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GreatSchools Rating

Ernest W. Seaholm High School

Public | 9-12 & ungraded | 1278 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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12 reviews of this school


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Posted March 16, 2014

Pro's Safe school Con's Trimester schedule with 70 minute classes is not as good as semesters. Staff is not professional or friendly toward students or parents. Teachers expect kids to teach themselves by watching videos and using google. Teachers verbally attack students, have their obvious "favorites" and have been caught following porn sites on class social media accounts. Half to three-quarters of the student body come from very rich families and look down on the less fortunate students all while raising money for the "poor" to gain community service hours and attract local media attention. Average to below average students are ignored while advanced placement/honors students (usually the students' whose parents are paying for tutoring by a teacher in the district) are celebrated. Teachers and staff protect one another when mistakes or inappropriate behavior is identified. This protectionism attitude goes all the way to the top positions in the district's administration. The school and district will hide/ignore many things in an attempt to protect the public reputation of the district even at the expense of student well being.


Posted March 6, 2014

I am a student at Seaholm currently, and I really enjoying a lot of the teachers here, though many I think could do better. I am torn because I feel half of the student body are very kind, caring, and open, while the others are exactly the opposite. I definitely would believe it would be hard to come to this school from out of state and not knowing anyone previously, because people have "friend groups" already. The classes are very challenging (good) and a lot of the students have parents who push them to do well, and so they do. Some students expect they're going to ivy league colleges or something. Some days I feel as though I would recommend the school and other days no. I also feel as though everything is ultra-competitive, and other students or even staff judge you if you get one bad grade on an assignment or if you don't have the latest designer clothing trends and cell phone. One thing that stood out to me is that 4 times in one trimester different teachers of mine were absent, and substitute teachers never showed up!!! The school did nothing about it. As I mentioned previously, I feel some days I would recommend it and other days I wouldn't. -Student
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 7, 2013

I love Seaholm its a great place to learn at they use different teaching methods so everyone can benefit from each class. Everyone is so nice and everyone can find friends. I always feel really prepared for tests and exams I love it come join the Seaholm community. FEAR THE LEAF!
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 16, 2012

As a parent, I want my child to have the best education possible that can allow them to be themselves. It is the exact opposite at seaholm. My son told me that it is almost impossible to be creative and yourself at seaholm because of the way you will be judged by the students and staff. He seemed to only get bad grades because of the teachers not liking who he was and not because of his intelligence. He would cry some nights because he wouldn't fit in. Please do not allow your children to go to seaholm.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 16, 2012

Please don't let your child go to this school it is the worst thing that has ever happened to me. I am constantly watched and judged by the staff just by the way my friends and I look.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 14, 2012

First, let me start out with the positive. Coming from a private middle school, I wasn't sure if Seaholm would be a great fit, especially since I'm rather shy. Luckily, I assimilated pretty well into the school, but I actually had to do most of the work of meeting new people...many students here are stuck in their "Birmingham Bubble" and really don't care about anything or anyone outside of the city limits. I'd say half the body is rather naive, while the other half is accepting and friendly. Most of the students strive to achieve and the atmosphere is competitive. There are plenty of clubs, the building is beautiful, and the classes are challenging, but the English program could use some strengthening. Let me also say that trimesters are the worst! No one likes them and it is horrible to have a class 1st and 3rd trimester, since you forget all the material in second tri. There are amazing teachers and horrible teachers, it really depends on the subject area (Most of the math teachers are bad) . Seaholm expects that every student is going to be an engineer or doctor, and there is little creativity. Looking back, I would have chosen a more diverse, accepting school like Groves.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 3, 2010

As an educator in a different school district, I can honestly say that my two children have recieved and exemplary education in Birmingham MI schools. Seaholm is the third Birmingham school they've attended, and we are completely satisfied, happy really, with the school. The teachers and counselors are engaged, and the principals are all involved in various school activities-it's obvious they truly care about Seaholm students and families. My daughter has 4 AP classes under her belt, and has been accepted at UM and MSU. My son is above average now as a sophomore- thanks to his great teachers.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 21, 2009

I was astonished at what a terrible school this was. I am so glad that I was fortunate to be able to leave! The whole idea of the Trimesters was completely ridiculous, I went from an A's and B's student at my previous private school to a C and D student at Seaholm because of these 'Trimesters.' It sounds ideal until the horrific teachers start their lesson plans that are compacted to fit so much in because of the trimesters. If you were like my family and moved to Birmingham for the good education and or were thinking about moving for the good education I would strongly recommend looking elsewhere.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 5, 2008

Excellent school with overall excellent teachers, extra curricular activities both athletic and non-athletic.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 21, 2006

One of few schools that offers chinese language classes. Many AP classes.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 28, 2005

