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GreatSchools Rating

International School At Mesa Del Sol

Charter | K-6

 
 

Living in Albuquerque

Situated in an urban neighborhood. The median home value is $195,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $600.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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4 reviews of this school


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Posted Monday, July 21, 2014

The worst school I have ever worked for! The leadership was terrible until March when three new administrators were hired. But by then the damage was already done. Nine staff members left in the course of the year because of little teacher support from the administration and zero consequences given to students for their behavior. The middle school is in a terrible position with zero resources. They should have never opened the middle school portion especially since the elementary side doesn't even have a solid reading program in place. When I was there, I had to buy anything I wanted to use in my classroom out of my own pocket. Yes, that usually comes with any teaching position, but do teachers ever have to buy curriculum for students to learn? Only at this school have I encountered this! Many other charter schools are able to run their schools efficiently and well with the money they receive from the state and sales of things like t-shirts, polo shirts, school merchandise, etc. When you are constantly being told by administration that there is no money, one has to wonder where it all goes. I would not recommend this school to any parent or teacher!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted January 8, 2014

While I do agree with the buildings being portable and the parking not organized I believe my child is getting a great education. I love the teaching methods and I know first hand that this school's curriculum is head and shoulders above regular APS schools. The Head of School Dr. Sean Joyce is an amazing leader he just doesn't have the funds or people to market as he could. The lunch this year is horrible for the price but you can pack your child's lunch. There is always a trade off for things and I'm grateful to have found this school. We drive 60 miles a day for this private school education. Good and bad with everything just see past the outside and have a tour and talk to some of the kids. You will be amazed. My daughter only has 13 kids in her kinder class. unheard of anywhere else. Other schools usually have an unqualified "EA" Just as a warm body to manage and babysit the kids. I love this school. We are hoping to be in a permanent building by 2015 per the charter.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 18, 2013

My daughter has been attending TISNM for 3 years now, and the quality of the experience has seriously deteriorated over that time. While we love the IB program and the teachers are okay, the school is run in a haphazard, incompetent manner. The school has been on a "temporary" site built solely of run-down portable buildings for 5 years. They don't aggressively market the school to the community. The nutritional value of the lunches is down to public-school quality. And the parking/pickup situation is criminally unsafe this year; I'm surprised no one has been hit or killed. The board and principal have managed to squander a great opportunity.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 15, 2013

The international school at mesa del sol is a great school! My children arechallenged every day and are taught to think for themselves. The class sizes are small with 20 students per class. The teachers are professional and care about their students. The administration puts the kids first and is developing a first-rate education alternative.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 51% in 2013.

57 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 55% in 2013.

57 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 83% in 2010.

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

The state average for Math was 45% in 2013.

35 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
37%

2012

 
 
60%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

35 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 53% in 2013.

35 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

The state average for Math was 43% in 2013.

20 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 51% in 2013.

20 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
60%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 52% in 2010.

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

The state average for Math was 40% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
35%

2012

 
 
44%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 47% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 30% in 2010.

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Students33%
Female40%
Male30%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic24%
Native Americann/a
White36%
Economically disadvantaged33%
Students with disabilities0%
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Reading

All Students47%
Female75%
Male32%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic24%
Native Americann/a
White55%
Economically disadvantaged37%
Students with disabilities10%
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Students37%
Female35%
Male39%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic37%
Native Americann/a
White36%
Economically disadvantaged29%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Reading

All Students46%
Female47%
Male44%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic37%
Native Americann/a
White55%
Economically disadvantaged29%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Science

All Students60%
Female65%
Male56%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic50%
Native Americann/a
White82%
Economically disadvantaged41%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Students65%
Female57%
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Reading

All Students80%
Female79%
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Students35%
Female50%
Male24%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic26%
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged12%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Current18%
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Reading

All Students59%
Female75%
Male47%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic53%
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged41%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Current55%
English Language Learner Exitedn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 41% 59%
White 38% 26%
Black 11% 2%
Two or more races 6% 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 4% 10%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 23%N/A68%
Female 51%N/A49%
Male 49%N/A51%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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2660 Eastman Crossing SE
Albuquerque, NM 87106
Phone: (505) 508-3295

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