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GreatSchools Rating

Brooklyn Collegiate A College Board School

Public | 6-12 & ungraded | 580 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

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14 reviews of this school


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Posted July 24, 2012

If you want your child to succeed, i recommend you not send your child to this school. Only a palm full of teachers care about the students and they just sent away some of those teachers due to budget cuts. The high school students set a bad example for the middle school students by introducing them to things they are not to know. Every year the charter school takes over more classes that belong to the middle school. The principal always talks as if the school is the best but its not and she does nothing to change that. If you ask me, all she cares about is the high school and the basketball team. I don't think she is sad that the middle school will be closing in 2015 because of bad grades. The high school is not how a high school should be. It doesn't have enough space, teachers, or resources. They do not provide things that prepare the students for college and the school is highly infested with rats and roaches. When I found this out, I took my child out quick. Save all the stress and do not send your child to Brooklyn Collegiate.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 1, 2011

She micro-manage her staff, does not listen to her staff and other faculty members. Lack of collaboration among teachers and other staff members Staff turnover ratio is one of the highest in the area and therefore, affects student s performance. Ms. Sais mission and vision statement does not reflect student s achievement. Lack of Parents support BC need parents to be visible in the school build- help us educate your child/children Parents do not attend PTA or SLT meeting (get involved) five parents at a PTA member does not reflect the total student s population. As a former teacher, Brooklyn Collegiate it breaks my heart-reading parents and students post. I do understand BC has its faults however, I truly believe if parents, teachers, students, and community members collaborate together we can help in saving BC. Parents if you want a good or excellent school you must remember to achieve this it takes all stakeholders. Get involved and help BC become a five star school. Let us not play the blame game
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted July 27, 2011

This one the worst schools in the city. Middle school or High school. The principal does nothing when you as a parent try to make an appointment to speak with her, she sends someone else to meet with you. there's a handful of faculty that actually care about the students. the gangs over run the school and they run the halls with their pants hanging down. ms. sais only cares about the basketball team which does other illegal things pertaining to recruiting violations and the students are not very well prepared for the recent exams. my son actually excelled when I transferred him to a different school, it became less stressful for him to maintain his thought process. I'm a parent that disliked this school extremely and wish it apon no other parent!!! This not the school for your child!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 5, 2011

horrible an deceitful staff i can count on one hand the teachers that are there for the students
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 6, 2010

This is a horrible school the princpal doesn't get it the dean is unfair if your not a 85 or above or if you don't play for the school basketball team they don't care about you the teachers hold agruge and bad mouth students when they are angry save yourself and your child the heart ache pick another school for them to go to
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 13, 2010

My son attends Brooklyn Collegiate and he was one of the first boys to attend this school in the 6th grade when they first opened there doors in September 2005. He is now a junior and doing great things in BC. The principal and the rest of the staff at BC are friendly and welcoming. When he graduates next year, he will have graduated from a great school. GO BC LIONS!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 12, 2009

Execellent middle school. Great teachers and Principal.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 18, 2009

the students hardly understand what they learn in that school
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 1, 2008

As a senior student at brooklyn collegiate i would not recommend sending your child their.I been in the school for 4 yrs and it is just getting worse by the hour,fights,every yr we have new teachers, a number of staffs leaving because of the principal, unsatifactory behavior by students and faculty. The principal just dont get it and shes in the building sporadically.She breaths down the teachers and students neck for no reason and she is all about talks.Nothing in the high school directory is real except the uniform policy.Ms. Sias is not connecting with the sudents nor staff members.As of right now their is no guidance counselors and some of the teachers have a bad attendance.I personally dont care for this school because alot of the good staff left and now we're a sinking ship. No proper foundation and realistic rules and policies. I cant wait to leave that school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 22, 2008

I agree with the other parents, this is a horrible school. I do not reccommend this school. In orientation thhe principal gives you this lond speech how she's for the kid, she has and open door, blah, blah and blah. The jids wear their pants sagging and run around like they are crazy. I am removing my svild from this scholl ASAP!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 18, 2008

this school is horrible...... students fighting, bus drivers getting lost, very extremely strict uniform policy
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 27, 2008

