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GreatSchools Rating

Corrales International

Charter | K-10 | 205 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 3 ratings
2013:
Based on 19 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 10 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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34 reviews of this school


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Posted July 30, 2014

In my opinion this school is great in the sense of international learning and they are constantly trying to improve the quality of the school. Some of the good things about CIS are the small class sizes, the relationship teachers develope with students, and the involvement of parents and family members. One thing the school could work on is being on top of the behavior.


Posted July 25, 2014

We moved from a large public school to CIS. Best thing we could have done. Great teachers and administration....could not ask for more.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 21, 2014

I really thought this school was going to be amazing. We did all the fundraisers and tried our best to get this school going. We fought the Corrales village and there opposition to the school. But I think they saw things we didn't see. They ousted the principal in the first few months. Half the teachers left one year. And bullying was rampant. And they wouldn't do anything about it. I am grateful that my child is done with this school. I hope it hasn't caused to much hardships for my child. They said my child's test scores were great and everything was just perfect all the time. An independent test showed otherwise. Now I'm going to have to seek out after school tutoring to get my child caught up. I would highly recommend seeking out another bilingual school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 14, 2013

After reading all of the comments (It appears some of the comments are made up just to keep star rating up) I still thought this school would be a good fit. After trying to work with administration, I had to pull my child out. No organization, students are not learning at the pace I was told and bulling is ignored. I don't understand why APS is not investigating the goings on at this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2013

For those parents who want answers you will be very frustrated trying to get to the bottom of why the headmaster refuses to answer any direct questions regarding her teachers. The math and science teachers in the middle school are lacking and the kids are actually getting behind. Our kids were tested in their new schools this year and are 2 years behind after being at this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 10, 2013

!que escuela tan maravillosa! Nos encantan todo en esa pequena escuela. We are grateful to have our fabulous little school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 5, 2013

Open communication, small classrooms, motivated teachers, and a well rounded education make Corrales International one of the best charter schools in Albuquerque. A great community of teachers, staff, parents, and students!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 3, 2013

My daughter just started at Corrales and so far the entire experience has been wonderful! She loves it there, she was instantly accepted by the students who had been there for years, so no annoying cliques or ostracize the new kid attitude that can so often happen at charter schools. All the parents and school staff have been really welcoming and supportive. All in all, we feel very welcomed and included in the school. And the curriculum seems very good, I love that the kids have such a large focus on Spanish.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 1, 2013

We are amazed by this fantastic little school. The teachers do an outstanding job not just with the basics, but ininstilling the IB concepts that expand our children's thinking. Children at CIS are learning personal responsibility, respect for others and our planet. They get hands on experience in the garden, caring for animals and preparing food. The added bonus is learning to read, write and speak Spanish. We love this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 1, 2013

We are lucky to get into this school. My child has flourished under teachers of the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 31, 2013

We are new to CIS and have a child in the elem and one in the middle school and we have been so impressed with quality of education and the positive, nurturing atmosphere there. The open house event was fantastic, with the principal and all teachers presenting. We are excited to be a part of this community!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 31, 2013

The primary years program is awesome. Our children are learning way above the local public schools. The spanish program is wonderful and our children are lucky to be in this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 31, 2013

This is by far the best school in the city, great staff, great teachers and great students. The program is well thought out and rigorous, every effort is made to make the school a fun and effective learning environment. Cannot say enough about the great teachers at this school!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 11, 2013

I have students in the elementary grades and absolutely love each of the teachers they have had. My children are more than a nameless face in a crowded hall at CIS, they are valued and known by the caring and dedicated staff and teachers. The curriculum is challenging and my children are becoming proficient in Spanish, while being encouraged to practice empathy and display their curiosity. The head administrator is open and accessible, and I am amazed at the quality and breadth of experience our new MYP(middle school) teachers possess. No school is perfect, and no workplace without politics, but it is truly inspiring to see the level of hard work and dedication from the teachers that choose to work at CIS. It is important that my children be responsible citizens of the world, and I feel that the IB education provided by this school will help them on the road to becoming just that.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 25, 2013

The teachers that left CIS because of bad leadership are MYP, PYP, music, and special education. The assistant principal also resigned and is not being replaced. They were not "Unhappy people" as one parent put it. They were very good educators that were tired of getting intimidated and pushed around by the unfair policies. These educators were very dedicated to CIS and without them, the school is going to be in ruins. The head of school thinks she can run a school by herself, she is going to run it straight into the ground. The students, parents, and teachers of CIS were what gave CIS it's good reputation and not the head of school. She was not a coach and did not attend most of the games, like the assistant principal and a lot of the MYP teachers. These teachers deserve some respect for standing up for our school and our students. They were just trying to make the school better for the students and the working conditions better. Did you know that the MYP classrooms are tiny and all MYP teachers had to share rooms with other teachers with no quiet space of their own to work in. There were even some classes that did not have a classroom. Our kids deserve better!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 20, 2013

