Advertisement
Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

Santa Fe High School

Public | 9-12

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

2 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

32 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted June 12, 2005

I am going to SFHS next year as a sophmore, and I find that most of the people who attend SFHS are ablivious to government,general math, reading, and writing.Some teachers I have even met cannot spell simple words, or phrases, or even know basic multiplication. Most students who work hard are at risk of being harmed by other students who choose to slack off. the small learning community isolated students from the rest of the campus. I take all AP classes and I find they are similar to what normal classes should be like. - Lauren
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 15, 2005

I think that Santa FE high School is a school that has high expectations with some wonderful teachers. Though I do think that the Principal should take a closer look at what is best for the students. i.e. The small learning community. My child comes home complaining about being isolated from her friends and how many of the teachers are planning on quitting if they get stuck teaching in the S.L.C's. The elections the school has to offer is the best Santa FE and has many classes that are not available anywhere else in the state. This is truly the best school in New Mexico to send my child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 8, 2005

I am a parent of a daughter who attends SFHS. This is her first year as a freshman and a new transfer student to New Mexico. I am also a student myself at a local college. My daughter has been put into a class with a bunch of rowdy teens who do not want to take the class serious which in turn has affected her grades, because the teacher cannot control the class. And it appears to me the teachers love giving out tardies and making it point to discipline students who show up to school/class and are never late and who do the class work and seem to be the good students in their class.There is not enough information sent home to inform the parents of grades reports, extracurricular activities,pictures, or problems on campus. Our children are old enough to take some responsibilty, but we pay the taxes! I want to see results!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 12, 2005

The board members care only a little for extracurricular activities. They can do better on listening to students' opinions. Students are not focused. Teachers should care more.
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 16, 2004

My Son currently attends SFHS, and I must say that this has to be one of the most incredibally lousy schools in the country ( the others probably being from here). The administration is completly unhelpful, the secretaries even more so, and this is when it isn't busy. Speaking about the administration, they will only talk to parents when there is a 'problem' with your child i.e disiplinary. The students are mostly fine, but gang activity is ever present. There isn't really any place for them to 'hang-out' when it's cold, and the cafeteria is know to run out of food before serving most. The staff really could care less about your child unless your child shows he/she truly wants to learn ( and how many children actually show do show that kind of emotion?).
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 24, 2004

Both my daughters went there and one did well and one did not. A child at Santa Fe High School must want to learn, because the school personnel could care less whether a child is not doing well or not. The counselors do not help the students plan for their future, they don't even help with the college process. (The administraters set rules that have nothing to do with the learning process. (They also love to make tardy policy, but they don't mind pulling kids out of class for suspension and assemblies).
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 14, 2003

The deversity makes this school awesome!!!


Posted September 22, 2003

I am a senior at Santa Fe High this year. The education can be either good or horrible, depending on how you apply yourself. If you choose to slack off ( which is very contagious) you can expect to fail. There are very few teachers who listen to, and teach their students thouroghly. Luckily I have two fantastic teachers that I can count on!If I could start all over, I would definitely work harder the second time around. My advice for students is to work to your fullest ability, and you will go far!!


Posted August 26, 2003

I am a current student at Santa Fe High and I feel that the quality of education depends on the classes that you choose to take. I have found now as a junior that the quality of teachers improve as the difficulty of the class increases. Stick to honors and ap classes and preperation for college will be just as good as anywhere else.


Posted August 10, 2003

Although I am not a parent, I am a 2000 graduate of Santa Fe High School. SFHS's only goal is to get students through school, not to prepare them for college or life after high school. When I went onto college, I was told that its very rare for a SFHS graduate to enter into freshman english, they usually need a pre-freshman english class or two. If I was a parent, I would seriously think twice before sending my child to school at SFHS. The only good thing about SFHS was the principal we had for a year to a year and a half. He would personally interact with the students at lunch and give us daily morning announcements. None of the principals that I had after and before him never put that kind of energy into it.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted June 12, 2003

I'm not exactly a parent; I am actually a graduate from the 2000 class. I now attend a four year private university in California, called the University of the Pacific. In high school I took all honors classes and graduated with a 3.225 GPA, and my parents were very involved in my education. Since I have been in college I have found myself to be unprepared academically, and na ve to even the simplest things like the how our government operates. I would advise all parents to become involved in their children s education, not only at home but also in the criteria that they are being taught.


Posted June 11, 2003

The quality of education at this school is poor.


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 30% in 2013.

402 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
26%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

401 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
38%

2012

 
 
38%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2013.

338 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
29%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 56% in 2013.

339 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
44%
Science

The state average for Science was 40% in 2013.

333 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Students21%
Female20%
Male22%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic15%
Native American18%
White32%
Economically disadvantaged13%
Students with disabilities2%
English Language Learner Current2%
English Language Learner Exited12%

Reading

All Students38%
Female45%
Male31%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic31%
Native American24%
White51%
Economically disadvantaged29%
Students with disabilities17%
English Language Learner Current4%
English Language Learner Exited29%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Students39%
Female37%
Male41%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic29%
Native Americann/a
White65%
Economically disadvantaged26%
Students with disabilities9%
English Language Learner Current17%
English Language Learner Exited24%

Reading

All Students58%
Female64%
Male50%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic51%
Native Americann/a
White76%
Economically disadvantaged48%
Students with disabilities15%
English Language Learner Current20%
English Language Learner Exited35%

Science

All Students44%
Female41%
Male50%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic37%
Native Americann/a
White64%
Economically disadvantaged28%
Students with disabilities16%
English Language Learner Current7%
English Language Learner Exited24%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

The state average for Math was 38% in 2011.

276 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
30%

2010

 
 
33%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2011.

276 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
42%

2010

 
 
60%
Science

The state average for Science was 39% in 2011.

276 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
34%

2010

 
 
31%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 47% in 2011.

276 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
49%

2010

 
 
52%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2010-2011 New Mexico used the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test students in grade 11 in Reading, Math, Science and Social Studies. As of 2012, New Mexico will use only the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in reading and math. The NMHSSA is a standards-based test, which means that it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Students30%
Female26%
Male35%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic22%
Native American8%
White64%
Economically disadvantaged21%
Students with disabilities5%
English language learners7%

Reading

All Students42%
Female44%
Male39%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic35%
Native American42%
White71%
Economically disadvantaged30%
Students with disabilities5%
English language learners3%

Science

All Students34%
Female28%
Male42%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic25%
Native American33%
White71%
Economically disadvantaged24%
Students with disabilities5%
English language learners7%

Social Studies

All Students49%
Female42%
Male57%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic41%
Native American42%
White82%
Economically disadvantaged38%
Students with disabilities5%
English language learners7%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2010-2011 New Mexico used the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test students in grade 11 in Reading, Math, Science and Social Studies. As of 2012, New Mexico will use only the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in reading and math. The NMHSSA is a standards-based test, which means that it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 66% 59%
White 29% 26%
American Indian/Alaska Native 3% 10%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
Black 1% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Two or more races 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 49%N/A68%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


Help other families

Millions of families turn to GreatSchools for help with their
school search. You can help these families by providing
a few details about this school.

Administrators & teachers: Let your school shine!

Help your school shine online by adding program highlights, photos and more on GreatSchools! Get started »

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events found for this school
Searching for school events...
Date
Title
  • {{date}}
    {{title}}
Export calendar
Outlook.com
Microsoft Outlook
iCal Format
Google Calendar
Print Calendar
Uploading, please wait...
POWERED BY
Tandem
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

2100 Yucca Rd
Santa Fe, NM 87505
Phone: (505) 467-2003

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools


Career Academy
Santa Fe, NM


Pnm-Santa Fe
Santa Fe, NM





ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT