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Seacoast Charter School

Charter | K-8 | 226 students

 

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Living in Kingston

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $176,500. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,120.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 6 ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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Parent involvement

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11 reviews of this school


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Posted Wednesday, October 22, 2014

SCS does not challenge students academically. My son was always one year ahead in math, in the fifth grade, attempts were made to hold him back for no reason. In the sixth grade, they were successful at holding him back because they did not inform the parents. For one month my son sat repeating sixth grade math despite passing it the previous year. We fought to have him take an online 7th grade math course. Why teachers would be resistant to having a student excel is still baffling. At his new school, they have advanced him to ninth grade math. Amazing how one school recognizes the academic need and one wants to stifle it. How can teachers at SCS say that they are preparing students for high school? Are they not aware that taking advanced placement courses is a significant advantage? It is not the same school that it was six years ago and the problems did not all happen in one year. It is shameful what they did to my son. It is just my opinion, but it is going to take a big shake up and many years for this school to turn around. My advice is to avoid it, if you must go then stay on top of things and do not become blinded by good mouth service and fluff.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Pulled our daughter out after 3.5 weeks here. The first red flag was the emails sent out to parents by the new head of school that were loaded with grammatical and spelling errors. Very unprofessional for a person in that position. Multiple behavior issues in my daughters class, where the whole class would have long "quiet times" where some kids would lay down/nap? on the floor(1st gr). Homework was not very organized. Teachers seemed overwhelmed. Felt the curriculum was lacking, and my daughter needed more challenging work. Security of the school needs some work, I should not be able to take my daughter from outside without one adult even glancing in my direction. Financial issues are worrisome. Perhaps the most disturbing incident is when I went in to notify them I would be unenrolling my daughter (midweek), they said she could not finish out the week there (I did say I wanted her to since she wasn't starting her other school until the following week). My daughter was upset because she couldn't say goodbye. So much for the well being of the child! Felt like we were being kicked out of the school. NO ONE asked us why we were pulling her out, apparently they just don't care why.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 5, 2014

The education program overall is very good. Students set a goal (personal learning plan) for the year, approved by their teacher and they track their progress on it each week. The school went through some changes last year that turned out negatively with a new head of school that left, and such, but, this year it is back to it's former glory and is running more smoothly then ever. Students are not held back from going above and beyond academically and gifted students are challenged appropriately. Music and art programs are outstanding. Overall great school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 2, 2014

Many teachers are not credentialed. There are some teachers who allow students to read because "they are having a bad day." What once was a good art program in upper grades has been reduced to 75% doodling. There is no opportunity for students to advance and many are held back when it is not appropriate. Many students who have left stated that they were not well prepared. A new principal may make the difference but this school has seen three principals in the past 4 years which speaks for itself.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 4, 2014

Enrolling my children at SCS was the best academic decision we have made. Bloom's Taxonomy is alive and thriving within the walls of SCS. Children are being asked to think, create, listen, teach, explore and analyze every day. They meet as a school community every Friday morning to talk about what they have learned, share music, songs and knowledge. My children have had gifted teachers who have brought out the best n them. I have witnessed five year olds working together as an ensemble and third, fourth and fifth graders taking their strings performance more seriously than many high school ensembles. What the teachers do for and with these kids is inspiring. We could not be happier.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 15, 2014

The school really changed within the past year. There was poor organization and management, staffing issues, and much of the original success of the school has been compromised. Hopefully a new administrator and higher standards (such as all teachers being certified to teach) could restore this school's success but it may take awhile. Some of the faculty are outstanding and have great credentials.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 19, 2013

Our school is changing this year. We have a new principal, a larger student body, and a new class structure. Previously, we had blended classes: 1st and 2nd, 3rd and 4th, 5th and 6th, 7th and 8th together. All my kids really enjoyed that. This year the classes will be separated, more like a 'regular' school. We shall have to see if we still like it as well.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 5, 2013

We love this school. The teachers are so dedicated to their profession and really care about the kids. Their approach to discipline is to talk things out with the students rather than the usual write up or detention that does not have a big effect. Children are in a much more relaxed environment. The arts and music programs are excellent. They need more funding from the State and Federal goverment to continue providing the excellent education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 3, 2009

When we moved back east from MN, my child was in a charter school there, so we made sure we lived close to this school becuase the methods used to teach in this school were the most beneficial to my childs learning experience. Our decision was the right one as time told. Great faculty/teachers that really care about making in impact in my childs education. I'm glad to say that my child even with her learning diability is thriving in Seacoast Charter school and loves to go to school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 28, 2009

This a a great public school alternative. They promote individuality in both academics and the arts. It's a great home for my children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 20, 2007

The school has provide an enviroment that children can thrive in. Intergrated art and music with core academics. The classes are set up so, if your child needs more help or more of a challenge it is available. Spanish is taught starting in the 1sr grade. In 3rd grade they pick the cello, violin,or viola for their music instrument. Art not only teaches the basics of drawing but introduces ancient cultures. Science is taught through projects and expreriments. Science Fairs,Music concerts, and a Shakesphere play are just some of the wonderful things going on in this school. The teachers and head of school are top notch. They have a true passion for teaching.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 70% in 2014.

2014

 
 
n/a

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
96%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 77% in 2014.

2014

 
 
n/a

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
82%
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 New Hampshire used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing. The NECAP is a standards-based test that measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Hampshire. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: New Hampshire Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 73% in 2014.

2014

 
 
n/a

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
77%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 75% in 2014.

2014

 
 
n/a

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
78%
Science

The state average for Science was 53% in 2012.