We are very concerned with the school and will continue our efforts to find an alternative IB school with openings. Our child (7th grade) had terrible experiences with classroom management with many of the remaining teachers. Those that he had great expereinces with have left- which speaks volumes. Our time spent with the administration has not been impressive and our son's test scores have plateaued. We are really second guessing our choice to attend CIS and suggest other MYP parents do the same.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 16, 2013

I have been very impressed with the quality of teachers, leadership and parent involvement in my family's three years at CIS. The administration is not afraid to make tough decisions that are in the best interest of the student body. The bilingual education my kids are getting is incredible. Parents are asked to participate at a higher level than I anticipated but I see that as a positive. I highly recommend this school to any family interested in providing their children with stellar educational opportunities.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 9, 2013

We are very pleased with our children's bilingual education at CIS but I think the principal is getting a bum rap. The primary (elementary) grades have performed very well on statewide tests and those teachers are International Baccalaureate (IB)-trained. Middle school performance has been less impressive and four middle school teachers will not be returning. (They have been replaced; the new teachers have IB training and experience. I asked, and there are no current teacher vacancies. The vice principal who was responsible for overseeing them, has also left and is not being replaced. I never understood why our small school really needed one, anyway.) Under the current principal s tenure, past problems with record-keeping and contracting (serious problems that led to troubling annual audit reports and even scrutiny by the state) were remedied. Rumors of an "atmosphere of mistrust" under the current principal are never accompanied by specific examples or evidence. Audits and test scores are public record, and paint a much different picture than do the rumors echoed by some here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 9, 2013

This school was once amazing, but the current administration created a climate of distrust. Over a dozen teachers (most of the 4th-10 grades educators) left the school this year. As a result, many students are leaving as well. I would strongly discourage future families from considering CIS until the current principal leaves.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 9, 2013

We have been very satisfied with the education our child has received at CIS. While we have had a few difficulties with the Vice Principal--a charismatic but inattentive individual--over the years, we have found the Principal to have an open door and to be very solutions oriented. I personally hope the unhappy people who are leaving will find happiness out in the world. I also truly believe that the opportunity to change the culture in the middle school that their departure created will result in good things down the road. I find it disheartening that some departing teachers have used their connections with some parents to create a sense of insecurity and anxiety about the school. (See some unfortunate and highly inaccurate statements in posts below). Before our current Principal joined CIS, the school was in serious financial distress and had made no progress toward IB authorization. Her leadership turned both of those things around. She may not be as friendly as the Vice Principal, but she listens and rolls up her sleeves and gets to the work of problem solving and making CIS a fantastic school, all the while inviting parents to be a part of the process!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 51% in 2013.

21 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 55% in 2013.

21 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
100%
Science

The state average for Science was 83% in 2010.

18 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

The state average for Math was 45% in 2013.

23 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

23 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 53% in 2013.

22 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

The state average for Math was 43% in 2013.

23 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
59%

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 51% in 2013.

23 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 52% in 2010.

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

The state average for Math was 40% in 2013.

24 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
22%

2011

 
 
35%

2010

 
 
53%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 47% in 2013.

24 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
53%
Science

The state average for Science was 30% in 2010.

15 students were tested at this school in 2010.

2010

 
 
60%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

The state average for Math was 41% in 2013.

22 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
35%

2010

 
 
56%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 50% in 2013.

22 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
75%
Science

The state average for Science was 42% in 2013.

22 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
44%

2010

 
 
69%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2013.

21 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
36%

2011

 
 
45%

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

21 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 29% in 2010.

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

The state average for Math was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Students95%
Female91%
Male100%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
White90%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Reading

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Students65%
Femalen/a
Male79%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic64%
Native Americann/a
White73%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Reading

All Students61%
Femalen/a
Male57%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic55%
Native Americann/a
White73%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Science

All Students77%
Femalen/a
Male86%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic80%
Native Americann/a
White82%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Students61%
Female61%
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic50%
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Reading

All Students83%
Female89%
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic75%
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Students71%
Female82%
Male62%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic64%
Native Americann/a
White82%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Reading

All Students79%
Female82%
Male77%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic73%
Native Americann/a
White91%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Students59%
Femalen/a
Male60%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic64%
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Reading

All Students64%
Femalen/a
Male67%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic64%
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Science

All Students68%
Femalen/a
Male80%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic64%
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Students71%
Female72%
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
White60%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Reading

All Students95%
Female100%
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 48% 26%
Hispanic 46% 59%
Black 4% 2%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 10%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Two or more races 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 0%N/A68%
Female 53%N/A49%
Male 47%N/A51%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

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3821 Singer Blvd NW
Albuquerque, NM 87109
Website: Click here
Phone: (505) 880-3744

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