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GreatSchools Rating

Prairie Crossing Charter School

Charter | K-8 | 265 students

 
 

Living in Grayslake

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $178,800. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,040.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 5 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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39 reviews of this school


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Posted January 29, 2014

I am the parent of a 4th grdr who has attended PCCS since K. In truth, I was already a supporter of the mission of the enviro focused curriculum, so this school is a great fit for us, but it's a wonderful alt for others too. It's not for everyone; kids here spend more time outdoors, getting dirty, journaling, going on extended trips, etc. than at other schools; please know what you are getting into before you decide to attend. Small schools will have the same problems any small environment has (think small town, workplace, etc.) but it also allows all of the benefits too; small class sizes, assistants in each class, feeling welcomed in classrooms-things that many parents say are missing in larger schools. Academics are still a high priority. Others try to argue this point but the results are not just in test scores (where PCCS excels) but also in the graduates it produces, most in AP classes at the top of their class in HS. Unique opportunities are given here to develop children into constructive thinkers. It's not perfect; no school is. It's smaller which means its warts seem larger in comparison but come see for yourself; it's not for everyone, but wonderful for those it serves.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 27, 2013

Prairie Crossing is a mixed bag of good and bad. Some of the parents and spouses on the board chased away principals and some of the best teachers. There is is a new principal every years so if you don't like it wait a year it will change. The teachers are good but are underpaid. Many of the kids are cliqueish as are their parents. A friend who volunteered quit doing so because of parents wanted to micro manage everyone. It is always a danger when a volunteer thinks they own the place. this place has several parents that are famous for pecking at people. Over all, the education is far superior to Woodland, which does not have a gifted program either. It sends children who have been identified gifted out to night programs at other schools. Overall, the hands on experiences here and the special trips taken (often) for all grades makes this a superior education. This is proven in their scores on state tests. It shows again in high school as the PCC students regularly are chosen for Ap and honors classes over all others. Anyone in district can go there but there is always a wait list. It was worth the 2 year wait for us and we reccomend it over other grade schools in Illinois.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 25, 2013

I attended PCCS from kindergarten to the middle of my sixth grade year. I currently attended a public high school 30 minutes from Grayslake and I have to say the academics At PCCS are a joke. I'm a fairly intelligent person and the school did nothing for anyone. We're essential taught to take standardized tests and following a hyper-environmental mindset. My math education was so poor and behind my current districts average I had a C- average my entire seventh grade year once I moved. I also was taught essential no grammar or sentence structure. Science is terrible because the school is too broke to afford and equipment. For Spanish-- a school requirement-- we are pretty much given a dictionary and told to translate words. Another concern of mine is the almost cult-like attitude. Kids who are different are shunned. If you have a view towards the "green lifestyle" that differs from teachers you're put down and told yo're wrong. Overall the education I received was awful and the staff really were not great at all.


Posted November 22, 2012

I am a student at this school, let me just say they do bully a lot over here. starting from 5th grade and up. They focus to much on prairie and plants and all that, but they do not focus on math science or any like that. Our school does not have so much money and so they can not buy any science equipment. I currently go to this school and I would recommend to go somewhere like twin groves in buffalo grove or daniel wright in Lincolnshire.


Posted June 25, 2012

Educational requirements are higher and that is why we chose this school.. the bullying is OUT OF CONTROL.. they have no policy nor course of action for this.. BEWARE... while your child will get more homework and have a higher expectation- it is not worth the hassle.. too many parents are afraid to stand up and take action because its like a cult.. no one wants to go against the adminstration but it is FAR worse than the bullying at Woodland - mainly because at PCCS they turn a blind eye and at Woodland they address the issues right away. Be very careful when looking into this school- much of what they say is smoke and mirrors.. Ask multiple parents and kids before enrolling...
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted January 7, 2012

i love this school so much better than any other stinking schools. they r really boring. not 2 b mean, just my option.


Posted October 26, 2011

This website requires fifteen words. I had planned on just writing one. NIGHTMARE. But there are my fifteen words.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 30, 2011

Some this these reviews are so obviously posted by people who pose as concerned parents but are clearly simply detractors that it's laughable. All schools have pluses and minuses. Our daughter has thrived at PCCS and we have been pleased at the quality of the teachers and the welcoming atmosphere. And give me a break - "our child is gifted and that is why he/she is disruptive"?? Wake up, Parent!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 2, 2011

Our son was a struggling student at Woodland and this wonderful school took him to a level where he is now receiving above average grades. I would take negative comments on this site with a grain of salt, given the unionized area public school teachers are against the experimentation and out-of-the-box thinking employed by these charter schools. Kudos to PC for bringing the area a new brand of public school to our area, we are very lucky to have them in Grayslake.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 18, 2011

My son loves this school but unfortunately the administration and some of those teachers are a big failure. From the principal to the secretary, they just don t know anything about anything. Their organization is very bad and their manners are words. If you try to get some help for your kid with special needs, they will make sure that you don t get it! Their goal is not to help the kids but to keep their jobs. In addition to that, there are some employees that will make sure to make your life miserable any time they can if they don t like you. Customer service is for sure not in their agenda. To be fear, I have to say that some of those teachers are extremely good and helpful and you can see that they love what they do.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 1, 2011

Plusses and minuses. Class size is small; the kids tend to be from families that are very committed to their education. Unique focus on the environment. Students have a variety of experiences not available elsewhere. Parent involvement is high. Open equally to Prairie Crossing residents and others in the surrounding school districts (all are combined equally in a lottery). In the minus column, teacher quality is uneven and the same can be said of the administration; over the past 10+ years we witnessed many changes in staffing; particularly disappointing to see several of the best and most experienced teachers let go over the years for inexplicable reasons. Many of the teachers lack experience. As several others have commented, the school tends to suppress gifted students and this was a huge source of frustration. Ultimately we chose to keep our children there because it was important for us that they be able to walk to school in the neighborhood. In high school our children report that PCCS graduates tend to do well and to be more hardworking/try harder than other students, although they are not generally at the very top of their class.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 28, 2010

There are many wonderful things about this school, but overall the academics do not seem to be the primary focus. Wonderful things: small class sizes, parental involvement, emphasis on being outdoors and physical health of the body as well as environmental awareness, and emphasis on interaction between the class levels (ex, 7th graders teaching 1st graders a block of instruction in plant life cycles). Negatives: Failure on the part of the school and its resources to recognize giftedness as a partial reason for our child's disruptive classroom behavior. I strongly suggest any parent who suspects that their child is gifted seek outside testing. PCCS cannot do the testing, nor will they suggest that option to you even if they suspect a high IQ. The only differentiation for our child was higher grade level reading assignments. The size of the school may impact their ability to implement differentiation in the classroom. PCCS does not have a dedicated gifted program.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 13, 2010

Very poor academics. Principal paid a lot and teachers very little. Math program is very poor.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 25, 2010

Our teachers just made a union because they're underpaid and dont trust the director or principle of the school. Many parents are not happy with whats gone on with the director in the last 2 years and he is being replaced. The school is broke and if teachers want more money it could close the school. Academics are suffering because teachers are not happy and everyone is fighting.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 26, 2010

PCCS is a small family like school with devoted and professional teachers, stuff, principle and director. It has good resource of students with very caring parents. We love the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 3, 2009

Prairie Crossing is a very unique conservation school with a charter that is committed to teach children that importance of preserving our environment for further generations!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 18, 2009

Prairie Crossing is a great school because it has the best teachers who go above and beyond their duties to make sure the kids are in the best learning environment possible. The school is small(22)kids per class and it helps the kids feel comfortable enough to express their true feelings and be themselves. I think that is a really important message.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2009

The school focuses on the caring for the environment. The children take part in a learning farm that is organic. The school stresses community and respect for all students, faculty and parents.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 24, 2009

Prairie Crossing Charter School is an integral part of a conservation community. Students have access to our trails, our playgrounds and our Learning Farm. Teachers are fantastic and many are parents as well as neighborhood residents. Students from outside of the neighborhood ARE allowed, but the school is designed for and around bikers and walkers and parents who can come in to volunteer during the day. There is a closeness to this community. Parents are not required to fundraise but our property values are enhanced by the school and paying $1,200 of the total $11,000 cost is a small price to pay for such a great neighborhood resource!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 24, 2009

This year we took our child out of PCCS and enrolled him in Woodland. PCCS uses looping and multi-age classrooms but does not understand the basic concepts of how to use these wonderful alternatives! Gifted students are crammed down to the least common denominator. My son was constantly bored and in trouble because he was 'daydreaming' after his class assignments were complete, yet he was not allowed to read or do additional work. He was expected to help the others at the expense of challenging himself academically. The director and principal are more of an obstacle than a resource. A few teachers are fantastic but they're being brought down by a negative culture. Charter schools are supposed to be creative and innovative - not PCCS. The director has made this a traditional school and caters to parents who live in the neighborhood and are generous contributors or are on the board.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
98%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
85%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
98%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
98%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
98%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
95%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students84%
Female80%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White83%
Low incomen/a
Not low income84%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities89%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students84%
Female84%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White83%
Low incomen/a
Not low income84%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities92%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students84%
Female88%
Male82%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White89%
Low incomen/a
Not low income84%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities87%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students89%
Female94%
Male85%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White89%
Low incomen/a
Not low income89%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities92%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students96%
Female94%
Male96%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White94%
Low incomen/a
Not low income96%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students86%
Female79%
Male91%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White83%
Low incomen/a
Not low income86%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities86%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students83%
Female79%
Male87%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White80%
Low incomen/a
Not low income83%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities83%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students86%
Female87%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Low incomen/a
Not low income86%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities88%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students80%
Female93%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Low incomen/a
Not low income79%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities83%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students80%
Female70%
Male88%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White79%
Low incomen/a
Not low income80%
Students with disabilities (IEP)60%
Students without disabilities85%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students79%
Female84%
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White81%
Low incomen/a
Not low income79%
Students with disabilities (IEP)40%
Students without disabilities91%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students95%
Female100%
Male91%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Low incomen/a
Not low income95%
Students with disabilities (IEP)80%
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students74%
Female70%
Male83%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White74%
Low incomen/a
Not low income76%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities75%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students92%
Female93%
Male92%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Low incomen/a
Not low income95%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities94%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Above average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

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Math growth at this school

Above average

Reading growth at this school

Above average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 76% 51%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 12% 4%
Two or more races 6% 3%
Hispanic 5% 24%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 0%
Black 1% 18%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Female 43%N/A49%
Male 57%N/A51%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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1531 Jones Point Road
Grayslake, IL 60030
Website: Click here
Phone: (847) 543-9722

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