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GreatSchools Rating

Highland Park Senior High School

Public | 9-12 | 1373 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 4 ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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12 reviews of this school


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Posted July 24, 2014

Highland is great if your kid can keep up with the IB program and has no difficulties with truancy or tardiness. Otherwise, this school is a low-expectations and correspondingly low results sorry situation. Although it might be one of the better public high schools in St Paul (sadly). There are no consequences to kids who don't show up or are repeatedly tardy. Since many kids in the regular classes don't do their homework, the pace of the curriculum is lethargic and class discussion engagement is anemic. The teachers want to teach, but without a change in school culture, it is a place where the average or below average motivated student goes to become even less motivated. The school is safe, kids are generally pleasant to each other. But if your kid is not fairly bright and self-motivated (and thus in the IB program) look instead to a well-reviewed free charter school or parochial school (they have scholarships), where your child will have a desk, be surrounded by kids who are trying regardless of their IQ level, and surrounded by teachers and administrators with high expectations and support/consequences for getting to class on time, getting your homework done, behaving well.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 16, 2014

This school is particularly bad for boys. It makes them feel like losers. If you have a boy choose any school over Highland.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 11, 2014

Highland Park has been a wonderful school for my sons. The IB program is the best in the city, and the staff and faculty work to make the requirements easy to fulfill. The smaller size of the school means more leadership opportunities for students and also a supportive environment. My kids have had really great teachers. I highly recommend Highland.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 2, 2014

Highland jr and sr high are the most disappointing schools in St. Paul . Principles that look good on paper but you will never see them or hear back. Charlene Hoff is the worse I have met yet. Principles set the tone for schools so no wonder highland is full of teachers who are there just to collect paychecks it is unfortunate. The allow teachers to physically write on students arms with permanent marker and make spectacles of students that may do as well as others. Also lots of stereotypes and segregation in these schools. I recommend Ramsey and Central to everyone. They are considered inner city schools but I promise there principles are amazing people and academically scored above Highland always !!!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 7, 2010

Like many very large high schools, this is a good place to send a good student. My daughter was by nature a very intelligent, hardworking, eager student and she had a great experience at this school. She enjoyed the challenge of both Spanish immersion (for students already fluent in Spanish) and IB (and it's plethora of tests, papers and homework). The school was both safe and culturally diverse. As a large public school they provide good facilities for science, sports and the higher cost disciplines. Having said all that, we chose not to send our son there. As a non-traditional student we were concerned he would have been lost. As you read in other reviews that are more negative, these large "cost effective" schools can be swamps for students who need attention and support. A society that believes they should be able to cheaply educate children get what they pay for.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 17, 2009

Not too happy with some of the teachers - and IEP issues. I wonder how to find a school that actual cares about our children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 21, 2009

I am currently a junior at this school, and I truly believe that it offers the best education of any public school in this district. Highland offers the IB program, and has one of the highest percentage of IB exams taken per senior in the state. IB classes are very rigorous, and all my teachers are able and willing to help me succeed in this program, as well as in life. Highland is a diverse school that is highly connected to the real world. Ex. I am currently studying Spanish and Chinese.There are so many opportunities for extracurricular activities, too. Just to name a few: Model United Nations, Thespian Society, Math team, Literary Magazine, Gay-Straight Alliance, Student Council, Anime club, not to mention all the sports. Highland is a place where I feel like I belong. My only criticism is that the class sizes are getting too big.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 12, 2009

I think sending any child to this school would be a horrible mistake. There are only a handful of good teachers at this school, the majority of them really don't care about problems their students are having unless the issue is brought to them by a parent. They are constantly changing the curriculum of classes in the middle of the course, which makes it harder are both the teachers and the students. The school continues to admit more students than it can possibly hold, there is nowhere near enough room in the classes to hold all the students in them. There is not one good thing I can say about this school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 9, 2005

