Advertisement
Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

Cottonwood Classical Prep

Charter | 7-12

 

Be sure to visit

Take along one of
our checklists:

 

Living in Albuquerque

Situated in an urban neighborhood. The median home value is $192,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $680.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 3 ratings
2013:
Based on 8 ratings
2012:
Based on 5 ratings
2011:
Based on 19 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

40 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted February 9, 2014

This school started out as a wonderful place for life long learning 5 years ago. It soon became the norm to have 3 or 4 teachers that my child had leave during the school year. The school when from having a wonderful headmaster to a terrible principle to another principle who is out to make a name for himself the school is merely a launching pad. He cares very little for the students. The school has a lot of bulling and admin is aware of it but instead of dealing with the students involved the entire school gets reeducated on bulling which does nothing. Not a good school any longer.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 24, 2014

I'm highly dissatisfied with this school. Let's start at the beginning. My daughter - 6th grade enrolled here. My son - 11th grade enrolled here (IB student) For my son, the 11th grader, school is okay. His IB Classes are highly challenging, making AP classes look like a cake walk! He has watched many of his friends transfer out of this school because of the academic rigor (which is no joke), but my son is very intelligent and despite the extremely challenging classes manages to maintain a B average. He has stated, although the students here are definitely click-ish, he said they are mature and very focused on academics. My daughter on the other hand is miserable here. Being a 6th grader is very challenging here for her. My biggest complaint is the teaching staff, which I would hardly call "teachers," as they haven't earned that title! They are impossible to communicate with, won't respond to letters, emails, or voice mails! They are simply "too busy,"... oh please! The academics are very challenging even in the middle school grades. I'm running out of room so I will just say that don't be surprised if your child is as miserable as mine if you select this school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 24, 2014

I'm highly dissatisfied with this school. Let's start at the beginning. My daughter - 6th grade enrolled here. My son - 11th grade enrolled here (IB student) For my son, the 11th grader, school is okay. His IB Classes are highly challenging, making AP classes look like a cake walk! He has watched many of his friends transfer out of this school because of the academic rigor (which is no joke), but my son is very intelligent and despite the extremely challenging classes manages to maintain a B average. He has stated, although the students here are definitely click-ish, he said they are mature and very focused on academics. My daughter on the other hand is miserable here. Being a 6th grader is very challenging here for her. My biggest complaint is the teaching staff, which I would hardly call "teachers," as they haven't earned that title! They are impossible to communicate with, won't respond to letters, emails, or voice mails! They are simply "too busy,"... oh please! The academics are very challenging even in the middle school grades. I'm running out of room so I will just say that don't be surprised if your child is as miserable as mine if you select this school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 4, 2013

We are in our second year at this school and agree with the following: It is an elitist atmosphere, not all children (nor families) are treated equally, some teachers are great - others brag about their high failure rates, there is very little diversity and it is blatantly obvious. Even though it's a free charter, money is constantly required for projects, books, uniforms, etc. leading to lower class families and minorities not being able to stay at the school. Teachers do not talk with parents (there are no parent conferences because "teachers don't have time"). The only way to communicate is through e-mail and most often teachers do not respond. Overall, we think this school believes they are doing a better job than they are. On the fence about staying. Class sizes have increased as well.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2013

Finally, Albuquerque has a true IB prep school that is focused on helping kids find their way in the world, to give back with community service and to become open minded caring individuals. Our boys have experienced bullies at their previous schools, now they feel comfortable and safe in this environment of learning, no bullying or disruptive behaviors so that the teachers can actually spend time teaching and not being constantly distracted.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 18, 2013

The road to "success" at this school is paved by exclusion of diversity and over exploitation of staff.


Posted August 5, 2013

A lot here to offer the motivated student but CCPS continues to struggle in some areas. Our student completed the IB program, a grueling but comprehensive prep for college. Overall it was a positive experience for our family but we feel lucky. Unfortunately not all diploma candidates went into this spring's exams adequately prepared to pass. Most teachers were wonderful, but we experienced wildly fluctuating administrations/philosophies and extreme teacher turnover. During the critical 2 yr IB (11th-12th grade) program, our student started over with 4 new teachers out of 6 classes. Many teachers left the 1st 2 yrs too, sometimes mid-semester. Now that CCPS has moved to the new campus, hopefully the focus will move from fundraising back to academics. If your student is considering IB, I encourage you to first talk to as many former IB students/parents as you can so you'll know what to expect--it's absolutely not for everyone. I agree that the the social climate at CCPS can be quite insular--unfriendly to some parents and suffocating for students. A peculiar level of attention to things like the draconian dress code was frustrating with more important issues falling by the wayside.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 24, 2013

