lincoln has gone through significant changes in the last three years. There is a gorgeous renovated building (with multi-purpose room, new classrooms, and bright windows), two new young principals, and a growing population now over 500 kids. With that has come changes in leadership and enrichment offerings. This school is certainly on the up and a very popular place to be right now.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 15, 2012

I have one child now finishing kindergarten. It's been a phenomenal year for our child and for us. The school is in the midst of some much-needed renovations; it will be wonderful not to have to eat lunch in the gym, and to have an auditorium that holds the entire student body.....as well as to have playgrounds and playspaces back from the construction trucks! The physical space results in the one star off.....the teachers, staff, other students and other families have been AMAZING. Very diverse population, strong emphasis on respect, nice positive behavioral incentive program, strong PTA offerings after school....we're thrilled to be part of the Lincoln community.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 17, 2011

I have 2 children at this school. One is in middle school now and she did fine, except for the kindergarten class needs lots of work. My other daughter has been recently diagnosed with ADD, I had issues previously but was told by teachers she would grow out of it. I have to say with the type of issues someone should have spoken to me earlier. I hate to feel that she was just overlooked academically. However, I am dealing with it now and working very hard with her, I just feel that with this common disorder teacher needs to read the signs since they do have our kids for the better part of the day and can see the issues in that setting where it is important. The parent community is awesome.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 23, 2011

I have 3 kids at Lincoln K,3,5. The school has had strong teachers with small class sizes. The facilities are the weakest link - and are on a plan to be improved by the school district. The math curriculum is strong and differentiation is happening in the classroom - although it took 1/2 year to kick in. I am most impressed by the other kids. Great diverse student body with extremely talented children in many dimensions. There are many activities before/after school from an outstanding Chess program to languages and Yoga. The parent base is re-energizing and activating with a VERY large K class this year and expected for next year. The Principal has been with the School for 10 years and brought stability to the school as it re-energizes for continued improvement. As you look at test scores I encourage you to look at all bands as there is a very diverse student body. There is strength throughout the spectrum and the trend is moving the right direction.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 4, 2008

This is our 8th and final year at Lincoln (2 kids from k-5) and it's been a great experience. I would certainly recommend this school to any parents considering it. The class sizes are generally below average and we've found the principal and teachers to be very engaged and easy to talk to. The teachers are in tune with each other so the programs are coordinated from one level to the next - the kids are prepared. The PTA is well run and I recommend getting involved. No matter where you end up, there's a good chance you'll find things thatyou think are not perfect - at Lincoln you will be heard and they will work with you to get your kids where they need to be.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 15, 2008

The community of teachers, staff, parents, and students is fabulous and, in my experience, supportive and inclusive. My son is involved in two after-school activities, sponsored by the PTA, and loves them. My son has some minor special needs and has never been teased or ridiculed for them, which is worth its weight in gold to a parent. Both teachers we've had have worked with us, and with understanding, to meet my son's needs and to challenge him at the same tim.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 6, 2007

It is a shame that the heritage of the arts that Lincoln Elementary has brought to the Evanston community, and the world beyond is falling so quickly. The school has lost many wonderfully gifted teachers, and has been replacing quickly them with little consideration of the lasting impact that high teacher/ student turn over rate affects the education of the students, the families, the staff moral within the school, nor for the community. Not necessarily the individual school's fault, but the district office. Lincoln has had many great actors and musicians pass through its doors, and I only hope that HQ can find a way to bring back the arts without any political agendas attached, so that we can have more Cusack s, and Piven s come out of Lincoln. Time will only tell. But we can not afford to wait any longer to see what fate holds for the area.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 1, 2007

The kindergarten program was very poor. we had a teacher who was just not appropriate for an early childhood classroom. Furthermore, I saw very little best practices of early childhood being followed. Thankfully, we had a wonderful first grade teacher. After we suffered through kindergarten, it was a great place.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 10, 2006

My son just granduated from Lincoln School.He was there k-5, except for 4th grade where he was at Orrington.We liked Lincoln School population and staff much better.My son had an IEP and got amazing support from Mrs. Joseph.His language arts skills are way above grade level now.His teachers really worked hard with him on his focusing/ADD issues.They did many awesome projects and field trips, and the kids were really encouraged to stretch beyond what they thought their capacity was.I don't like their math program but that is statewide.He has health issues and the nurse gave him individulalized attention when he needed it.Negatives were:The lunch room situation was very chaotic.I hear it is getting better.And sometimes we were very overwhelmed by the homework load. My son felt like Lincoln was 'his place' all the way down to the janitors. We'll miss the place.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 19, 2006

This School has poor academic programs. It's after Extended day program is awfull. extracuricular activities have been limited over the years. No sports programs for younger kids. if parents choose to place their kids in this school they should be very careful. This school is bused for itegration which is very bad.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 19, 2005

Teachers are very caring. We had one in 3rd grade who was particularly strong in teaching math. They also loved reading. Unfortauntely, the spelling curriculum was non-existant. The music teacher when we arrived was superb, using Orff on a regular basis, but has since changed. I'm not a fan of the U of Chicago math curriculum, but it seems it's everywhere now.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 5, 2004

Actually I'm not a parent, I'm alumni. I went there in the early 90's, so i don't think too much has changed. There is still some teachers I know that work there. I recomend it for it's great encouragement of the arts. (and I think most of the art teachers I had are still there). We went through 3 principals when I went there, so I'll pick the one that was there though most of my education, Mrs. Stringer I beleave was her name.
—Submitted by a former student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
86%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
85%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
88%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
79%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
80%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students73%
Female71%
Male76%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low income52%
Not low income90%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities75%
English language learners58%

Reading

All Students77%
Female82%
Male72%
Black70%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White96%
Low income57%
Not low income92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities80%
English language learners46%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students69%
Female80%
Male64%
Black31%
Asiann/a
Hispanic55%
Multiracial70%
Native Americann/a
White89%
Low income52%
Not low income79%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities75%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students68%
Female85%
Male61%
Black46%
Asiann/a
Hispanic42%
Multiracial80%
Native Americann/a
White86%
Low income46%
Not low income81%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities74%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students84%
Female95%
Male79%
Black62%
Asiann/a
Hispanic91%
Multiracial70%
Native Americann/a
White93%
Low income76%
Not low income88%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities89%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students74%
Female76%
Male70%
Black43%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White93%
Low income55%
Not low income89%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities81%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students73%
Female78%
Male64%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White84%
Low income59%
Not low income85%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities82%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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District
State
1
2
3
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5
6
7
8
9
10

Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Math growth at this school

Above average

Reading growth at this school

Average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 47% 51%
Black 22% 18%
Hispanic 14% 24%
Two or more races 12% 3%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 3% 4%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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910 Forest Avenue
Evanston, IL 60202
Phone: (847) 859-8970

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