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GreatSchools Rating

Toy Town Elementary School

Public | 3-5 & ungraded

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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11 reviews of this school


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Posted April 5, 2014

I posted before, about my daughter, who was in grade 3. Since she started, my child's grades went way down. Not because she didn't apply herself or didn't care, but because the teacher and her teaching method. This teacher would teach a subject, and give the children one day to learn it.My child was left behind, I don't know if her teacher assumed she understood or she ignored her. But, her teacher was teaching her comprehension. My child was constantly getting the questions wrong. I went over comprehension with my child and asked how the teacher taught her. It made no sense! So, I taught my child a better way...my child nailed it. The teacher isn't explaining thing to the children they understand, rather easier for her. this teacher just seems to want to get her job done and get out. When my child brought her healthy lunch in, from home, the kids commented how gross it was that she ate healthy food. I could give way more examples, but this school just set a horrible example for my child! I took her out, last week, and put her back into her private school. She has all her friends back! She is happy! She is extremely happy! Toy Town doesn't care about your child or their future.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 11, 2013

Toy Town Elementary My grandson attends Toy Town Elementary. I am thrilled to see him progress and prosper, because of Winchendon's school sytsem. I feel the teachers and staff are top notch. I feel they genuinely care about the education of all the children. The programs are excellent and am thankful my grandson(s) have the privilege to be educated by the teachers at the Winchendon Schools. A proud grandmother.


Posted March 18, 2013

The staff at this school is amazing. They care about the childrens' happiness and well being. Their academic success is also a top priotity. Students of all abilities are challenged and encouraged.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 3, 2012

There are many mean kids in this school, unfortunately the staff are not always aware of it. Unless you have a child who is very strong and vocal, your child might be getting quietly bullied. You have to be a very assertive parent in order to be listened to. If your child is well behaved and good academically, then he/she may very well be ignored because there are too many other children who fall behind and need attention. When you bring up a concern to the teachers or staff, they will more likely make you feel that it is your responsibility. Just be a very keen parent if you want your child to succeed in this school. About the PE teacher...my daughter was his student and he scared her so much. My daughter developed such a negative attitude towards PE and sports in general. She also developed a belief that she is no good in sports. Her self-esteem was affected very much. We as parents had to intervene. She does not go to that school anymore.


Posted September 25, 2012

I agree with the parent who commented on the PE teacher. HE is very mean and yells @ the kids if they don't do it right the first time and is very vocal and can make kids cry without consoling them. As a proffessional he shouldn't be a PEBteacher but an Army recruiter. I mthink he should be evaluated and his peers need to listen to the parents who listen to their kids. Gym should be fun and a release for kids. Not to feal fear and not want to go to school on the days they have gym.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 25, 2011

Teachers there are wonderful. Both my kids were and are honor students. What I believe they need to work on is, how to return calls to parents when parents call them in regards to situations that have to do with their children. I have heard many posistive things about the teachers their, except for the gym coach. I believe that he needs to take anger management class or they need to hired someone else's that enjoys being around kids. He has yelled at the kids, make them cry and say unnecessary remarks/comments to them or about their class. So if your child is going there it is important to listen to your child when they come home and tell you things like that. I happen to be one of the parents that do call in and complain. Not only for my children but for other children and teachers there that he happens to bad mouth. My children loves it there but because of a situation like that, they tell me they don't want to attend the school there and want to move back to their old school! Till today the coach has not apologize to the students or the teacher! Other than this situation the teachers there take the time to get to know their students and focus on them. Very kind and helpful.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 21, 2011

My daughter has been going to winchendon schools since kindergarden, and she absolutley loves it here. The teachers are wonderful, she has been on the honor roll since 2nd grade. The town is great, I wouldn't want to be anywhere else.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 8, 2008

As a parent over the past two years I have seen that most of the emphasis is on training kids to take the MCAS. I feel they should be schooled in the basics and at a level that pushes them. Most of the classes are based on the overall ability of the class not the individual. I don't like the idea that the students are praised and penalized as a whole. If one student is good or bad they should be handled as an individual.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 8, 2008

Good small town school. Teachers are professional, and they try very hard.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 20, 2005

There have been a great number of positive changes at this school within the past 8 months! While the Massachusetts State Board of Education mandated that multi-age teams be transitioned into a differential instruction in every classroom, these changes have influenced the staff and the children in many positive ways! Though the music and arts programs remain small, they are of quality. This school now also offers a very well-funded after school program with more extracurricular activities spread throughout the community. As of Sept 2005, the PTO is aligned with school goals and is welcoming and has the active participation of not only parents but several teachers and administrators as well! Great Improvements!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 26, 2005

Multi-level age groups will be non-existant Sept. 2005 and there is no TAG program available. Chapter 70 students dictate classroom structure leaving above average children bored, and unable to move ahead. Music program is small. Musical instruments are optional therefore, not many children participate. Level of parental involvment overwhelmingly competitive - too many fundraisers - school needs great improvement. Cohesion between parent/teacher needs improvement. Administration changes within the past two years has been high and added to the confusion of leadership. This school, while in the turn-around plan, has had many parents turning around and heading out the door with their children in tow.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

90 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
57%

2011

 
 
48%

2010

 
 
51%
Math

The state average for Math was 67% in 2013.