While I agree with others that have stated this school is difficult to get involved in as a parent and somewhat clicky with the adults, my son's educational experience overshadows this. He has gotten into trouble in previous years at his elementary school with other students and admin. Here he is excited about learning and is taught that he is responsible for his own education. I appreciate the way that the teachers do not belittle the children but treat them as young adults, which they are. I am very very happy about the education he receives. I do have to say I am disappointed by feeling a lack of community and trying to get involved and feeling like I can't be. Thus the reason for a 9 instead of 10.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 21, 2013

CCPS offers a very good liberal arts curriculum. If you want anything more than that (computer applications, technology, well-equipped labs, etc.), this is not the place. If your child is an over-achiever or your family can afford to donate mega $, she ll be treated like royalty. If not, she ll still have access to a good education but as a second-class citizen. Teachers are well-qualified. Most are wonderful, but some are clueless when it comes to relating to adolescents. The school seems to be losing sight of its mission and becoming extremely institutionalized. Instead of encouraging children to be individuals, they are forcing them to fit into a very restrictive mold. Students are encouraged (and even threatened) to snitch on their peers, over the smallest infraction. While this may aid the administration in keeping the upper hand, it fosters deep resentments among the students. The administration consists of bullies who have no respect for the students as people (unless they fit the mold). The teacher turnover rate has been alarming. As I said, most are wonderful, but I think they get fed up with the small-minded, elitist, control freaks in the administration.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 28, 2013

My girls are finishing their second year. Classes are small, teachers care and are engaged. Unlike other schools my children have been in, class time is not wasted on disciplining other children. The girls seem to be challenged but not stressed or overwhelmed.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 22, 2013

Our family homeschooled our children before sending our children to Cottonwood. their commitment to academic rigor is top notch! The popularity and name recognition of the school grows daily and I am proud to tell my friends and neighbors my children are educated at CCPS!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 26, 2012

The people running Cottonwood are elitest, uncompromising and rigid who do not want anybody at their school who might not be the ubiquitious shiny pennie. News for Cottonwood Staff: people like Abraham Lincoln, Albert Einstein, Winston Churchhill and Thomas Edison would all have been rejected by this school if they had been judged by their early endeavors. But, if you think education should be oppressive, grueling, boring and ordinary, this is the school for you and your kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 20, 2012

It is an amazing school where everyone gets a great education. The school has a wonderful IB program, although it is rigorous, it will truly be of help. The school is close and in the beginning I knew everyone in the whole school but since the school is quickly growing in students you only get to know your own grade. If your child is problematic and drama occurs much you might what to stay away due to the fact everyone is too close-knit to ignore each other. Classes are good and small but sometimes the schedules have problems at the beginning of the year but soon they will fix it. Throughout the years the school has been growing and the IB begins in 11th grade (All other grades are in preparation for IB). This year has been our first Homecoming and we're looking forward to the school's new campus and newest additions. Though many people have complained about our school- the school is continuously growing and learning how to be a great charter school. Our school is one of the top schools SAT's etc etc etc.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 31, 2012

This is our first year at CCPS. We are wonderfully pleased with most everything. A sum-what minor thing we have some difficulty with is that they are not very welcoming & although they try to be a community they don't quite pull it off. Somewhat cliquish amongst the adults. If they do not know you they are not very out going & treat you very hmm stern I guess. Want to immediately see your ID & will not allow any body beyond the desk. I understand safety for children but come on there is a happy & safe balance. Maybe we were spoiled at our old school where there were almost 200 students but yet the staff knew who you were, often by name, & families knew each other. This also made volunteering so much easier. Other than that we are very happy.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 26, 2012

This school is very unethical. I won't be enrolling my daugher again next year. Most teachers are great! PE teacher is cruel. We are happy with the friends she has made this year but we will be seeking a school without nepotism.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 7, 2012

I really couldn't be happier. My kids have GREAT friends, the classrooms are small, academics great and the bar goes up every year. I really feel confident my children will be ready for college after CCPS. That is what it is really all about.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 9, 2011

