Advertisement
Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

Armand R. Dupont School

Public | 6-8

 

Be sure to visit

Take along one of
our checklists:

 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

6 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted June 6, 2014

I attended ARD in the mid to late 90's and had a fairly miserable experience. I can recount a number of times when I was humiliated, demeaned, or punished along with other students despite being a mostly "A" student and striving to be well behaved (I hated getting into trouble). Despite my best efforts, I was frequently made to feel ashamed. Many of the staff that made me feel this way are still working there, so despite the passage of time, I feel it's worth mentioning it now. My dislike for ARD continued into high school, because I discovered at Pembroke Academy just how far ahead Pembroke, Epsom, and Chichester students were in their academics compared to me (again, I was an "A" student in Allenstown) so that lead to more feelings of "not being good enough" and it hurt my motivation. If you have the option of sending your child somewhere besides Allenstown, I highly recommend taking that route. I am still bothered as an adult by things I experienced at ARD.


Posted March 3, 2007

Last year I attended ARD, and I feel the students were not given as much opporotunity as other middle schools in surrounding areas have revceived. Our music program was a small optional chorus which met in the midst of classes which members were excused from, and responsible for making up missed work. Our foreign language program was manditory, as opposed to being chosen over another english course. Our PE was part of a 22 day long rotation along with art, computer, french, and study, so our students would only get 22 days of exercise. Other problems, such as the mobile classrooms have been said in previous reviews, but nonetheless I still feel I should re-state their existence. The staff, to me, are just fine, but the curriculm in my opinion is flawed.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted February 20, 2006

ARD is an incredible school. We many not be the richest or have the fanciest hall ways but we have something that most school's these days do not. We have the spirt and guidance to help us want to succeed. We have the ability to reach for our dreams without getting discouraged on the way. Most importantly we have a community of people who each and every day work together to make every day worth while. Any person would be lucky to go to ARD.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 7, 2005

Im a seventh grader that goes to Armand R. Dupont Middle School. I realize our school isnt the greatest. But it is good enough to give us the education we deserve. Not all the teachers are the nicest but I think a lot of us enjoy waking up every day to go to school and hang out with our friends and come to school to learn something new. Our school is not as bad as everyone thinks. We dont need fancy bathrooms or halls to get an education. We have all we need to get an education. And if we dont then we work as hard as we can to get it. Armand R. Dupont is a great School.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 24, 2005

Shame on me for not doing my 'homework' about the schools in Allenstown. I was quite shocked to learn that there is NO music instruction, some classes have NEVER been allowed to borrow books from the school library, and the 5th grade students do not eat until 1 pm. Also, the mobile classroom utilized by two of the 5th grade classes has been without heat on several occasions. There are no bathroom facilities for the students in the mobile classes (other than in the main building) , in spite of the fact that materials and labor were donated for restroom hookups.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 15, 2003

My 11 year old son has a learning disability which entitled him to an IEP. These teachers have no understanding or skills to help these kids. We have been the voice for my son for the past two years and are determined to not let these teachers fail him. My best advice to parents for this school is to make sure you know your childs rights for No Child Left Behind because you are going to need it!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 70% in 2014.

48 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
63%

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
43%

2011

 
 
54%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 77% in 2014.

48 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
73%

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
54%

2011

 
 
64%
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 New Hampshire used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing. The NECAP is a standards-based test that measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Hampshire. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: New Hampshire Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 69% in 2014.

44 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
57%

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
48%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 75% in 2014.

44 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
57%

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
65%
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 New Hampshire used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing. The NECAP is a standards-based test that measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Hampshire. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: New Hampshire Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2014.

44 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
46%

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
44%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 78% in 2014.

44 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
73%

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
81%
Science

The state average for Science was 32% in 2012.

36 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
28%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 57% in 2014.

44 students were tested at this school in 2014.

2014

 
 
43%

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
56%
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 New Hampshire used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing. The NECAP is a standards-based test that measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Hampshire. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: New Hampshire Department of Education

Math

All Students63%
Female54%
Male72%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
Multiracialn/a
White (non-Hispanic)63%
Economically disadvantaged50%
Non-economically disadvantaged69%
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disabilityn/a
Without educational disability71%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English63%
Non-migrant63%
Former LEP student - monitoring year 1n/a
Former LEP student - monitoring year 2n/a

Reading

All Students73%
Female77%
Male69%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
Multiracialn/a
White (non-Hispanic)71%
Economically disadvantaged75%
Non-economically disadvantaged72%
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disabilityn/a
Without educational disability80%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English73%
Non-migrant73%
Former LEP student - monitoring year 1n/a
Former LEP student - monitoring year 2n/a
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 New Hampshire used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing. The NECAP is a standards-based test that measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Hampshire. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the New Hampshire Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Hampshire Department of Education

Math

All Students57%
Female60%
Male52%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
Multiracialn/a
White (non-Hispanic)56%
Economically disadvantaged48%
Non-economically disadvantaged64%
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disabilityn/a
Without educational disability68%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English57%
Non-migrant57%
Former LEP student - monitoring year 2n/a

Reading

All Students57%
Female56%
Male58%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
Multiracialn/a
White (non-Hispanic)56%
Economically disadvantaged53%
Non-economically disadvantaged60%
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disabilityn/a
Without educational disability68%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English57%
Non-migrant57%
Former LEP student - monitoring year 2n/a
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 New Hampshire used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing. The NECAP is a standards-based test that measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Hampshire. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the New Hampshire Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Hampshire Department of Education

Math

All Students46%
Female54%
Male36%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
Multiracialn/a
White (non-Hispanic)47%
Economically disadvantaged33%
Non-economically disadvantaged56%
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disability7%
Without educational disability66%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English46%
Non-migrant46%

Reading

All Students73%
Female82%
Male64%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
Multiracialn/a
White (non-Hispanic)74%
Economically disadvantaged62%
Non-economically disadvantaged83%
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disability60%
Without educational disability79%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English73%
Non-migrant73%

Writing

All Students43%
Female50%
Male36%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
Multiracialn/a
White (non-Hispanic)44%
Economically disadvantaged19%
Non-economically disadvantaged65%
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disability13%
Without educational disability58%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English43%
Non-migrant43%
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 New Hampshire used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing. The NECAP is a standards-based test that measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Hampshire. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the New Hampshire Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Hampshire Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2013-2014 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 90% 89%
Hispanic 3% 4%
Two or more races 3% 2%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 2% 3%
Black 1% 2%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 51%N/A26%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

Apply

To learn more about enrolling, please call the school.
 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

10 1/2 School St
Allenstown, NH 03275
Phone: (603) 485-4474

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools

Three Rivers School
Pembroke, NH


Green Valley School
Pembroke, NH






ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT