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GreatSchools Rating

Innovation Academy Charter School

Charter | 5-12 & ungraded | 611 students

 

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Living in Tyngsboro

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $219,900. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,240.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 6 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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26 reviews of this school


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Posted August 12, 2014

The IACS high school is below par as compared to most traditional public or private high schools in the area. This assessment is not based on the fact that IACS high school has graduated only 3 senior classes to date, offers a very limited course selection, and no advanced placement courses at all. The bigger issue is the fact that in their clumsy attempt to copy the teaching methods used in elite private high schools, they are losing focus on teaching the fundamentals of key subjects adequately to the students, in particular in math and sciences. The school has neither the resources nor the proficient teaching staff to successfully implement the project-based teaching approach it claims to follow. At IACS high school, students main source of learning is either the Khan Academy website or their parents, rather than their teachers or textbooks. My advice: if you have a talented student with ambition to attend a good college, consider sending him to other high schools in your area, public or private.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 26, 2013

Innovation Academy Charter School (IACS) offers a stimulating learning environment. Students learn the value of community membership - contributing to the development and betterment of their community - which is practiced by students, teachers and parents. Students also practice project-based learning. They work together as a team, problem solve, and develop the art of doing presentations. They practice effective communication and are conscientious and respectful towards others. Students are encouraged to practice self-direction a critical skill for staying focused and completing tasks on time. I could go on and on about IACS but I'll end here by saying that they are successful as a community because they effectively communicate the value of collaboration, partnership and teamwork in accomplishing successful outcomes. They are a great example of what happens when parents are actively involved with their students' learning -their children accomplish much more and are successful.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 20, 2013

We have a gem of a school for both the children and the parents. The kids are taught to think "outside the box" and not just the traditional way. This allows the kids to think and solve problems using their brains, with minimal help from teachers or parents. I love that they "mentor" each other, not only within their classes, but with students above or below their grades. The teachers are second to none! Not only do they know the students as students, they know them as people and help nurture their individual potential! The communication between teacher and parent is great! Have a question, send them an email! There is a very "family-like" atmosphere here, from the facility workers who go above and beyond to the Principals and everyone in between. They ALL know the kids. The growth of the school over the last year has been amazing. From a state of the art track and field, updated Science rooms, to a brand new 5/6th grade building to accommodate the increased demand of applicants. All mostly done through fundraising! IACS kids are happy. They are community oriented and from the start, are continually groomed for the "real" world. It's the best decision my husband and I ever made!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 18, 2013

This school is all about the student. Not only is the concern on an academic level but also in the areas of Community Membership, Problem Solving, Effective Communication and Self Direction. By concentrating on these five areas, the students become well rounded and mature much faster than traditional schools. By the time my son gave his first Quality Night presentation in the 5th grade, he was addressing strangers, making eye contact, controlling his speech fillers and reading cue cards as if he had been doing it all his life. The transformation was extraordinary an it sold me on the school. The student to teacher ratio is more than adequate and there is help at every turn for the child that has a challenge. I would recommend this school to any parent/guardian who is looking to strengthen any of the areas listed above. It was was I applied, you should too.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 23, 2013

Great school my child has been there for fours years and will attending high school for another 4 years. The teachers and staff are wonderful.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 16, 2013

This school gave me the best four years of my life. The teachers care so much about their students and although they can be tough, there are always other teachers you can go to. As an establishment containing lots of teenagers, there will always be some bullying. However, the school has an environment where the other students and staff will not stand for it. The problem solving skills of everyone in the school are phenomenal. Asides from those social aspects, the honors work works well with the project based nature of the school and throughout one's time there, they are likely to gain wonderful presentation skills that will be incredibly helpful for their future. This school is a challenging one, however, there is extra help available every day from teachers and contact with them is super easy through the school's email system. An important thing is that you have to be motivated at IACS. It is tough but the results are fantastic.


