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GreatSchools Rating

Lincoln Middle School

Public | 6-8

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 5 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

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Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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19 reviews of this school


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Posted August 16, 2013

Most of the teachers are great, they have a good communication with students. "The more the teacher connects or communicates with his or her students, the more likely they will be able to help students learn at a high level and accomplish quickly." Unfortunately, some teachers at Lincoln don't really care...
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 16, 2013

There is a lot after school activities for kids, most of the teachers are amazing! Great school!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 16, 2013

Hate to agree with a previous post but there are several teachers there who should do the students a favor and change careers. They seem to be there just counting down to retirement. Now not all of them are like that( Mr. Alms has to be mentioned for his enthusiasm and effectiveness with the students). As for activities, I would say average but nothing special. Coaches in some sports are exceptional. Coaches in other sports are well, let's just say the rec league VOLUNTEER coaches would out coach them. Too bad the district doesn't improve the building. For being Mount Prospect, this school is old and less than ideal. The lunchroom is an underground cave. The locker rooms are gross and the main gym is a joke. Schools in supposedly worse neighboring towns have way better buildings and technology. ( i.e. River Trails and Holmes). Overall, lower than expected for location but I guess it's better than most city schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 15, 2013

I agree with other parents that is "Too many long-term, too-comfortable, ineffective teachers". Some of the teachers are awesome, but most seem like they are there for the above average paycheck.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 1, 2013

I've had three children attend Lincoln and I can't feel more positive about their experience. They have been challenged academically and have learned so much. All have participated in honors courses, which many students are encouraged to do, sports (Mr. Schafer and Ms. Elzer are awesome coaches), and music. The staff, teachers, and administrators are very accessible and extremely dedicated.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 19, 2012

I have two children that go there. One in an enrichment program and another regular student. The curriculum lacks challenges and does not develop the student. It substantially lacks in addressing core writing skills. There is no solid literature program. The science curriculum is weak. No comprehensive text book to form the basics of science is available. On the other hand, the math program, although different from most, is credible and the teachers who teach math do a good job. The enrichment program for weaker students is OUTSTANDING!! Social studies is also a weak program from a curriculum standpoint. The school needs to emphasize personal responsibly and less concern about social development. The kids are are there for an education which includes learning about being responsible and discipline. There are some good teachers, but most seem like they are there for the above average paycheck.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 2, 2011

My daughter had a wonderful experience at Lincoln. Teachers used a team approach to provide a personal environment. She received the tools necessary for great success at Prospect High School, and college next year. They really are dedicated to our children and I feel fortunate to have such a wonderful school in our community!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 11, 2011

I agree with the comments that the teachers are way to comfortable and ineffective. The team concept allows teachers to gang up on students rather than work through issues. The teaching method requires a great deal of homework, 3-4 hours a day. Any minor infraction results in a detention since its the only method they can find to encourage positive behavior. Its not really a positive environment for learning.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 18, 2010

Lincoln Middle School has a wonderful program following with amazing teachers who are dedicated making a difference in the student's lives. Please support this great school!


Posted July 15, 2010

Resting on their Laurels and playing favorites. The mixed reviews that I've read from other parents completely reflects the attitude at Lincoln. If your child happens to be a favorite of the teachers then you will have a great experience at Lincoln. If not, then your child is treated as a non-entity. All of my children have gone to Lincoln. Some with success but one who was not allowed to be successful. He is unfortunately not a favorite of the teachers. Too bad the school received accolades a couple of years ago as they haven't done anything to impress the population since then. Total lack of leadership and no consequences when blatant favoritism by the teachers keeps kids out of activities and from realizing their full potential.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 30, 2010

1) Teachers & curriculum: Too many long-term, too-comfortable, ineffective teachers Science and social studies curricula, and the un-engaging ways they are taught, are pitiful at best, criminal at worst. What a complete turn-off to students during formative years of social and science awareness! 2) Principal leadership Administration is focused on "middle school model" and social needs, when they should be steadily bolstering academics and preparing students for the much more rigorous high school curriculum students will face. Especially for math, micro-focus on metrics seems to keep administration from seeing the forest for the trees, with the result of inappropriate challenge levels for too many students, especially the most talented who are chomping at the bit for more challenges. 3) Parental Involvement Administration and teachers especially all but slam the door in parents' faces. Volunteer opportunities are scarce and fairly meaningless. Teachers dish out lip service, not action, to concerned parents.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 24, 2010

Lincoln Middle School is the best school because I attended jr. high there when I was growing up and my daughter is a current student there. The reason behind my vote is that my daughter is getting the same amazing education that I received which shows how consistent there level is education is. I had an amazing time there and have really great memories and she is having the same experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2009

Excellent staff and administration. Have always gone above and beyond what I would expect for my student
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 21, 2008

The Special Education Extended Support team is excellent. A true collaboration in every respect. Outstanding!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 21, 2008

The Extended Support special education team is outstanding. A true collaboration.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 12, 2008

We re-located to this school district from another state about 11/2 years ago. I have 2 kids with IEP's. Right from the start I had meetings with the 'Team' at Lincoln to plan the daily and weekly schedule that would help my child with specific needs. I was very impressed with the effort, knowledge and kindness that each person on the team put into this plan for my child. I am very grateful for this program, and the people in it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 20, 2008

While Lincoln's Administration tries to help it's students succeed. The Special Ed teachers are bombarded with the District's lack of Special Education leadership. In general, the gen. ed teachers do not embrace accomodations or further themselves to read their students IEP, they would rather not have 'Special Ed' students in their classroom. District 57 does not look to qualify students for Special Ed, instead they poorly attempt umproven interventions. Do not look to this school to praise the good in your child, look for them to only call you when there is a problem.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 30, 2007

As a teacher in another district and having my children attend this district I can truly say that they have wonderful early intervention strategies and programs that help children get on the right track while they are young. The special education program follows what is proven to work with children. The district uses push in as well as pull out to help children and allows them to meet their needs.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 27, 2007

Special ed programs are terrible in this district. Self-contained programs are the preferred method of instruction over inclusion. District does not embrace all children.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
93%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
98%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
95%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
97%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
98%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students82%
Female84%
Male80%
Blackn/a
Asian93%
Hispanic58%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White83%
Low income63%
Non-low income84%
Students with disabilities (IEP)33%
Students without disabilities86%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students81%
Female88%
Male74%
Blackn/a
Asian79%
Hispanic62%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White83%
Low income63%
Non-low income83%
Students with disabilities (IEP)28%
Students without disabilities85%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students74%
Female77%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asian62%
Hispanic58%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White77%
Low income38%
Non-low income79%
Students with disabilities (IEP)16%
Students without disabilities83%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students80%
Female87%
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asian69%
Hispanic74%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Low income59%
Non-low income83%
Students with disabilities (IEP)29%
Students without disabilities88%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students90%
Female97%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asian85%
Hispanic79%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Low income68%
Non-low income93%
Students with disabilities (IEP)48%
Students without disabilities96%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students77%
Female77%
Male76%
Blackn/a
Asian80%
Hispanic70%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White78%
Low income65%
Non-low income78%
Students with disabilities (IEP)21%
Students without disabilities83%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students81%
Female86%
Male76%
Blackn/a
Asian73%
Hispanic78%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White83%
Low income74%
Non-low income81%
Students with disabilities (IEP)21%
Students without disabilities87%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Above average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Math growth at this school

Above average

Reading growth at this school

Above average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 82% 51%
Hispanic 8% 24%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 6% 4%
Two or more races 3% 3%
Black 1% 18%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr. Jason Kaiz

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

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700 West Lincoln Street
Mt Prospect, IL 60056
Phone: (847) 394-7350

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