This school is great, they really prepare your child for college, and they assist your child into getting into the college of his/her choice. my son got into some of the top universities in the country, (Fordham University, University of Vermont, Boston University...). some of his classmates got accepted into top schools such as Cornell University, Carnegie-Mellon University, Rutgers University, Penn-State, St. Johns...etc. i definitely recommend this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 15, 2008

The principal does not care about the students well being...i think she just needs funds for the school so it can stay open...the staff does not make u feel welcomed or wanted at all....even if u try your hardest to pass a class they still fail you...i think it's all about favorites in that school, plus more and more fights break out each day.This is how i feel ,and i know a lot of others feel the same way.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 2, 2007

this school is great, it has a great faculty, small student body but yet has some of the finest students in new york state.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
27%

2011

 
 
53%
Math

The state average for Math was 30% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
13%

2011

 
 
33%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 31% in 2013.

40 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
5%

2012

 
 
27%

2011

 
 
26%
Math

The state average for Math was 27% in 2013.

40 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
3%

2012

 
 
33%

2011

 
 
29%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 33% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
8%

2012

 
 
21%

2011

 
 
16%
Math

The state average for Math was 27% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
13%

2012

 
 
27%

2011

 
 
24%
Science

The state average for Science was 69% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2011

 
 
32%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students5%
Female5%
Male5%
African American3%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant5%

Math

All Students3%
Female0%
Male5%
African American3%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant3%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students8%
Female12%
Male4%
African American6%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged9%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant8%

Math

All Students13%
Female12%
Male15%
African American12%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged11%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant13%

Science

All Students39%
Female39%
Male37%
African American37%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged37%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant39%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

Algebra II/Trigonometry

The state average for Algebra II/Trigonometry was 66% in 2013.

19 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
37%

2012

 
 
56%

2011

 
 
22%
Chemistry

The state average for Chemistry was 76% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
54%
Earth Science

The state average for Earth Science was 72% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
31%

2012

 
 
18%

2011

 
 
51%
English

The state average for English was 77% in 2013.

79 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
81%
French

The state average for French was 95% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 74% in 2013.

49 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
16%

2012

 
 
30%

2011

 
 
48%
Global History and Geography

The state average for Global History and Geography was 71% in 2013.

142 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
51%

2011

 
 
55%
Integrated Algebra

The state average for Integrated Algebra was 73% in 2013.

176 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
48%

2011

 
 
57%
Italian

The state average for Italian was 98% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Living Environment

The state average for Living Environment was 77% in 2013.

140 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
42%

2011

 
 
65%
Physics

The state average for Physics was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Spanish

The state average for Spanish was 94% in 2011.

22 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
100%
U.S. History and Government

The state average for U.S. History and Government was 80% in 2013.

47 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
49%

2012

 
 
37%

2011

 
 
52%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Regents Examinations to test high school students in English, math, global history and geography, US history and government, living environment, chemistry, Earth science and physics. Students must take at least five Regents Exams in order to graduate. Scores of 65 and above are passing; scores of 55 and above earn credit toward a local diploma (with the approval of the local board of education). The goal is for all students to pass the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

Algebra II/Trigonometry

All Students37%
Female18%
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population37%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English37%
Non-migrant37%

Chemistry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Non-migrantn/a

Earth Science

All Students31%
Female44%
Male9%
African American32%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged36%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English31%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant31%

English

All Students51%
Female61%
Male39%
African American49%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged52%
Not economically disadvantaged47%
Students with disabilities18%
General population55%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English54%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant51%

Geometry

All Students16%
Female22%
Male12%
African American14%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged14%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English16%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant16%

Global History and Geography

All Students45%
Female41%
Male47%
African American44%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged43%
Not economically disadvantaged52%
Students with disabilities15%
General population52%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English46%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant45%

Integrated Algebra

All Students42%
Female45%
Male40%
African American43%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic54%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged41%
Not economically disadvantaged52%
Students with disabilities19%
General population48%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English43%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant42%

Living Environment

All Students42%
Female44%
Male40%
African American40%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic54%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged44%
Not economically disadvantaged32%
Students with disabilities13%
General population46%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant42%

Physics

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Non-migrantn/a

U.S. History and Government

All Students49%
Female55%
Male37%
African American49%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged49%
Not economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population54%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English55%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant49%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Regents Examinations to test high school students in English, math, global history and geography, US history and government, living environment, chemistry, Earth science and physics. Students must take at least five Regents Exams in order to graduate. Scores of 65 and above are passing; scores of 55 and above earn credit toward a local diploma (with the approval of the local board of education). The goal is for all students to pass the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

In 2009-2010, this school was given a grade of "D" for the middle school level. The school received a grade of "C" for the high school level.

About the tests


Progress Report Grades measure the school's contribution to student learning in three areas: School Environment, Student Performance and Student Progress. Schools can receive additional credit for achieving exemplary performance progress among high-needs students. Progress Report Grades range from A to F.

Source: New York City Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 2 88% 19%
Hispanic 2 8% 23%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 1 2% 9%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1 1% 1%
White 1 1% 48%
Two or more races 1 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012
Source: 2 NYSED, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Limited English proficient 22%N/A8%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 282%N/A43%
Source: 1 NYSED, 2011-2012
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Fewer than 3 years experience 4%N/A5%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree and above 50%N/A39%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012

Teacher credentials

  This school District averageState average
Teachers with no valid teaching certificate 0%N/A0%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012
The NYC Department of Education asked parents, teachers and students about their school's learning environment. Results provide insight into school climate, such as whether the school is academically rigorous, safe, communicative and collaborative. Learn more

The information captured by the survey is designed to support a dialogue among all members of the school community about how to make the school a better place to learn. An overall category score is calculated for each respondent group (parents, teachers, or students) by averaging the scores of the questions within that survey category.

Category scores for each of the respondent groups are then combined to form overall category scores. Alongside the results for each school are the aggregated results across all NYC public schools, which are provided as a basis for comparisons.

Learn more about the NYC DOE survey »Close
Based on 414 responses

This school provides ... 1

A safe and respectful environmentWhat's this?

This score measures whether parents, students and teachers feel that the school creates a physically and emotionally secure environment in which everyone can focus on student learning.

Close
 
This school
7.0
out of 10
 
City average
8.0
out of 10
 

Parents

This school

 
8.0
 

City average

 
8.4
 

Students

This school

 
5.2
 

City average

 
7.2
 

Teachers

This school

 
7.8
 

City average

 
8.0
 
Clear, useful communication about educational goalsWhat's this?

This score measures whether parents, students and teachers feel that the school provides information about the school's educational goals and offers appropriate feedback on each student's learning outcome.

Close
 
This school
7.3
out of 10
 
City average
8.1
out of 10
 

Parents

This school

 
8.0
 

City average

 
8.5
 

Students

This school

 
6.9
 

City average

 
7.8
 

Teachers

This school

 
7.1
 

City average

 
7.8
 
Strong parent, teacher and student engagementWhat's this?

This score measures how engaged parents, students and teachers feel they are in an active and vibrant partnership to promote student learning.

Close
 
This school
7.0
out of 10
 
City average
7.8
out of 10
 

Parents

This school

 
7.6
 

City average

 
8.1
 

Students

This school

 
5.9
 

City average

 
7.2
 

Teachers

This school

 
7.5
 

City average

 
7.8
 
High academic expectations for all studentsWhat's this?

This score measures how well parents, students and teachers feel that the school develops rigorous and meaningful academic goals that encourage students to do their best.

Close
 
This school
7.7
out of 10
 
City average
8.2
out of 10
 

Parents

This school

 
8.0
 

City average

 
8.3
 

Students

This school

 
7.2
 

City average

 
8.1
 

Teachers

This school

 
7.8
 

City average

 
8.1
 

Based on surveys from:

 RespondentsResponse rate
Parents10625%
Students29767%
Teachers1139%

12012-2013 New York City Department of Education School Survey

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • MR. AMOTE SIAS

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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2021 Bergen St
Brooklyn, NY 11233
Phone: (718) 922-1145

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