Posted May 27, 2013

Fantastic school. I have 2 children attending and they are both excelling in the small school environment. The teaching staff is second to none and always available to meet with parents. It's all about the kids at this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 28, 2012

There are some wonderful teachers. There are some bad teachers. This school is like any other school in that regard. The project-based curriculum is a step above a typical public school. The overall focus seems to be on expanding the high school, and the middle school gets overlooked. This is not in any way the same school of even 3 years ago. When they expanded to a larger school, they lost some of the magic of what made them special.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 15, 2012

This school needs improvement. They are dismissive with bullying issues, and leave them unresolved. They will choose to simply not respond to parent suggestions for improvement if they do not agree with them. They have little support for advanced learners. They asked parents to give up coffee and cable tv to support their expansion when the middle school is already over-crowded. They are not expanding the middle school building, they are building a track and field, a gym, and expanding the high school. Some athletic programs start so early in the morning that it makes it impossible for some children to participate. Drop-off is a time consuming challenge. The lock down procedure is questionable. Although some (not all) of the teachers at this school are excellent, the school lacks strong administrative leadership. The project based learning structure only supports strong presentation skills and children with behavioral issues who cannot learn in a conventional setting. This environment is disruptive and unsettling to a well behaved child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 2, 2011

Great school. The teachers and students there were great people who were willing to help. They also knew when to have fun with the learning, unlike so many other schools.


Posted June 23, 2011

This school is fantastic. The hands on teaching and focus on student responsibility is unmatched anywhere I have seen. The school prepares students for college and the real world, not just for the MCAS test. The result speak for themselves, consistently higher test scores across the board.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 11, 2010

this school was awful. I went to this school for one year and i hated it. I went for my 8th grade year. After the first months or two i realized how much i hated this school. Now when i went to this school i thought this school was going to be a fun and learning experience. But there were bullies and everything. To be honest there were even potheads and drug dealers. I know a public school obviously has there fair share of potheads but this school had alot of them, and some of them even got caught and all the school did was suspend them for a couple of days then they would be right back in doing there thing. I would never go here ffor a highschool or anything other then just elementary school. I think its a bad choice to have 5-8 in the same school because the big bad 8th graders are obviously going to pick in the little 5th graders. One time i had an issue with a teacher and it made me so mad that i texted my dad and my dad called the school and everything and told them what happened. The school wanted to give me a detention for texting my dad, this is my dad its not like im texting a friend.


Posted November 11, 2010

I hated this school. for science and history you have combined grades. if your in 7th or 8th youll have 8th grade and 7th grade in science and history or for 5th and 6th. it doesnt make sense that you would combine grades because in 8th grade you should be learning more then 7th grade so how could you combine them there two separate grades. I went to a tewksbury school for all my life until 8th grade and i hated the school so i tranfered back to tewksbury high and they tell me i should have learned such and such in 8th grade and i just sit there and say nope i had combined classes so i basicly learned the same stuff as i did in 7th grade.


Posted June 10, 2010

The school is no different than a public shool with regards to name calling and bullying. Most of the teachers are great but you still have your problem teachers. they did make drastic changes since moving to their new building and are no longer the small cozy classroom, the teachers don't have time to work with the children one on one or even in small groups, the kids are left to work within their groups. So its not exactly what everyone at first thinks it is and its not exactly what the portray. So tread softly and be cautious, this is your childs education and you don't want to put them in a school that is not what it appears to be on the outside. My child will not be returning next year it was a year from HE double L
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 6, 2010

This school is amazing. I love how this school does hands on activities instead of reading from the book. It is a much better method then learning from the book. The teachers are real innovators.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 4, 2010

This is a great school, especially if your concerned about your child getting 'lost' in the shuffle or a regular public middle school. The students really learn each subject...I believe this is largely due to the teaching staff and the project base learning. The staff goes out of their way to know your child. They put much emphasis on being a good community member and team member. The communication from the staff is excellent...very proactive. I think there is room for improvement on advertising the school's parent organization..they do alot but it is at times difficult to know how you can get involved. Also be warned that the school has high expectations for its students..you can't slack off and get by...but there is great assistance for any student who is struggling!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 9, 2009

I enjoy going to this school because it is project based. We do projects called rubrics. Also, I like it because our school is pretty much bully free. It is a small amount of students which is great for shy students like me. This is my third year attending and ever since I walked in the door in 5th grade, I have been supported by my peers and teachers.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 23, 2009

This is an incredible school, creating critical thinkers who are great public speakers, community members and problem solvers. This school is creating the next generation of innovators. Go IACS!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 11, 2009

I go here right now. It was awesome the first 3 years here, but now that the high school has moved in, most of the attention seems to be focused on them. There are no Honors classes, and to get a higher grade you don't do better work, just more work. I am really disappointed this year.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 8, 2008

My son has gone here for 2 years and he loves it. The teachers are very dedicated and, because the kids stay with the same class and teachers for two years, they really get to know them. The office staff is very helpful and people always get back to you with an answer on any question.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

104 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
62%
Math

The state average for Math was 61% in 2013.

106 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
62%

2010

 
 
56%
Science

The state average for Science was 51% in 2013.

106 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
44%

2011

 
 
49%

2010

 
 
49%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Massachusetts used the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) to test students in grades 3 though 8 and 10 in English language arts and math and in grades 5, 8, and 10 in science. The grade 10 MCAS is a high school graduation requirement. The MCAS is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Massachusetts. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 67% in 2013.

100 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
81%
Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

100 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
70%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Massachusetts used the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) to test students in grades 3 though 8 and 10 in English language arts and math and in grades 5, 8, and 10 in science. The grade 10 MCAS is a high school graduation requirement. The MCAS is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Massachusetts. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 71% in 2013.

101 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
79%
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

101 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
62%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Massachusetts used the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) to test students in grades 3 though 8 and 10 in English language arts and math and in grades 5, 8, and 10 in science. The grade 10 MCAS is a high school graduation requirement. The MCAS is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Massachusetts. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 78% in 2013.

100 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
87%
Math

The state average for Math was 54% in 2013.

98 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
55%
Science

The state average for Science was 39% in 2013.

98 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
32%

2012

 
 
42%

2011

 
 
41%

2010

 
 
36%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Massachusetts used the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) to test students in grades 3 though 8 and 10 in English language arts and math and in grades 5, 8, and 10 in science. The grade 10 MCAS is a high school graduation requirement. The MCAS is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Massachusetts. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 91% in 2013.

73 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
88%
Math

The state average for Math was 80% in 2013.

73 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
90%
Science

The state average for Science was 71% in 2013.

70 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
83%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Massachusetts used the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) to test students in grades 3 though 8 and 10 in English language arts and math and in grades 5, 8, and 10 in science. The grade 10 MCAS is a high school graduation requirement. The MCAS is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Massachusetts. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

English Language Arts

All Students64%
Female73%
Male55%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White61%
Economically disadvantaged50%
Not economically disadvantaged65%
Title In/a
Students with disabilities24%
English language learnersn/a

Math

All Students60%
Female65%
Male55%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White57%
Economically disadvantaged42%
Not economically disadvantaged61%
Title In/a
Students with disabilities28%
English language learnersn/a

Science

All Students44%
Female47%
Male42%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White43%
Economically disadvantaged41%
Not economically disadvantaged45%
Title In/a
Students with disabilities28%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Massachusetts used the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) to test students in grades 3 though 8 and 10 in English language arts and math and in grades 5, 8, and 10 in science. The grade 10 MCAS is a high school graduation requirement. The MCAS is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Massachusetts. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Massachusetts Department of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

English Language Arts

All Students65%
Female77%
Male53%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White67%
Economically disadvantaged54%
Not economically disadvantaged66%
Title I33%
Students with disabilities24%
English language learnersn/a

Math

All Students74%
Female81%
Male67%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White75%
Economically disadvantaged54%
Not economically disadvantaged77%
Title I53%
Students with disabilities43%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Massachusetts used the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) to test students in grades 3 though 8 and 10 in English language arts and math and in grades 5, 8, and 10 in science. The grade 10 MCAS is a high school graduation requirement. The MCAS is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Massachusetts. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Massachusetts Department of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

English Language Arts

All Students75%
Female95%
Male56%
African Americann/a
Asian91%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White74%
Economically disadvantaged57%
Not economically disadvantaged78%
Title I40%
Students with disabilities47%
English language learnersn/a

Math

All Students66%
Female80%
Male50%
African Americann/a
Asian81%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White64%
Economically disadvantaged43%
Not economically disadvantaged69%
Title I33%
Students with disabilities14%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Massachusetts used the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) to test students in grades 3 though 8 and 10 in English language arts and math and in grades 5, 8, and 10 in science. The grade 10 MCAS is a high school graduation requirement. The MCAS is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Massachusetts. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Massachusetts Department of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

English Language Arts

All Students86%
Female98%
Male78%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White86%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged89%
Title I65%
Students with disabilities63%
English language learnersn/a

Math

All Students74%
Female78%
Male71%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White73%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged77%
Title I25%
Students with disabilities50%
English language learnersn/a

Science

All Students32%
Female31%
Male32%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White29%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged33%
Title I6%
Students with disabilities13%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Massachusetts used the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) to test students in grades 3 though 8 and 10 in English language arts and math and in grades 5, 8, and 10 in science. The grade 10 MCAS is a high school graduation requirement. The MCAS is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Massachusetts. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Massachusetts Department of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

English Language Arts

All Students99%
Female100%
Male98%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged98%
Title In/a
Students with disabilities94%
English language learnersn/a

Math

All Students88%
Female85%
Male91%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White90%
Economically disadvantaged80%
Not economically disadvantaged89%
Title In/a
Students with disabilities58%
English language learnersn/a

Science

All Students85%
Female87%
Male85%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White86%
Economically disadvantaged70%
Not economically disadvantaged89%
Title In/a
Students with disabilities73%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Massachusetts used the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) to test students in grades 3 though 8 and 10 in English language arts and math and in grades 5, 8, and 10 in science. The grade 10 MCAS is a high school graduation requirement. The MCAS is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Massachusetts. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Massachusetts Department of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

Biology

The state average for Biology was 73% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Chemistry

The state average for Chemistry was 65% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Introductory Physics

The state average for Introductory Physics was 63% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Tech/Engineering

The state average for Tech/Engineering was 49% in 2013.

96 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
66%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Massachusetts used the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System Science and Technology/Engineering Tests (MCAS STE) to test students in high school in biology, chemistry, introductory physics and technology/engineering. The MCAS STE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Massachusetts. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Title In/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English language learnersn/a

Chemistry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Title In/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English language learnersn/a

Introductory Physics

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Title In/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English language learnersn/a

Tech/Engineering

All Students76%
Female76%
Male76%
African Americann/a
Hispanicn/a
White81%
Economically disadvantaged50%
Not economically disadvantaged80%
Title In/a
Students with disabilities61%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Massachusetts used the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System Science and Technology/Engineering Tests (MCAS STE) to test students in high school in biology, chemistry, introductory physics and technology/engineering. The MCAS STE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Massachusetts. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Massachusetts Department of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Average

Test score rating
Student growth rating
College readiness rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

24%
of schools in the state are Below average
50%
of schools in the state are Average
26%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in Massachusetts. Test scores are based on 2012-13 MCAS results from the state of Massachusetts.

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Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

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Math growth at this school

Average

Reading growth at this school

Average


College readiness rating 20133What's this?

College readiness rating combines this high school's graduation rates with data about college entrance exams, both of which are indicators of how well schools are preparing students for success in college and beyond.

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SAT participation

53%

Average SAT score

1656

Graduation rate

90%


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 MCAS results from the state of Massachusetts.

2 This rating is based on 2011-12 and 2012-13 Median Growth Percentiles in Math and English Language Arts from the state of Massachusetts.

3 This rating is based on composite SAT scores, SAT participation (% of 11th graders taking the SAT), and four-year adjusted graduation rates from 2012-13.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 84% 67%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 6% 6%
Hispanic 4% 16%
Black 3% 8%
Two or more races 3% 3%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Male 53%N/A51%
Students participating in free or reduced-price lunch program 13%N/A35%
Female 47%N/A49%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

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School basics

Fax number
  • (978) 970-3522

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

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72 Tyng Rd
Tyngsboro, MA 01879
Website: Click here
Phone: (978) 649-0432

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