2012

 
 
n/a
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 New Hampshire used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing. The NECAP is a standards-based test that measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Hampshire. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: New Hampshire Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 73% in 2014.

2014

 
 
n/a

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
72%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 79% in 2014.

2014

 
 
n/a

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
82%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 62% in 2014.

2014

 
 
n/a

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 New Hampshire used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing. The NECAP is a standards-based test that measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Hampshire. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: New Hampshire Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 70% in 2014.

2014

 
 
n/a

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
91%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 77% in 2014.

2014

 
 
n/a

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
86%
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 New Hampshire used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing. The NECAP is a standards-based test that measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Hampshire. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: New Hampshire Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 69% in 2014.

2014

 
 
n/a

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
72%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 75% in 2014.

2014

 
 
n/a

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
80%
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 New Hampshire used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing. The NECAP is a standards-based test that measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Hampshire. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: New Hampshire Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2014.

2014

 
 
n/a

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
67%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 78% in 2014.

2014

 
 
n/a

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
94%
Science

The state average for Science was 32% in 2012.

2012

 
 
n/a
Writing

The state average for Writing was 57% in 2014.

2014

 
 
n/a

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 New Hampshire used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing. The NECAP is a standards-based test that measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Hampshire. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: New Hampshire Department of Education

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African American (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
Multiracialn/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disabilityn/a
Without educational disabilityn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrantn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African American (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
Multiracialn/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disabilityn/a
Without educational disabilityn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrantn/a
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 New Hampshire used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing. The NECAP is a standards-based test that measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Hampshire. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the New Hampshire Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Hampshire Department of Education

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African American (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disabilityn/a
Without educational disabilityn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrantn/a
Former LEP student - monitoring year 1n/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African American (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disabilityn/a
Without educational disabilityn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrantn/a
Former LEP student - monitoring year 1n/a
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 New Hampshire used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing. The NECAP is a standards-based test that measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Hampshire. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the New Hampshire Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Hampshire Department of Education

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African American (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
Multiracialn/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disabilityn/a
Without educational disabilityn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrantn/a
Former LEP student - monitoring year 2n/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African American (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
Multiracialn/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disabilityn/a
Without educational disabilityn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrantn/a
Former LEP student - monitoring year 2n/a

Writing

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African American (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
Multiracialn/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disabilityn/a
Without educational disabilityn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrantn/a
Former LEP student - monitoring year 2n/a
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 New Hampshire used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing. The NECAP is a standards-based test that measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Hampshire. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the New Hampshire Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Hampshire Department of Education

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African American (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
Multiracialn/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disabilityn/a
Without educational disabilityn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrantn/a
Former LEP student - monitoring year 1n/a
Former LEP student - monitoring year 2n/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African American (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
Multiracialn/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disabilityn/a
Without educational disabilityn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrantn/a
Former LEP student - monitoring year 1n/a
Former LEP student - monitoring year 2n/a
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 New Hampshire used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing. The NECAP is a standards-based test that measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Hampshire. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the New Hampshire Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Hampshire Department of Education

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African American (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
Multiracialn/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disabilityn/a
Without educational disabilityn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrantn/a
Former LEP student - monitoring year 2n/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African American (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
Multiracialn/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disabilityn/a
Without educational disabilityn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrantn/a
Former LEP student - monitoring year 2n/a
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 New Hampshire used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing. The NECAP is a standards-based test that measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Hampshire. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the New Hampshire Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Hampshire Department of Education

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African American (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
Multiracialn/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disabilityn/a
Without educational disabilityn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrantn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African American (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
Multiracialn/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disabilityn/a
Without educational disabilityn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrantn/a

Writing

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African American (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
Multiracialn/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disabilityn/a
Without educational disabilityn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrantn/a
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 New Hampshire used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing. The NECAP is a standards-based test that measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Hampshire. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the New Hampshire Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Hampshire Department of Education

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 98% 89%
Hispanic 1% 4%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 3%
Black 0% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Two or more races 0% 2%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 4%N/A26%
Female 49%N/A48%
Male 51%N/A52%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Music teacher(s)
Special education coordinator
Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Special education / special needs

Staff resources available to students
  • Special education coordinator

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

School facilities
  • Access to farm or natural area
  • Computer lab

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Music room
Visual arts
  • Ceramics
  • Design
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
  • Photography
  • Printmaking
  • Sculpture
Music
  • Instrumental music lessons
  • Orchestra
  • Rock band
  • Theory
Performing and written arts
  • Drama
  • Improv

Health & athletics

School facilities
  • Access to farm or natural area
  • Access to sports fields
  • Gym
  • Kitchen
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • Before school
  • After school

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • Special education coordinator
  • Teacher aid/assistant teacher
School facilities
  • Access to farm or natural area
  • Access to sports fields
  • Art room
  • Auditorium
  • Cafeteria
  • Computer lab
  • Gym
  • Internet access
  • Kitchen
  • Music room
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Ceramics
  • Design
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
  • Photography
  • Printmaking
  • Sculpture
Music
  • Instrumental music lessons
  • Orchestra
  • Rock band
  • Theory
Performing arts
  • Drama
  • Improv
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events found for this school
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School culture

Parent involvement
  • Attend parent nights
  • Chaperone school trips
  • Coach sports teams or extracurricular activities
  • Organize fundraising events (school auction, bake sales, etc.)
  • Serve on school improvement team or governance council
  • Volunteer in the classroom
  • Volunteer time after school
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Apply

To learn more about enrolling, please call the school.
 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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13 Church St
Kingston, NH 03848
Phone: (603) 642-8400

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