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GreatSchools Rating

Tularosa High School

Public | 9-12

 

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Community Rating

3 stars


Teacher quality

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8 reviews of this school


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Posted May 13, 2010

As a former student of THS I have to say that the critism of the teachers is wrong. The staff will go out of their way to help a student who needs some help. I for one should know. They can only teach to the students who want to learn and most don't want to learn. They just want to get out of high school as fast as possible without doing any of the work. They want a free ride. I would have no problem sending or recommending Tularosa High School to anyone.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 30, 2009

I am a former student of THS, I have to agree with some of the other reviewers, in that it was my experience also that the racial views at this school are very bias, but what I find appalling is that they eliminated the music program, that was the only outlet for some of the students, but that shouldn't be surprising to anyone, they have always catered to the athletics crowd, it's all about the money they make by manipulating the students. If you fit in with the certain preferred group, you will do well, if not, they will though you under the bus.


Posted January 7, 2009

Tularosa High School is above average when it comes to facilities and education for a school its size. The staff at Tularosa High School is willing to do what it takes to help the students succeed in and out of the classroom. As a former student I was provided with the opportunity to participate in both athletic and academic extracurricular activities which had a motivated staff to assist in my improvement. Just as any other school, the educational experience is what the student makes of it. Each student has the opportunity to take a more challenging course schedule if they so choose. In doing just that, I was able to perpare myself for some of the more difficult college courses. I was far more prepared than other college students that came from schools that were able to offer AP courses. Tularosa High gave me a great start toward my Engineering degree.


Posted June 23, 2006

I think it is ironic that the people critizing the teachers at THS are themselves barely literate. An important point to rememeber is that the faculty's first responsibility is to educate the students. I am a result of the Tularosa educational system and feel as though my former teachers did a good job educating me. They provided me with a solid foundation which helped me become successful in college, the military and the real world. Another point that must be made is education starts at home. I would not hesitate to enroll a child in the Tularosa school system.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted December 20, 2005

My child goes to Tularosa High, but doesn't know a thing. Why you may ask? The teachers. They do not take time to listen and are always worried about other activities such as Homecoming. Another concern is that the teachers favor athletes giving extra credit even though the student may not have earned it so that they would be elidgible for the oncoming season. They may have to do this because of the fact the school is so small but come on, what about the students who have earned it. This has happened many times throughout my child attendence to Tularosa Schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 26, 2005

My granddaughter goes to THS and a better school I cannot imagine. Teachers are very student oriented and work well with parents in all areas. The school is small so music and AP classes are not available, but the small class size and rural atmosophere more than make up for it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 23, 2004

This school takes there time a drag there feet for other races and they dont think of the childs education they just think of only kids with good back grounds and the one's with bad one they judge them and they should be willing to give some of them kids chances to correct there mistakes in life.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 16, 2004

The teachers at Tularosa High School fail to teach my children a sence responsibility, they don't try to comunicate with the students. My children have become highly racest.If anything was to happen at school and it was a Native American that was responsible for the actions that occured, all Native American would be put down for the actions of one. And another thing is that the teachers are very judgemental about how the students look, dress, and what color they are. So in result of all of this I think that Tularosa High School teachers and staff need to be more aware and involved in whats going on with the students. If these actions were to be carried out we as a community would be very pleased! Thanks!


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 30% in 2013.

68 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
24%

2012

 
 
25%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

68 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
35%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

The state average for Math was 42% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
13%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 56% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
28%
Science

The state average for Science was 40% in 2013.

62 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Students24%
Female33%
Male16%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic22%
Native American7%
White44%
Economically disadvantaged24%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Reading

All Students47%
Female47%
Male47%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic49%
Native American33%
White56%
Economically disadvantaged47%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Students33%
Female34%
Male31%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic32%
Native American30%
White32%
Economically disadvantaged33%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Reading

All Students53%
Female72%
Male31%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic58%
Native American50%
White42%
Economically disadvantaged53%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a

Science

All Students47%
Female46%
Male48%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic47%
Native American30%
White53%
Economically disadvantaged47%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English Language Learner Currentn/a
English Language Learner Exitedn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New Mexico used the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in Reading and Math, and grades 4, 7 and 11 in Science. The NMSBA did not report Science results in 2012. As of 2012, New Mexico no longer uses the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test high school students, and instead uses the NMSBA to test high school students. The NMSBA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

The state average for Math was 38% in 2011.

62 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
27%

2010

 
 
29%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2011.

62 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
44%

2010

 
 
53%
Science

The state average for Science was 39% in 2011.

62 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
34%

2010

 
 
33%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 47% in 2011.

62 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
47%

2010

 
 
50%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2010-2011 New Mexico used the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test students in grade 11 in Reading, Math, Science and Social Studies. As of 2012, New Mexico will use only the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in reading and math. The NMHSSA is a standards-based test, which means that it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Math

All Students27%
Female26%
Male28%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic19%
Native Americann/a
White38%
Economically disadvantaged27%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students44%
Female57%
Male36%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic45%
Native Americann/a
White46%
Economically disadvantaged44%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English language learnersn/a

Science

All Students34%
Female39%
Male31%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic29%
Native Americann/a
White42%
Economically disadvantaged34%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English language learnersn/a

Social Studies

All Students47%
Female44%
Male49%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic55%
Native Americann/a
White38%
Economically disadvantaged47%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2010-2011 New Mexico used the New Mexico High School Standards Assessment (NMHSSA) to test students in grade 11 in Reading, Math, Science and Social Studies. As of 2012, New Mexico will use only the New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment (NMSBA) to test students in grades 3 through 8, 10 and 11 in reading and math. The NMHSSA is a standards-based test, which means that it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined by the state of New Mexico. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the New Mexico Public Education Department. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 48% 59%
White 30% 26%
American Indian/Alaska Native 21% 10%
Black 1% 2%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Two or more races 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 99%N/A68%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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1305 8th St
Tularosa, NM 88352
Phone: (505) 585-8800

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