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Cottonwood Classical Prep

Charter | 7-12

 

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Living in Albuquerque

Situated in an urban neighborhood. The median home value is $192,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $680.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 3 ratings
2013:
Based on 8 ratings
2012:
Based on 5 ratings
2011:
Based on 19 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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40 reviews of this school


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Posted May 26, 2011

This has been our first year at the school. Very challenging for our children but they have risen to the occasion. The vision of the school is amazing and they way the students learn is even more amazing; padeia, IB, Socratic discussion. Really making the children think and use their verbal skills. The school is very new and predictably has had some changes and growing pains but my children are happy and I am happy and we plan on continuing at the school. Worth looking into.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 19, 2011

We have been at the school since the beginning. First year my student struggled (having been APS trained), second year was a turning point, and now this year he is rising to the top. I am so incredibly proud of him, and honestly feel we made the best decision. I am undoubtedly certain he will be ready for college, and will be very successful. The school has been through some bumps, is currently going through some bumps. However there is a very strong group of amazing teachers, students, and parents that are the backbone of this school and will pull through.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 11, 2011

We have been at the school since the beginning. Despite the chaos, we've stayed because of the other children and parents. The academics are good and in the third year, better than they have been. Teachers are better than ever. But we must face the reality of leaving the school because the math and science in the HS will not be what we need to get our child into a top college of choice. The IB program isn't yet up to par. I wish we could stay, but like many other families, we will have to leave and finish the HS years somewhere else. We aren't leaving because of the academic "rigor." It isn't an incredibly challenging school at all. We just wish there was more attention paid to really challenging math and science classes. We also wish the school were more welcoming to parents in ways other than having them come and do work at the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 7, 2011

This school is wonderful and first rate. The new Executive Director is fantastic and in really improving the school and getting rid of any chaos that remained from our old Executive Director. The academic schedule is rigorous and difficult, and is a real challenge. I highly encourage anyone thinking about entering the lottery next year, or any teachers thinking about working for CCPS to do so.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 31, 2011

We have been here since the beginning. We have been very happy with the school, with the rigor of the curriculum, the dedication of the faculty, and the current leadership. It has been through its growing pain, and things have not always been easy, with changes, chaos, and a divided faculty... Leadership change has not been smooth, but I truly believe that we are moving into a more stable, better phase of growth, and look forward to this school finally making the map! The fact that several faculty members left this year was a necessary step toward a more positive and unified front. Many wonderful, dedicated and experienced faculty members remain, and they are to be applauded for being there for their students, not leaving for their own selfishness. I agree that this school is selective in its student population, and is catering to the subgroup of students who have a curious mind and love to learn. Not every school fits every child, and this is not any different. This has been an amazing learning environment for my kids, as well as a nurturing place for them.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 30, 2011

Response to 2/8 parent review. 3 different leaders: Only 3rd year, so personnel flux inevitable. Students from 120 to 240 to 380. Faculty from 8 to19 to >30. CCPS evolving and many LOVE being part of the evolution. Paideia, IB, college prep school turning out real thinkers. 3 teachers resigned: School of choice=faculty take stock of charter and decide whether good fit for long haul. Instructors leave: 5 of first 8 instructors still at CCPS. Great teachers predictably come and go. Academic focus changed: Stylistic differences among faculty account for shifts between didactic, project-based and Socratic instruction. Paideia system allows for this. Teachers ARE using project-based instruction. Greek, Latin & art: 2 Greek teachers, 1 left. 4 sections of Latin; IB Latin new next year. All 6, 7, 8 grades have art; also a thriving IB art class. No upper classes: 30 6th graders needed higher math, so 2 new sections of 7th grade math on 6th grade campus. Watered down: 15-to-1 teacher/student ratio assures each student is known and served. Program is for students who are college bound and want rigor. Overflowing wait list. CCPS a gift to public ed. My kid mid-range and THRIVING.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 27, 2011

I love this school and am looking forward to joining the IB program. I like that the students at CCPS get individual attention from the teachers, something that would never be experienced in a public school. Also, we are very close to many teachers. It's great that we know that the teachers actually care about our succeeding in school, and later on, in life. I have to say that some of the teachers are really, REALLY awesome, and others are just average, but I like all of them. I get annoyed, as well as, sad, though, like the majority of my fellow classmates, that teachers leave in the middle of the quarter, semester, etc. We are not given a chance to say good bye or at least get a reason for their departure. The students here come back to school Monday and are told that the teacher will no longer be here. I hope this will change, but overall, I believe that I am receiving the best quality of education that a public school here can offer.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 21, 2011

I am very happy that my children have gotten into this wonderful school. The project based curriculum really works great. My kids don't notice how much they are learning. The administration focuses on maintaining an excellent education for our children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 7, 2011

There are loads of charter schools to choose from in and around Albuquerque and I am glad we chose CCPS. It may not be for everyone but it is perfect for us!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 2, 2011

My kids have been at the school from the beginning. A small community, the kids are so close it is wonderful to see. Yes It has its growing pains, as any new school will. BUT The class size isn't 30, and this is the closest you will get to a private education from a public school. My kids love this school. They wouldn't want to go any place else.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 2, 2011

For their third year in existence, I am quite impressed. If something is not working, they fix it. That does mean changes to classes, but what is worse would be sticking with something that isn't working. The school has doubled in size for the last three years, meaning double the staff every year. Teaching, and especially teaching IB and Paideia is not for everyone. Also a college prep school, it is a rigorous program and not for everyone, that is the beauty of charter schools! You find what fits your child. My kids LOVE this school. It is a wonderful community, and we feel very fortunate to have been chosen in the lottery.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 27, 2011