This has to be my favorite school of all time: The classes are small, at about 14 to 20 students in each, so that after one month, you know almost everyone in the school, teachers and students. The classes can be quite difficult, but that's what makes them fun for us, and of course, anyone is willing to help you with as much as much as they can. I love that there is no cafeteria, because we get to sit outside and eat on the unique and beautiful campus, which is right next to the bosque (we go inside during bad weather though). Our classes are just awesome, with great teachers that can teach according to everyone's needs and accommodate anyone that may have fallen behind, or challenge the most advanced students in a way that keeps them learning, no matter their level. The students are respectable and kind, and you would never see someone discriminating against another person for any reason. If someone is being inappropriate or discriminate to another, a warning is given, and with another offence, depending on the severity, they are usually taken from the school and asked not to return. Our principal situation has been shaky over the years, but we are currently at a great one.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 21, 2011

Our family is very, very happy with CCPS! Our son is in his third year there, and is learning and growing in his analytical thinking skills, writing abilities, and knowledge base by leaps and bounds. We are so pleased, too, with the fact that the school is a welcoming place for students who might be a bit different from the 'norm,' or who have differences in behavior or learning abilities. Diversity is appreciated and celebrated, and that is something we value tremendously. The school's new director is outstanding, and we couldn't be happier with the job he's doing thus far! Excellent hiring decision!! Overall, a wonderful school, and a wonderful experience for our family.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 18, 2011

My son is in his fourth year at Cottonwood Classical Preparatory School and we couldn't be more happy on all levels. Our son always struggled with focus, being still, and being respectful of the teacher's efforts. In the last three years at the school, he has found his voice, confidence, and now respects the role of the teachers and adults at the school. He went from being sent to the principal's office every year of elementary school to being 8th grade class president and getting good grades. We thank those who dedicate so much to the students of CCPS and look forward to our future with them.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 23, 2011

My child will be in 7th grade after completing 6th grade at CCPS. He has never struggled until this year. He realized he had to focus on his work, pay attention to detail and spend the time to complete projects to the best of his ability. This school does not accept mediocre attempts which I love! Yes, there are bumps, but the potential of this school is there and I'm willing to put the work into the school to make it the very best school for my son.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 41% in 2013.

122 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 50% in 2013.

122 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 42% in 2013.

122 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2013.

122 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

122 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 29% in 2010.

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

The state average for Math was 30% in 2013.

45 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
83%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

45 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
87%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2013.

22 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
72%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 56% in 2013.

22 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
80%
Science

The state average for Science was 40% in 2013.

22 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Students74%
Female73%
Male75%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic62%
Native Americann/a
White88%
Economically disadvantaged61%
Students with disabilities20%
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Reading

All Students82%
Female81%
Male83%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic76%
Native Americann/a
White93%
Economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilities50%
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Science

All Students79%
Female75%
Male83%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic70%
Native Americann/a
White90%
Economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilities60%
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Students85%
Female82%
Male87%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic83%
Native Americann/a
White85%
Economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Reading

All Students90%
Female93%
Male88%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic91%
Native Americann/a
White92%
Economically disadvantaged86%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Students73%
Female70%
Male80%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic65%
Native Americann/a
White83%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Reading

All Students71%
Female80%
Male53%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic60%
Native Americann/a
White83%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Students95%
Female92%
Male100%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Reading

All Students96%
Female92%
Male100%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Science

All Students91%
Female83%
Male100%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

The state average for Math was 38% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 39% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 47% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2010-2011 New Mexico used the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test students in grade 11 in Reading, Math, Science and Social Studies. As of 2012, New Mexico will use only the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in reading and math. The NMHSSA is a standards-based test, which means that it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a

Science

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a

Social Studies

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2010-2011 New Mexico used the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test students in grade 11 in Reading, Math, Science and Social Studies. As of 2012, New Mexico will use only the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in reading and math. The NMHSSA is a standards-based test, which means that it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 64% 26%
Hispanic 28% 59%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 4% 1%
Black 3% 2%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 10%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Two or more races 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 4%N/A68%
Female 52%N/A49%
Male 48%N/A51%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • College preparatory

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events found for this school
Searching for school events...
Date
Title
  • {{date}}
    {{title}}
Export calendar
Outlook.com
Microsoft Outlook
iCal Format
Google Calendar
Print Calendar
Uploading, please wait...
POWERED BY
Tandem

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Apply now
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

7801 Jefferson Street NE
Albuquerque, NM 87109
Website: Click here
Phone: (505) 998-1021

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools


Bosque School
Albuquerque, NM


Taft Middle School
Albuquerque, NM


Garfield Middle School
Albuquerque, NM




ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT