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Socorro High School

Public | 9-12

 

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2 stars


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10 reviews of this school


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Posted November 1, 2010

If you think sports is more important than learning, this is the place for your child. The school has been on 'corrective action' status from the NM Dept, of Education for at least four years.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 9, 2010

In May 2010 my son graduated with honors from Socorro High School. I know there are much better schools out there and Socorro High struggles to to keep up but the class of 2010 excelled with out being a posh school that has been given the best money can buy. For the first time since 1977 the 2009 football team made it to state to play against Lovington which may as well be a Texas school. They have all the best for their football program and Socorro has very little. But it was the coaches, students and teachers who rose to the challenge. I must admit I have been to much better graduations where again they have the best money can buy and this years SHS commencement exercise was not the best but it was the teachers, students and parents who made the best of it without the money.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 10, 2009

Socorro High has some very good teachers as well as a few truly terrible ones. The terrible ones keep teaching year after year. Many of the kids are not interested in school, so teachers end up having to spend time controlling the class. Good students are only challenged by a few classes. However, the school is good about letting kids take classes at New Mexico Tech, which helps. The extracurricular activities are good.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 7, 2007

As a former student of Socorro High School--now enrolled in my second year at the University of New Mexico--I have mixed feelings about my high school experience. I had no trouble adjusting to college life and academics, and I feel that my high school experience did prepare me for what was ahead. The problem was that I was one of the few students at SHS that consistently took advanced, honors and college prep classes. I also participated in many extracurricular activities including sports and academics. I guess my conclusion is that high school is what you make of it. If you stay dedicated to your education it will pay off in the future and the school isn't all to blame.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted August 3, 2007

The school has been on academic probation for almost three years; we have good faculty, for the most part, but an administration on site that believes rules and punishment are more important than high academics. Gangs are bad and reading levels are worse; intelligent, achievement-oriented kids are routinely stuck in a dumbed down curriculum because there are so many students who aren't at grade level and only so many teachers and classrooms to go around.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 1, 2007

If all you want to do is pass the GED, then Socorro high school probably works (if you pay attention). However, there are so many underprivileged children and incompetent teachers (not to mention the incredibly selfish administration), that a child has to be very strong willed not to get ruined by the atmosphere. Even the really awesome teachers have been brought down by the oppressive administration. If you want your children to grow up with high self-esteem and realistic view of the world, do not send them to Socorro High School. If you have to send somebody there, make sure they have something to do which stimulates them after school, so they can keep their sense of individuality and wonder. Band at Socorro High School is good, and Science Olympiad can be, too.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 15, 2007

As a former student and now a parent of a SHS student, I would have to agree with Mr. Castaneda. As a student I did not do well there because of my bad choices and instablility at home. However, I did manage to learn enough to easily pass the GED and go on to college without having to take any remedial courses. I was a teen mother trying to catch up to graduate with my class and found that all of my teachers worked with me and encouraged me to do well as long as I took responsibility. I was afraid my son would not do well there but he has excellelled in advanced classes which are preparing him for college as well as Science Olympiad, Band, Football, Track and Science Bowl. He will take German next year and wants to join other SHS students and teachers on a summer trip to Italy. Thanks SHS!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 13, 2006

This high school gives you the very basics that you need to know to make it through life.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 12, 2005

I feel that the Socorro School System provides a solid, basic educational foundation. I was taught how to read and write and do research, and to recognize and use the the resources that are available to me. However, there is a limit on the level of science and math classes that are available to college bound students. With the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in the backyard, there should be more opportunities (or at least more encouragement from guidance councilors) for advanced students to take more advanced courses at NMIMT. I was also taught that social responsibility lies soley with the individual and with the parents and caretakers of those individuals. The school's responsibilities are to provide basic educational fundamentals (a stepping stone, so to speak), not to raise the children enrolled. Teen pregnancy starts at home. Stop blaming the schools and start taking responsibility for your own actions.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted December 17, 2004

As a former student of this High School I feel let down. I suggest if you want your student to graduate before having a family of their own, take them somewhere else!
—Submitted by a former student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 30% in 2013.

128 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
37%

2012

 
 
22%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

128 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
29%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2013.

104 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
31%

2012

 
 
44%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 56% in 2013.

107 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
48%
Science

The state average for Science was 40% in 2013.

104 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Students37%
Female34%
Male39%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic34%
Native Americann/a
White59%
Economically disadvantaged25%
Students with disabilities7%
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Reading

All Students41%
Female48%
Male36%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic35%
Native Americann/a
White82%
Economically disadvantaged31%
Students with disabilities0%
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Students31%
Female29%
Male33%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic26%
Native Americann/a
White45%
Economically disadvantaged23%
Students with disabilities20%
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Reading

All Students42%
Female47%
Male37%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic38%
Native Americann/a
White58%
Economically disadvantaged31%
Students with disabilities25%
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Science

All Students33%
Female33%
Male32%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic24%
Native Americann/a
White55%
Economically disadvantaged24%
Students with disabilities19%
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

The state average for Math was 38% in 2011.

107 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
31%

2010

 
 
22%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2011.

107 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
28%

2010

 
 
42%
Science

The state average for Science was 39% in 2011.

107 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
38%

2010

 
 
19%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 47% in 2011.

107 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
42%

2010

 
 
18%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2010-2011 New Mexico used the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test students in grade 11 in Reading, Math, Science and Social Studies. As of 2012, New Mexico will use only the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in reading and math. The NMHSSA is a standards-based test, which means that it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Students31%
Female29%
Male32%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic30%
Native Americann/a
White39%
Economically disadvantaged23%
Students with disabilities18%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students28%
Female31%
Male25%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic22%
Native Americann/a
White46%
Economically disadvantaged16%
Students with disabilities0%
English language learnersn/a

Science

All Students38%
Female29%
Male46%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic34%
Native Americann/a
White54%
Economically disadvantaged28%
Students with disabilities24%
English language learnersn/a

Social Studies

All Students42%
Female33%
Male50%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic40%
Native Americann/a
White54%
Economically disadvantaged33%
Students with disabilities53%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2010-2011 New Mexico used the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test students in grade 11 in Reading, Math, Science and Social Studies. As of 2012, New Mexico will use only the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in reading and math. The NMHSSA is a standards-based test, which means that it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 68% 59%
White 22% 26%
American Indian/Alaska Native 6% 10%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 2% 1%
Black 2% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Two or more races 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 48%N/A68%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
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1200 Michigan St
Socorro, NM 87801
Phone: (505) 835-0300

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