I'm a high school student here. I'm really happy that I chose to go here because of the IB program. I know that college will be easy (and easy to get into) after going through such an academically rigorous program. IB is similar to AP in that you get lots of credit for college, but the learning process is different--IB focuses on developing critical thinking habits and global perspectives. All of the teachers are extremely knowledgable about their subject and really love teaching, and are very invested in the students' progress. The administration has been a bit shaky, with a few different principals and lots of schedule changes, but growing pains are expected in any new school. There aren't a lot of students, but most get along well and there are very few outsiders. It's not dorky to be smart; it's normal to see people working on homework at lunch together or reading a novel in between classes. Overall, this school is great.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 8, 2011

The school has had three different leaders in 5 months- and the current principal makes erratic decisions. Three teachers have resigned in one month, and it seems that most of the experienced instructors will be leaving at the end of the year. The academic focus has changed from hand-on projects based learning to long lectures with note taking. They used to offer Greek and Latin, & art and the ability to take upper classes, but now it is a watered down program. Very sad, we will move our daughter to another school. In 6th grade they changed her schedule more than five times in one semester : (
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 18, 2011

IB College Prep schools typically are academically rigorous; this school is no exception. There's no basketball team, or football team. No cheerleaders. Electronic communication is the primary mode of information sharing with parents. The school has huge potential. A great vision for the future: quality of a private school education in a public school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 15, 2011

I have high hopes for this school. They have a great vision, but are struggling to reach their goals. My son is a 6th grader, and he loves it -- he's very happy is doing well. The teachers he's had have been great, and most are very responsive. My biggest concern is the "growing pains" they're experiencing. They expanded their 6th grade class and have had to adjust schedules and programs several times to meet the needs of kids and teachers. Communication about these changes has been somewhat delayed (I hear more from my son than from administration about changes and cancellations of programs) which makes it difficult know what's going on. Many emails and phone calls go unanswered. Frustrating, but we're hanging in there because we see the potential, he's doing great, and he's happy.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 20, 2010

This school has great potential...that is just not being met. The administration doesn't seem to be communicating with each other, much less with the parents. There is a HUGE turnover in staff, it is so bad the teachers don't even wait to leave at the end of the year, they leave in the middle of the semester. My son has had two PE teachers, two science teachers, and three math teachers this year alone. If your child excels in school, they will do well here, if your child is average, or has any learning disabilities at all they will be overlooked, ignored, and even bullied, by the teachers and administrators! Their intention is to be elite and to weed our all the underachievers, and with the amount of students leaving at the end of this year, it appears they have succeeded.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 15, 2010

CCPS is a great school with small class size and awesome teacher who care about their students and quality education. It has also recently qualified for International Baclaureate Eduacation for 11th and 12th grades.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2010

This school would be a better school if the staff could learn how to relate to the parents with out an elitist attitude. The teachers have issues with relateing to real life and are more interested in their agenda than educating the students. This school has great potential but will need to know about how students, no matter how smart, or unique, relate at the different age levels. ie high school students are just that not yet college and this school should recognize college is a goal not a place the children are in now.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 15, 2010

My son is in his second year at CCPS and we love it. This school keeps him challenged yet impowers him to be involved in the quality of his education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 15, 2010

My son is in his second year at CCPS and we love it. It challenges him and has helped him become a more involved learner when it comes to his eduction.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 41% in 2013.

122 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 50% in 2013.

122 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 42% in 2013.

122 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2013.

122 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

122 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 29% in 2010.

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

The state average for Math was 30% in 2013.

45 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
83%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

45 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
87%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2013.

22 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
72%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 56% in 2013.

22 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
80%
Science

The state average for Science was 40% in 2013.

22 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Students74%
Female73%
Male75%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic62%
Native Americann/a
White88%
Economically disadvantaged61%
Students with disabilities20%
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Reading

All Students82%
Female81%
Male83%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic76%
Native Americann/a
White93%
Economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilities50%
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Science

All Students79%
Female75%
Male83%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic70%
Native Americann/a
White90%
Economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilities60%
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Students85%
Female82%
Male87%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic83%
Native Americann/a
White85%
Economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Reading

All Students90%
Female93%
Male88%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic91%
Native Americann/a
White92%
Economically disadvantaged86%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Students73%
Female70%
Male80%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic65%
Native Americann/a
White83%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Reading

All Students71%
Female80%
Male53%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic60%
Native Americann/a
White83%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Students95%
Female92%
Male100%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Reading

All Students96%
Female92%
Male100%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Science

All Students91%
Female83%
Male100%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

The state average for Math was 38% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 39% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 47% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2010-2011 New Mexico used the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test students in grade 11 in Reading, Math, Science and Social Studies. As of 2012, New Mexico will use only the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in reading and math. The NMHSSA is a standards-based test, which means that it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a

Science

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a

Social Studies

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2010-2011 New Mexico used the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test students in grade 11 in Reading, Math, Science and Social Studies. As of 2012, New Mexico will use only the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in reading and math. The NMHSSA is a standards-based test, which means that it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 64% 26%
Hispanic 28% 59%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 4% 1%
Black 3% 2%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 10%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Two or more races 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 4%N/A68%
Female 52%N/A49%
Male 48%N/A51%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

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What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

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  • College preparatory

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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7801 Jefferson Street NE
Albuquerque, NM 87109
Website: Click here
Phone: (505) 998-1021

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