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Florence Rideout Elementary School

Public | PK-6 | 241 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
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2012:
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2011:
Based on 2 ratings

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6 reviews of this school


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Posted November 2, 2011

I did not like this school. The staff is fair but education is poor. I do not future generations to suffer as I had for 5 years.


Posted March 23, 2011

The teachers and staff at FRES are a dedicated and caring group of people. They work hard with limited resources and they expect only the best out of their students. I work as a consultant in this school district and I find it to be a wonderful school. I would put my children in this school if I lived in this district and not in the Hollis school district.


Posted October 7, 2009

To get an idea of where this school is headed, attend a School Board meeting. There are many changes afoot due to consolidating with Lyndeborough as of 7/1/10. Get involved and see what the future looks like for Wilton schools. Also, do your research and look at the history of standardized testing in Wilton schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 12, 2009

Whoever decided to paint the children with marker on field day is absolutely not on my list of people recccomended to take care of my child . It took over an hour to remove most not all of the marker from her face .....Not happy!!!!!!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 29, 2006

F.R.E.S. is a wonderful school. It's small and quaint, sure, but I found that it had a great learning environment. Most of the teachers were resourceful and I really did graduate with fond elementary memories. I attended Flornece Rideout from preschool to 6th grade, and being of a different background, I had help in learning English and acquainting myself with classmates. The programs (Sparklers, Chorus, open art, sports, etc.) available to the student body at the time of my attendance were decent but limited; however, they have noticeably expanded today, including a cooking club and a Legos-oriented club. Currently the school is considering renovations for a larger auditorium and possibly more building additions.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted January 11, 2005

i think that florence Ridout is a good school. I have a lot of great memories from there i had a lot of bad ones to. It was all because of the after school program.I am speaking from personal experience when i say that the people were mean and they would yell at kids for no reason. I know that the other kids didn't like them either. I hated it so much that i wanted to acually be expelled and I'm a goody goody two shoes. I am telling you this because i do not want future children to suffer like i did.
—Submitted by a former student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 70% in 2014.

2014

 
 
n/a

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
69%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 77% in 2014.

2014

 
 
n/a

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
72%
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 New Hampshire used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing. The NECAP is a standards-based test that measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Hampshire. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: New Hampshire Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 73% in 2014.

2014

 
 
n/a

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
51%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 75% in 2014.

2014

 
 
n/a

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
58%
Science

The state average for Science was 53% in 2012.

2012

 
 
n/a
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 New Hampshire used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing. The NECAP is a standards-based test that measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Hampshire. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: New Hampshire Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 73% in 2014.

2014

 
 
n/a

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
65%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 79% in 2014.

2014

 
 
n/a

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
72%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 62% in 2014.

2014

 
 
n/a

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 New Hampshire used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing. The NECAP is a standards-based test that measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Hampshire. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: New Hampshire Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 70% in 2014.

2014

 
 
n/a

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
54%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 77% in 2014.

2014

 
 
n/a

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
89%
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 New Hampshire used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing. The NECAP is a standards-based test that measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Hampshire. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: New Hampshire Department of Education

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African American (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
Multiracialn/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disabilityn/a
Without educational disabilityn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrantn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African American (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
Multiracialn/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disabilityn/a
Without educational disabilityn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrantn/a
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 New Hampshire used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing. The NECAP is a standards-based test that measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Hampshire. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the New Hampshire Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Hampshire Department of Education

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African American (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disabilityn/a
Without educational disabilityn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrantn/a
Former LEP student - monitoring year 1n/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African American (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disabilityn/a
Without educational disabilityn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrantn/a
Former LEP student - monitoring year 1n/a
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 New Hampshire used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing. The NECAP is a standards-based test that measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Hampshire. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the New Hampshire Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Hampshire Department of Education

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African American (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
Multiracialn/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disabilityn/a
Without educational disabilityn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrantn/a
Former LEP student - monitoring year 2n/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African American (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
Multiracialn/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disabilityn/a
Without educational disabilityn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrantn/a
Former LEP student - monitoring year 2n/a

Writing

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African American (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
Multiracialn/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disabilityn/a
Without educational disabilityn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrantn/a
Former LEP student - monitoring year 2n/a
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 New Hampshire used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing. The NECAP is a standards-based test that measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Hampshire. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the New Hampshire Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Hampshire Department of Education

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African American (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
Multiracialn/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disabilityn/a
Without educational disabilityn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrantn/a
Former LEP student - monitoring year 1n/a
Former LEP student - monitoring year 2n/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African American (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
Multiracialn/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Title I program (current)n/a
With educational disabilityn/a
Without educational disabilityn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrantn/a
Former LEP student - monitoring year 1n/a
Former LEP student - monitoring year 2n/a
Scale: % achievement level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2013-2014 New Hampshire used the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math, and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing. The NECAP is a standards-based test that measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Hampshire. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the New Hampshire Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Hampshire Department of Education

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 91% 89%
Hispanic 4% 4%
Two or more races 4% 2%
Black 1% 2%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 3%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 26%N/A26%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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18 Tremont St
Wilton, NH 03086
Phone: (603) 654-6714

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