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GreatSchools Rating

The Joseph Sears School

Public | PK-8

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
No new ratings

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14 reviews of this school


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Posted May 15, 2014

As a student at sears, the new junior High science curriculum and program is highly lacking as is the math program. Very few kids make the high school level math program (infact nobody in my grade did) and the students in red math feel significantly under prepared for high school. In our science class this year we are learning things that the majority of us knew before junior high, such as photo synthesis and and cellular respiration (When I heard we were doing biochemistry I was excited until I learned that we would be spending two months learning what cellular respiration is which could have been taught in a week tops). However the 8th grade social studies teacher is great and I have probably learned more in his class than all my other history and social studies classes before this combined. We have deep and meaningful discussions and I have learned a lot about how to write a good essay and how to properly use quotes in papers. I have also learned a lot and read some great literature in the language art program at sears which is great.


Posted February 17, 2012

We have moved many time over the years, including overseas, and Sears is by far the best school our children have attended. It is not only the teachers, administration and curriculum that make for such a unique and rich experience for our children, but the entire community. It really does take a village, and in Kenilworth and at Joseph Sears, we are fortunate to have a community that truly looks out for, and nurtures, each child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 27, 2010

I validate the 9/11/09 post and last year Sears had a few issues that adminstration and school board took very seriously as appropriate and due to all the end of the year parent survey feedback. This year policies are adhered to more strongly and faculty disclosed more empowerment to do theire jobs even better under new stellar qulity and simple but consistent and true leadership of new principal Dr Powers. Dr. Kalinich is an exceptional magician of a superintendant with graceful skills of managing this exceptional public school almost like a private one, with all the public perks. There is much praise for the studious work of Student Services Director, Dr Noell , that empowers her teams of professional to accomodate learning needs across the spectrum ( although the parents with super gifted students seem to always want more and more). The dedicated PVA/PTA 's work provides enrichment beyond comparison.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 20, 2009

As a former student at Sears, I can say with ease that it gave my classmates and I a significant advantage at New Trier High School over other students from various other schools in the area.


Posted September 15, 2009

I can't imagine a better school experience for my children. This is a great school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 13, 2009

Sears is an awesome school! The Village of Kenilworth is a tight knit community and Sears is the pulse. There is a lot of parent involvement both of time and money, which is the KEY to the success of a Public School. Yes, there is always room for improvement but overall you are hard pressed to find a better school on the North Shore or Chicago-land area.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 10, 2009

This school provides a top-level education in a private-like setting. With less than 600 students and grades pre-K through 8th grade at one location, the whole community supports and participates in school and related activities. I have had two children recently go all the way through school at Sears (they are now in high school). Both received a quality education and tools for success in high school and life. Yes, there have been isolated incidents involving cliques, bullying and entitled parents which get alot of notice because it is such a small community. These problems are everywhere. In my experience, they are related issues as the bullies have parents who won't acknowledge the truth. The school has reacted appropriately to these situations. Anyone considering moving to the North Shore must look at this school and the village of Kenilworth. Your children will have the best in education, sports, and community spirit.'
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 23, 2008

We attended the school for two years and while the academics and teacher ratios were great, the social climate was not. There was a very strong air of entitlement among the kids (and parents) and a focus on how much money they could spend on birthday parties, clothes, etc. We move out of the area to avoid raising our children in that type of money oriented environment. There also was a bullying problem, starting in the third and fourth grade. One girl we knew was taunted by girls for months and the school did not step in to act. The administrators were not very open about discussing it or detailing what their policies are regarding preventing bullying. The problem was also detailed in a local newspaper story. In the end, the great academics did not outweigh the trade off of having to raise a child in that environment.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 20, 2008

This school has an excellent learning environment. The teachers are extremely passionate about educating the children. Everyone is friendly and caring. The programs offered are outstanding, as are the technological resources. This is by far the best school in the area.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 18, 2008

The Joseph Sears School is not what it was many years ago. Bullying is a serious problem within the entire school. Lack of supervision in unsupervised settings is a major problem. Parents totally control the school, and enable administration to act upon discipling children. Teachers are unable to challege students in fear of losing their jobs. Cliques within the community are filtered through the children. Children are ostracized from social setting, sports and extra activities after school. This is not a safe, nuturing environment for a child to learn in.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 2, 2007

Parents (and taxpayers) should expect that this school would have a stellar curriculum focused on strong academics while steering clearing of educational fads and fuzzy methods. Sadly, that is not the case. Like most North Shore schools, Sears revolves around the appearance of quality -- curb-appeal education, we can call it. Grab a copy of the Core Knowledge Sequence (or the popular press equivalent books by E. D. Hirsch) and you'll be in for a shock: it's not clear if Sears comes up to that standard for any subject in any grade! Meanwhile, what you will get for your astoundingly high property taxes is an overall emphasis on process over learning.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 3, 2006

I loved Sears school. We are moving away, and the kids and I will really miss it. The first grade curriculum is so fantastic: so tightly designed, so interesting to the kids. Fifth grade is tough, but all of the teachers did a great job of preparing my daughter to excel in sixth grade. Overall, I couldn't ask for a better education for my kids, private or public!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 16, 2005

Joseph Sears School is an excellent school. However, there are a few issues that need to be addressed. Music program for 3rd and 4th grade is not adequate - needs to be more sophisticated and engaging. Discipline is a concern. Boys fighting on the playground suggests that there are not enough teachers to supervise or teachers supervising are not skilled enough to manage the children. Tenured teachers is a problem (as I imagine it is in most schools). They rewrite the rules to suit their needs. It's happened recently in my child's grade and I am not happy. This is where leadership comes in. The school is in a state of transition. It shows. We are not quite sure whether the principal is staying. We have a new superintendent. Teachers and parents are not sure of what to think. Leadership needs to be stronger to deal with opinionated parents (like me).
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 11, 2003

We were lucky to buy a home in this community when our children were very young. The entire community is centered around the school. The education is outstanding. (I come from a Boston Private schools background so educational standards are extremely important to me.) The social climate of responsibility and caring provides a great foundation for my children. The PreK-8 grade setting maintains the feel of a 'young' school and so you do not get many of the problems of a typical junior high when you get to the older grades. The parent organization runs the school and is phenominal. We have felt extremely welcome here in Kenilworth.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
99%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
98%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
98%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
96%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
98%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
97%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
97%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
96%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
99%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
97%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
93%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students96%
Female93%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Low incomen/a
Non-low income96%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities98%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students88%
Female90%
Male85%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low incomen/a
Non-low income88%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities90%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students94%
Female88%
Male98%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White93%
Low incomen/a
Non-low income94%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities93%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students91%
Female92%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White90%
Low incomen/a
Non-low income91%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities93%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students98%
Female100%
Male98%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White98%
Low incomen/a
Non-low income98%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities98%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students88%
Female85%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White86%
Low incomen/a
Non-low income88%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities91%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students91%
Female88%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White90%
Low incomen/a
Non-low income91%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities95%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students97%
Female100%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Low incomen/a
Non-low income97%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities99%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students96%
Female100%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White96%
Low incomen/a
Non-low income96%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities99%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students84%
Female82%
Male85%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White84%
Low incomen/a
Non-low income84%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities86%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students95%
Female93%
Male96%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White96%
Low incomen/a
Non-low income95%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities98%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Non-low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students89%
Female97%
Male80%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White88%
Low incomen/a
Non-low income89%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities90%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students90%
Female94%
Male87%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low incomen/a
Non-low income90%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities93%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Above average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Math growth at this school

Above average

Reading growth at this school

Above average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 92% 51%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 3% 4%
Two or more races 3% 3%
Hispanic 2% 24%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Black 0% 18%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Dr. Janice Matthews
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
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Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Track
  • Volleyball
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Field hockey
  • Track
  • Volleyball
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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542 Abbotsford Road
Kenilworth, IL 60043
Phone: (847) 256-5006

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