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GreatSchools Rating

Nichols Middle School

Public | 6-8 | 546 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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12 reviews of this school


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Posted August 20, 2013

I am entering 8th grade at Nichols, and am very pleased to be doing so. The staff at Nichols are all great at what they do, and treat every student equally. There is very little bullying, but even the smallest of issues are tackled head on by teachers. I have also witnessed students calling out rude behavior, and making it clear that they won't tolerate it either. All the teachers are smart and caring, and it is obvious that they would do anything to help a student succeed, both academically, and in real life. Every teacher I have had will give up their free time to help a struggling student, before and after school, and during their lunch period. There are many extracurricular activities, like sports, science and math clubs, and even school plays. We always have enough time to socialize, and I, personally, have never felt overwhelmed by any part of school life. Nichols is a fun, safe place to learn, and is great for kids at any level, with any disability, race or gender. I am proud of my school.


Posted April 5, 2012

This school shocked me. While I thought Evanston schools were excellent in their curriculum, Nichols disappointed me. The students used TOO much profanity, and talked about sex to girls faces. The teachers were not very accommodating, and didn't explain a lot. I expected more from Nichols.


Posted February 25, 2011

I feel that Nichols is amazing! beautiful! too cool! and a great learning space! I love it personally


Posted January 5, 2010

As a student at Nichols, I have been dissapointed. I feel that many of the teachers are not dedicated to helping ALL students learn. After all, if you teach to the 'average' student, you are only teaching to one person.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 29, 2008

I just transfered my step son from Wilmette because his Father now has joint custodyof him and resides with us. I have to say that because of unforseen circumstances, I registered him on the last day. We did not get a schedule until 10:30 am the first day of school. Between the S.Workers, principal and myself we were able to put togethr a sheduel with his IEP that was very satisfactory. I was quite impressed on how accomodating the whole staff was in welcoming my son into the school. It did help that his best friend goes there and lots of kids that he did know because of EBSA baseball. It was a very smooth transition. For a kid that never has liked school, he comes home happy,likes his and teachers. All in all a thumbs up!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 18, 2008

Last year I pulled my daughter out of a private school because of a bullying problem and enrolled her in Nichols mid week- The principle was wonderful and very helpful. She adjusted so easily and found it more challenging. there is no bullying. It is not tolerated like the other school. I'm sure it has it's problems like any other school but going on a field trip I found the children to be so well adjusted and respectful
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 21, 2008

Now there are many parents and teachers writing reviews about how Nichols Middle School is a good school or a bad school. But as a student who actually goes there. You might get a better idea of it. I love this is school so much. I would not pick another one in the world. The teachers are so welcoming and so friendly. They teach the different subjects perfectly and they know excatly what they are saying and how to explain it. I couldn't be more proud of my school. All my classmates get along so well and there are no bullies at all. This a very good school and you should bring your children here
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 14, 2006

Nichols is a very good school given the economic situation the district is in and the very diverse population that it serves. There has been a huge turn-over from old, tired teachers to young, energetic ones who truly seem driven to help the kids that walk through its doors. As with other schools there are some not-so-good and some outstanding teachers at Nichols. With NCLB and better money management, teaching and learning are on the upswing at Nichols.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted November 22, 2005

I am the parent of a child with an IEP. I have been frustrated when my phone calls are not returned, repeatedly; when meetings promised never happen or stall for months, repeatedly; when I have provided important information and files and they have been lost, repeatedly; when written communication has not been acknowledged, repeatedly. District 65 and Nichols Middle School have failed my family and I, repeatedly.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 23, 2005

I moved to Evanston, paying double the rent I could have in nearby neighborhoods, because I heard the schools were so much better. I've been nothing but dissapointed with all of District 65, and Nichols is no different. The teachers are mediocre or outright poor, the support staff is constantly changing, and nothing is acomplished in a timely manner. My son is in Special Ed for a simple learning disability, and it takes months to get a meeting scheduled, and there is no follow-through on the accomodations which his teachers have agreed to. They refuse to even look at his assignment book to make sure he's written down his assignments - even though this is in his IEP! I've gone into his classroom to find gramatical and spelling errors written on the board in the teacher's writing; the teachers do not know how to work the computers. Abysmal.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 6, 2004

Nichols is a middle school where your kids can really learn alot. The school is integrated and gives your children a great cultural experience, the teachers are fun and reliable, and your children will get as much attention as they need. Each teacher at Nichols makes sure that kids follow school rules and keeps the enviroment safe. Nichols is the best school in Evanston, especially for kids who need improvement on behavioral or academic skills.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 9, 2003

Nichols is a great school and i would recommend it to anyone. If parents are having trouble with other schools, send 'em to Nichols!


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
92%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
87%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
90%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
91%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students77%
Female76%
Male78%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Hispanic69%
Multiracial91%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income52%
Non-low income91%
Students with disabilities (IEP)46%
Students without disabilities80%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students79%
Female79%
Male78%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Hispanic73%
Multiracial82%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low income55%
Non-low income91%
Students with disabilities (IEP)43%
Students without disabilities82%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students76%
Female78%
Male73%
Black56%
Asian91%
Hispanic59%
Multiracial50%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White95%
Low income54%
Non-low income92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)33%
Students without disabilities83%
English language learners25%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students75%
Female78%
Male73%
Black64%
Asian73%
Hispanic53%
Multiracial64%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White92%
Low income55%
Non-low income90%
Students with disabilities (IEP)36%
Students without disabilities82%
English language learners8%
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students89%
Female90%
Male87%
Black77%
Asian82%
Hispanic81%
Multiracial79%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income77%
Non-low income97%
Students with disabilities (IEP)61%
Students without disabilities94%
English language learners42%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students68%
Female69%
Male67%
Black48%
Asiann/a
Hispanic51%
Multiracial60%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Low income56%
Non-low income77%
Students with disabilities (IEP)18%
Students without disabilities75%
English language learners23%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students71%
Female75%
Male67%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Hispanic52%
Multiracial67%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White95%
Low income55%
Non-low income84%
Students with disabilities (IEP)27%
Students without disabilities77%
English language learners8%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2011-2012 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 44% 51%
Black 26% 18%
Hispanic 20% 23%
Two or more races 6% 3%
Asian 4% 4%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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800 Greenleaf Street
Evanston, IL 60202
Phone: (847) 859-8660

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