The class sizes at this school are much too large- classes often exceed 35 students per teacher. Additionally, the school begins much too early, and I believe that this inhibits students' chances for success. The block scheduling is not conducive to learning. It makes the continued study of subjects such as language and math difficult, and the length of classes occasionally becomes unbearable. While there are good classes available, the quailty of teachers can be hit or miss. The same is true for extracurriculars. While some are well established and enjoyable, others are disorganized and frusturating to be a part of.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 1, 2004

I graduated from this school, and I think it was great. There are over 20 different extracurricular activities, not only in sports, but in other areas as well, like the math team which is on first place in the state. It is true that the school is really big, thus I highly recommend that students try to be part of the IB program. Because it is a small community of students, and it prepares them for college in a very efficient way. I graduated recently (on 2004) and I think it is easy to succed in this school.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted October 1, 2004

My daughter is a sophmore at Highland Park Senior. She is in her third year on the swim team. Last spring she was on the badmitten team and this spring intends to go out for the track team. There are many opportunities for girls to participate in sports (soccer, basketball, volleyball etc.) as well as drama, music (choral and band) and student government. The spanish immersion program she began in kindergarten continues through high school. She is bilingual thanks to this program and has been recieving an excellent education. I do agree that school starts too early and am glad the prinicipal is looking at changing the 4 period day which is too limiting for kids involved in music or second languages.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 28, 2004

School starts at an ungodly early hour and the block scheduling limits class choices. Other than male sports, there are few opportunities for extracurricular activities. As the school is large, and due to the lack of extracurricular offerings and seeing that the school gets out so early, students are placed at a higher risk of using their after school time unproductively making it imperative that you be vigilant and know who your child is associating with. Parent teacher conferences are frustrating. Making appointments to see teachers are speficic times is totally ignored. I was often kept waiting in long lines to talk with teachers. My very bright child did not succeed here but is now doing well in a smaller charter school environment.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Writing

The state average for Writing was 88% in 2013.

291 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
83%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Minnesota used Minnesota Comprehensive Assessment-II Graduation-Required Assessments for Diploma (MCA-II/GRAD) to test students in grade 9 in writing and 11 in math. The MCA-II/GRAD is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Minnesota. Students must pass the MCA-II/GRAD in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Minnesota Department of Education

Reading

The state average for Reading was 80% in 2012.

313 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
62%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Minnesota used Minnesota Comprehensive Assessment-II Graduation-Required Assessments for Diploma (MCA-II/GRAD) to test students in grade 9 in writing and 11 in math. The MCA-II/GRAD is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Minnesota. Students must pass the MCA-II/GRAD in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Minnesota Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

282 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
49%

2011

 
 
41%

2010

 
 
51%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Minnesota used Minnesota Comprehensive Assessment-II Graduation-Required Assessments for Diploma (MCA-II/GRAD) to test students in grade 9 in writing and 11 in math. The MCA-II/GRAD is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Minnesota. Students must pass the MCA-II/GRAD in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Minnesota Department of Education

Writing

All Students86%
Female90%
Male83%
Black78%
Asian93%
Hispanic73%
Native Americann/a
White95%
Economically disadvantaged75%
Not economically disadvantaged95%
Students with disabilities41%
Students without disabilities91%
English language learners66%
Proficient in English91%
Not migrant86%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Minnesota used Minnesota Comprehensive Assessment-II Graduation-Required Assessments for Diploma (MCA-II/GRAD) to test students in grade 9 in writing and 11 in math. The MCA-II/GRAD is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Minnesota. Students must pass the MCA-II/GRAD in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Minnesota Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data is not reported for that group.

Source: Minnesota Department of Education

Math

All Students53%
Female52%
Male53%
Black30%
Asian62%
Hispanic33%
Native Americann/a
White74%
Economically disadvantaged37%
Not economically disadvantaged72%
Students with disabilities13%
Students without disabilities56%
English language learners21%
Proficient in English56%
Not migrant53%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Minnesota used Minnesota Comprehensive Assessment-II Graduation-Required Assessments for Diploma (MCA-II/GRAD) to test students in grade 9 in writing and 11 in math. The MCA-II/GRAD is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Minnesota. Students must pass the MCA-II/GRAD in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Minnesota Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data is not reported for that group.

Source: Minnesota Department of Education

Reading

The state average for Reading was 77% in 2012.

313 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
57%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Minnesota used the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessment-II (MCA-II) to test students in math in grade 11. The MCA-II is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Minnesota. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Minnesota Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

282 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
40%

2011

 
 
33%

2010

 
 
32%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Minnesota used the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessment-II (MCA-II) to test students in math in grade 11. The MCA-II is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Minnesota. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Minnesota Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 54% in 2011.

342 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
44%

2010

 
 
30%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Minnesota used the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessment-II (MCA-II) to test students in math in grade 11. The MCA-II is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Minnesota. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Minnesota Department of Education

Reading

The state average for Reading was 62% in 2013.

281 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Minnesota used the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessment-III (MCA-III) to test in math in grades 3 through 8 in reading in grades 3 through 8 and 10 and in science for grades 5 and 8, and once in high school. The MCA-III is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Minnesota. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Minnesota Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 53% in 2013.

322 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
36%

2012

 
 
35%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Minnesota used the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessment-III (MCA-III) to test in math in grades 3 through 8 in reading in grades 3 through 8 and 10 and in science for grades 5 and 8, and once in high school. The MCA-III is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Minnesota. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Minnesota Department of Education

Reading

All Students54%
Female54%
Male55%
Black29%
Asian39%
Hispanic52%
Native Americann/a
White76%
Economically disadvantaged34%
Not economically disadvantaged75%
Students with disabilities20%
Students without disabilities57%
English language learners14%
Proficient in English60%
Not migrant54%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Minnesota used the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessment-III (MCA-III) to test in math in grades 3 through 8 in reading in grades 3 through 8 and 10 and in science for grades 5 and 8, and once in high school. The MCA-III is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Minnesota. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Minnesota Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data is not reported for that group.

Source: Minnesota Department of Education

Science

All Students36%
Female35%
Male37%
Black14%
Asian29%
Hispanic21%
Native Americann/a
White56%
Economically disadvantaged14%
Not economically disadvantaged55%
Students with disabilities3%
Students without disabilities40%
English language learners3%
Proficient in English41%
Not migrant36%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Minnesota used the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessment-III (MCA-III) to test in math in grades 3 through 8 in reading in grades 3 through 8 and 10 and in science for grades 5 and 8, and once in high school. The MCA-III is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Minnesota. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Minnesota Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data is not reported for that group.

Source: Minnesota Department of Education

Math

All Students41%
Female40%
Male41%
Black13%
Asian43%
Hispanic30%
Native Americann/a
White65%
Economically disadvantaged21%
Not economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilities9%
Students without disabilities43%
English language learners7%
Proficient in English44%
Not migrant41%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Minnesota used the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessment-II (MCA-II) to test students in math in grade 11. The MCA-II is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Minnesota. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Minnesota Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data is not reported for that group.

Source: Minnesota Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 36% 73%
Black 27% 9%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 19% 6%
Hispanic 15% 7%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Two or more races 1% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 55%N/A37%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Assistant principal(s)
ELL/ESL Coordinator
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Nurse(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
Music
  • Instrumental music lessons
Performing and written arts
  • Dance
  • Drama

Language learning

Staff resources available to students
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Nurse(s)
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

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by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Winston Tucker
Fax number
  • (651) 293-8939

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Nurse(s)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Cafeteria
  • Library
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Soccer
  • Swimming
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Soccer
  • Tennis

Arts & music

Music
  • Instrumental music lessons
Performing arts
  • Dance
  • Drama
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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1015 South Snelling Ave
St. Paul, MN 55116
Phone: (651) 293-8940

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