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Southwest Secondary School

Public | 7-12

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Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
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2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 4 ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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10 reviews of this school


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Posted April 5, 2013

This had to be the worst school I have ever attended. The teachers don't help. The classes do not teach me much. The lectures aren't always clear. The social part is lacking severely. Keeping on track is very difficult and in order to keep up, you have to do the classes almost 24/7.


Posted August 15, 2012

Southwest Primary & Intermediate Learning Center Charter Schools are AMAZING! We can't say enough positive things about SLC! Yes, the academic workload is intense. Yes, your child will develop critical thinking skills. Yes, he/she will learn to use logic, deductive reasoning, and abstract thinking. Our goal is to raise our two boys to be functioning, law-abiding citizens with academic & professional skills by the time they graduate from high school. Following in their father's footsteps to be a pilot is the icing on the cake! Not getting enough Art or Music in your local elementary APS school? Send your child to SPLC: Art, Music, Spanish, AND Computer Science are part of the yearly curriculum. Looking for responsive administrators? SPLC & SILC have attentive principals and academic support personnel. Within two hours of receiving a letter reference a bullying incident, the principal contacted me. He provided feedback and had the issue resolved within 24 hours. Pupil Teacher Ratio (PTR) is NOT a problem at this school either. If you're looking for a quality college prep school and can't afford the private school tuition rates, this charter school is the way to go!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 10, 2012

Awesome school!!!!!! 2 boys love it- One will graduates as a college Sophomore because of dual i=enrollment at CNM. NO nonsense meat and potatoes education with some cool innovative twists
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 27, 2012

To the parent who's "A" kid had difficulty with a Health class, shame on you. To denigrate a school just because "there were trick questions" and the class you took was "too hard" is disgraceful "sour grapes" tripe. I hope you're not one of those parents who does all the work so little Johnny can get a "straight A" report card. As a test psychologist, I'm not going to get into the very good reasoning for "trick questions," as you call them (such as deductive reasoning, logic, developing critical thinking skills, etc.), but any school that is challenging children (in any subject) to think on their own, should be praised, and that's why I'm giving 5 stars to counteract your "woe is me" whining. Oh, and BTW, my kids took the health course here, and said it was one of the easiest classes in the curriculum (full-time)--and they are not "straight A" students! You know, there's a reason the test scores are among the highest in the state, AND there's a 6,000 student waiting list to get in! Let THAT determine your choices! Look it up!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 19, 2012

Just what my daughter needed! I have one child that attends high school here, another does extended learning classes. She has trouble in a traditional setting getting homework turned in--no trouble here! Classes progress at her pace. She's well ahead of where she needs to be. My other daughter took Health over Spring break and finished quickly. Extended learning program gives so many options! It's a great way to get ahead of schedule/take dual credit classes. School has really worked with us. Best summer PE program! Classes aren't easy, They do require you to demonstrate knowledge of each lesson.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 2, 2011

My son took the online health class (e2020) for high school in order to get that graduation requirement out of the way. Lectures are long and tedious, and test questions often test some minute detail that was discussed in the lecture that has little to do with learning material. The questions almost felt like they were trying to trick you rather than test if you have an understanding of the material. To make things worse, if you miss a question in the quiz or homework section, they will not tell which one you got wrong, and then they ask the same question on the tests in each section. My son managed to complete the course with hours and hours of work with an overall 97% in the class, but it really was torture. He is a straight A student who is normally able to breeze though material, but given the tedious nature of the course, there was no way to speed things up. He had planned to take NM History through SW Secondary Learning as well, but instead he switched to Hope Connection which was much less time to complete. If you are looking for a place to get easy requirements out of the way, SW Secondary is NOT the place to go.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 14, 2009

I am a student and I give it 4 out of 5 stars because the social part of the school is lacking and staying on track is VERY hard
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 9, 2009

My son graduated in 2008 and throught he dual-enrollmetn program, had already earned close to 18 college credits. He was very-well prepared for college and is getting almost all A's in college. Southwest Learning Centers. My daughter is a Sophomore and has earned 14 colege credits. She is the first female and youngest student in the flight school program. She is lerning how to fly and will earn her private pilots license when she is 17. This school does mre than prepare students for college- it prepares students for life!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 23, 2004

My daughter loves going here. It is a school where each child works at their own level. Most of the work is done on computers. There are still a few kinks to work out but it is much better than the horrible APS schools. Most of the money is spent on the administration. Charter schools are a good alternative and my daughter is thriving, happy, and staying out of trouble which is excellent for a teenager.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 5, 2004

Southwest secondary learning center is great! My son loves going and we were very fortunate to get him in. The Albuquerque public schools are generally pretty poor.(test scores show New Mexico schools one of the nations worst!) There are such long waiting lists to be accepted into the Charter schools, because they have been rating better and a lot less overcrowded. I was told my son won the lottery pick. Now my son for the first time is finally thinking about college! SW learning center has not only increased his self esteem, but he now enjoys learning!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 41% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
86%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 50% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
93%
Science

The state average for Science was 42% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
79%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
54%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
92%
Science

The state average for Science was 29% in 2010.

24 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
58%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

The state average for Math was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 56% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 40% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Science

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Science

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

The state average for Math was 38% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
75%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
86%
Science

The state average for Science was 39% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
74%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 47% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2010-2011 New Mexico used the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test students in grade 11 in Reading, Math, Science and Social Studies. As of 2012, New Mexico will use only the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in reading and math. The NMHSSA is a standards-based test, which means that it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English language learnersn/a

Science

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English language learnersn/a

Social Studies

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2010-2011 New Mexico used the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test students in grade 11 in Reading, Math, Science and Social Studies. As of 2012, New Mexico will use only the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in reading and math. The NMHSSA is a standards-based test, which means that it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Oops! We currently do not have any student information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

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10301 Candelaria NE
Albuquerque, NM 87112
Phone: (505) 880-3744

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