90 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
48%

2010

 
 
57%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Massachusetts used the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) to test students in grades 3 though 8 and 10 in English language arts and math and in grades 5, 8, and 10 in science. The grade 10 MCAS is a high school graduation requirement. The MCAS is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Massachusetts. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 53% in 2013.

111 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
38%

2012

 
 
40%

2011

 
 
33%

2010

 
 
27%
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

110 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
30%

2011

 
 
35%

2010

 
 
30%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Massachusetts used the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) to test students in grades 3 though 8 and 10 in English language arts and math and in grades 5, 8, and 10 in science. The grade 10 MCAS is a high school graduation requirement. The MCAS is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Massachusetts. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

124 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
47%

2011

 
 
43%

2010

 
 
43%
Math

The state average for Math was 61% in 2013.

124 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
46%

2011

 
 
40%

2010

 
 
36%
Science

The state average for Science was 51% in 2013.

124 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
44%

2011

 
 
49%

2010

 
 
44%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Massachusetts used the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) to test students in grades 3 though 8 and 10 in English language arts and math and in grades 5, 8, and 10 in science. The grade 10 MCAS is a high school graduation requirement. The MCAS is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Massachusetts. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

English Language Arts

All Students44%
Female51%
Male38%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White45%
Economically disadvantaged28%
Not economically disadvantaged58%
Title I44%
Students with disabilities9%
English language learnersn/a

Math

All Students52%
Female53%
Male51%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White54%
Economically disadvantaged35%
Not economically disadvantaged66%
Title I52%
Students with disabilities45%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Massachusetts used the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) to test students in grades 3 though 8 and 10 in English language arts and math and in grades 5, 8, and 10 in science. The grade 10 MCAS is a high school graduation requirement. The MCAS is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Massachusetts. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Massachusetts Department of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

English Language Arts

All Students38%
Female37%
Male39%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White38%
Economically disadvantaged33%
Not economically disadvantaged42%
Title I38%
Students with disabilities15%
English language learnersn/a

Math

All Students39%
Female28%
Male51%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
White41%
Economically disadvantaged28%
Not economically disadvantaged49%
Title I39%
Students with disabilities15%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Massachusetts used the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) to test students in grades 3 though 8 and 10 in English language arts and math and in grades 5, 8, and 10 in science. The grade 10 MCAS is a high school graduation requirement. The MCAS is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Massachusetts. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Massachusetts Department of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

English Language Arts

All Students53%
Female53%
Male53%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic40%
Multiracialn/a
White54%
Economically disadvantaged47%
Not economically disadvantaged59%
Title I53%
Students with disabilities24%
English language learnersn/a

Math

All Students39%
Female40%
Male40%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic30%
Multiracialn/a
White41%
Economically disadvantaged30%
Not economically disadvantaged47%
Title I39%
Students with disabilities12%
English language learnersn/a

Science

All Students54%
Female53%
Male53%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic30%
Multiracialn/a
White57%
Economically disadvantaged42%
Not economically disadvantaged63%
Title I54%
Students with disabilities41%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Massachusetts used the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) to test students in grades 3 though 8 and 10 in English language arts and math and in grades 5, 8, and 10 in science. The grade 10 MCAS is a high school graduation requirement. The MCAS is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Massachusetts. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Massachusetts Department of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Below average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

24%
of schools in the state are Below average
50%
of schools in the state are Average
26%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in Massachusetts. Test scores are based on 2012-13 MCAS results from the state of Massachusetts.

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District
State
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9
10

Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
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8
9
10

Math growth at this school

Below Average

Reading growth at this school

Below Average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 MCAS results from the state of Massachusetts.

2 This rating is based on 2011-12 and 2012-13 Median Growth Percentiles in Math and English Language Arts from the state of Massachusetts.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 84% 67%
Hispanic 7% 16%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 3% 6%
Two or more races 3% 3%
Black 2% 8%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students participating in free or reduced-price lunch program 48%N/A35%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

Fax number
  • (978) 297-3011

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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175 Grove St
Winchendon, MA 01475
Phone: (978) 297-2005

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