I go to Seaholm. Im happy there, but I know I could be happier somewhere else. There's barely any diversity. It has a feeling of old money and white dominance. I have learned to fit in here and find friends, but I enjoy getting out and meeting people form other schools. Students are given many educational opportunities there but are reraly acted upon, yet it would be unfair to say that they are not. Some of the staff is exceptional, and some I don't know how they obtained a teaching degree. The school could be so much more but attitude gets in the way, with education and athletics. Overall, it is a cold, snoody, atmosphere.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 5, 2004

Both of my children graduated from Seaholm. Many teachers and several staff offered friendly, professional encouragement to both in both academic and social realms. Seaholm has an interdisciplinary program called 'FLEX' led by teachers who exemplified this spirit. Unfortunately, many administrators and teachers who have not participated have a negative opinion of the program, not (in my opinion) based on reality. Student alumni, including my children, overwhelmingly credit FLEX with preparing them very well for college, by encouraging them to approach their studies critically and seriously.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 26% in 2014.

328 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
49%

2013

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
57%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2013-2014 Michigan used the Michigan Educational Assessment Program (MEAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in math, reading and writing; in grades 5 and 8 in science; and in grades 6 and 9 in social studies. Currently, GreatSchools' ratings reflect 2013 MEAP results; ratings will be updated after 2014 Michigan Merit Examination (MME) results are released. The MEAP is a standards-based test, which measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Michigan. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level.

Beginning in the 2011-2012 school year, the Michigan State Board of Education implemented new definitions of what it means to be proficient on the MEAP test. In addition, they have recalculated past years' results using these new standards for proficiency, making the above year-over-year results comparable.

Source: Michigan Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 29% in 2014.

315 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
70%

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
66%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2014.

317 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
87%

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
83%
Science

The state average for Science was 28% in 2014.

314 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
49%

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
52%

2011

 
 
44%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 44% in 2014.

314 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
64%

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
56%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 51% in 2014.

317 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
88%

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
80%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2013-2014 Michigan used the Michigan Merit Examination (MME) to assess students in grade 11 in reading, writing, math, science and social studies. The MME is a standards-based test, which measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Michigan. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Beginning in the 2011-2012 school year, the Michigan State Board of Education implemented new definitions of what it means to be proficient on the MME test. In addition, they have recalculated past years' results using these new standards for proficiency, making the above year-over-year results comparable.

Source: Michigan Department of Education

Math

All Students70%
Female70%
Male70%
African Americann/a
Asian69%
Hispanic80%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White70%
Economically disadvantaged31%
Students with disabilities13%
Students without disabilities73%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Homelessn/a

Reading

All Students87%
Female90%
Male84%
African American80%
Asian85%
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White87%
Economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilities56%
Students without disabilities89%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Homelessn/a

Science

All Students49%
Female50%
Male48%
African Americann/a
Asian46%
Hispanic40%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White50%
Economically disadvantaged19%
Students with disabilities19%
Students without disabilities51%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Homelessn/a

Social Studies

All Students64%
Female60%
Male69%
African Americann/a
Asian62%
Hispanic70%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White64%
Economically disadvantaged44%
Students with disabilities19%
Students without disabilities67%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Homelessn/a

Writing

All Students88%
Female95%
Male80%
African American80%
Asian69%
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White89%
Economically disadvantaged56%
Students with disabilities44%
Students without disabilities90%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Homelessn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2013-2014 Michigan used the Michigan Merit Examination (MME) to assess students in grade 11 in reading, writing, math, science and social studies. The MME is a standards-based test, which measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Michigan. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Beginning in the 2011-2012 school year, the Michigan State Board of Education implemented new definitions of what it means to be proficient on the MME test. In addition, they have recalculated past years' results using these new standards for proficiency, making the above year-over-year results comparable.

Source: Michigan Department of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Above average

Test score rating
College readiness rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

19%
of schools in the state are Below average
55%
of schools in the state are Average
26%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in Michigan. Test scores are based on 2012-13 MEAP results from the state of Michigan.

Close
This school
District
State
1
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3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

College readiness rating 20132What's this?

College readiness rating combines this high school's graduation rates with data about college entrance exams, both of which are indicators of how well schools are preparing students for success in college and beyond.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

ACT participation

97%

Average ACT score

24

Graduation rate

>95%


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 MEAP results from the state of Michigan.

2 This rating is based on composite ACT scores from 2012-13 and four-year adjusted graduation rates from 2011-12. ACT participation represents the percentage of 11th graders taking the ACT. Because the ACT is mandated in Michigan high schools, ACT participation is NOT included in the GreatSchools rating.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 88% 69%
African-American 5% 18%
Asian 3% 3%
Hispanic 2% 6%
Multiracial 1% 2%
American Indian 0% 1%
Native Hawaiian 0% 0%
Source: MI Dept. of Education, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 6%N/A48%
Source: MI Dept. of Education, 2012-2013

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Ms. Deanna Barash
Fax number
  • (248) 203-3706

Programs

Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Special education
School leaders can update this information here.
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

2436 West Lincoln St
Birmingham, MI 48009
Website: Click here
Phone: (248) 203-3702

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