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GreatSchools Rating

City Honors School At Fosdick Masten Park

Public | 5-12

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 6 ratings

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29 reviews of this school


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Posted December 3, 2013

I believe City Honors has been an excellent influence on my daughter. Honestly, I just love it because she does. She has been challenged and has never enjoyed school more. Her social life has flourished and on occasion I hear her friends screaming cute nicknames like Thot and Tubgirl as she walks up the stairs. ( I guess they like her body sprays!) These are some of the friendliest kids out there, once a week her friends even offer her a tossed salad! Who knew that after a few months kids could become so close?! In this liberal community, students are self-empowered and although I questioned her change in clothing, she explained to me that a personal identity is encouraged in school. The only problem is that I believe the area needs some fumigation because I can't help but smell skunk whenever I drive by. Hopefully my daughter continues to explore this path set out to her, and grows in this culturally free environment. Thanks City Honors!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 22, 2012

I hate this school with most fiery of passions. The academics were decent, but not superb as can be demonstrated by the fact that the pass rates for some regents exams are laughably low for an honors school. The student body creates a very hostile environment, and some of the teachers spread rumors and trash talk students. In fact, one time I saw a teacher spreading a malicious rumor about a student and asked him why the teacher did it, the response was, I kid you not, "To embarrass him [the student]." A lot of times, students behave with impunity and at other times, administration is arbitrarily stringent in enforcement of school rules. Since GreatSchools won't publish reviews that name students, teachers or staff, I will just say that some students had bullied and harassed another student for months on end and received no punishment for what they did. After graduating from this atrocious institution, I realized that high school literature courses killed my joy in reading. The mathematics department is nearly a joke. The sciences are particularly weak. Overall, terrible high school with a horrible environment. Wish I could go back in time and gone to a different high school.


Posted June 8, 2012

As a parent of two recent graduates, I can say that I would choose City Honors again in a heart beat. My children grew into extraordinarily well-educated young adults who are also well-rounded, empathetic, independent thinking, and globally conscious, They were a part of a wonderfully diverse student body (both racially and socioeconomically). Their social experience was extremely positive. They have made life-long friendships with peers and teachers alike.The school offered a multitude of social, athletic, and creative outlets and offered many opportunities for personal growth and community involvement. The IB curriculum is a premier education model, from which both kids benefited greatly, including the awarding of full college scholarships and college sophomore status upon their high school graduation. The administration of City Honors is hard working, extremely competent, involved, and caring. Students are expected to work diligently and to apply themselves at City Honors. If a student is not so minded, and/or if a parent is not prepared to support their child in that effort, there is no point in being there. CHS enjoys multiple top 10 national rankings. Absolutely no regrets!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 10, 2012

City honors has thus far surpassed my expectations . I feel if my child takes advantage of what is being offered. She can achieve what ever she sets out to achieve. The decision is truely up to her. The bottom line for me is that she is being exposed and academically challeneged. The bulk of our public and even charter schools are lagging behind , I hate to say this, it pains me to say this , but there are high schools in our city that are nothing more then teenage waste lands. I base this on graduation rates and college acceptance percentages. As for my child this free ,public education , if nothing else has my child on the right track.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 21, 2011

Honestly, the four years I have spent at City Honors for high school were the most miserable years of my life. It's been a couple of years since I graduated, and I still feel the sting of the bullying and harassment I suffered at the hands of peers, both those my age and even younger, and occasionally even teachers. I feel like I had so much more potential and could have succeeded to a larger extent in a less hostile environment. Instead, City Honors crushed my sense of self-worth and esteem. It got so bad that somedays I would just dread walking into school and felt lousy at the end of the day after an entire day's worth of ostracism and rude behavior from students. Academically, the school's pass rates on AP exams and some regents are laughably low for an "honors" school. The IB program is a scam, and does very little to prepare a student for college and earns the student almost zero credits anywhere. I do applaud the school for its socioeconomic diversity, but the student body is very racially segregated. Some teachers are pretty good (Jurich, Crane, Stephens, Roche, Franke, etc) but many are indeed washed out. Overall, my experience at this school was less than satisfactory.


Posted November 18, 2011

I'm a freshman at Honors; it's my first year attending the school and I can honestly say it does not live up to any expectations. I came to Honors to be academically challenged and surrounded by peers with the same thrive for knowledge. I found out quite quickly that this simply is not the case. The students are not as gifted as many seem to think; one of my peers stated that when the Earth goes behind the Sun, the Sun casts a shadow on the Earth. Many of them simply arrive at Honors in fifth grade and lose all thrive for a higher education within a few months. Also, while some teachers are truly fantastic, many are quite the opposite. The coursework is mediocre at best; I've put minimal effort into all of my courses and I'm receiving grades ranging from 95-103. It's also a terrible social environment. The school is excessively clique-y; I've already been shoved into the "losers" clique (which I don't mind at all; I love my friends), and many people won't talk to me just because of it. I was cyber-bullied by a student before I even started classes in September. All in all, honors is really just a letdown and I wish I'd chosen a different school to attend for the next four years.


Posted November 2, 2011

I am a CHS parent. City Honors is part of the Buffalo Public Schools. It does a great job fulfilling its mission as the accelerated honors magnet for the City of Buffalo. The school is newly renovated & has a flourishing International Baccalaureate Program (IB). It is also a school that does not allow the students to avoid intellectual challenges. Everyone takes 3 AP courses & 1 IB course in high school. ALL students go off to college being extremely well prepared to meet the challenges of higher education. Additionally, administrators take time away from their own families to come to away games and meets. Many of the teachers do the same. I would say 95% of the teachers come in early, stay late, and are extremely dedicated. I've never seen a school with so many clubs & afterschool activities. The dedication of a vast majority of the faculty is truly remarkable. That said, City Honors IS a public school, so it does not have the same resources that private schools (with $15,000-$20,000/year tuitions). Students also cannot avoid the mandatory challenging courses. If you want your child to receive the BEST POSSIBLE grades 5-12 education in WNY, then City Honors is it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 2, 2011

I graduated from City Honors two years ago, and though I'm not sure how much has changed in the years I've been gone, I can say my experience within the school was not a pleasant one. Many people have a multitude of illusions about the school, and how it's supposedly so much better than others. That's not at all true. It's a school full of gifted children and young adults who are forced into classes they might not want to take, forced to pay for (if they're not unfortunate enough to be able to have them paid for) and take advanced (AP and IB) exams- usually for the same classes they had no interest in. The administration cares only for their own school ratings, and most will not help you in any way if you're struggling. There also seems to be a misconception about the teachers. Most are washed out, waiting for their retierment, and only about half come in early enough for a student to seek help before it's time for homeroom. A lot of teachers stay after, as well, but because they're running clubs. Only a few offer help. Also, unless your child goes through the rigor of being full IB, they will be looked down upon and offered less help preparing for college than the others.


Posted November 1, 2011

Teachers do not make a school. The intellect and ability of a student does. I am a freeman a City Honors, and have been severely disappointed. City Honors was always held to be this kind of Mecca for students, it has been seen as the only school worth caring about in Buffalo. This, however, and according to many other students, not parents who have bought into the falsehoods that this schools past great deeds have earned it, is false. Teachers at CHS are only average, assigning mediocre work and just prepping us for mindless sate exams. Administration is severely flawed, as well. Teachers live in fear that they, too could be laid off by our train wreck of a school board. New teachers are belittled and hazed be ones with "Tenure", who have long since burnt out and lost any passion for their profession, and now just talk at a class instead of actively teaching them. City Honors may have used to be a great school, and is no longer, but parents who believe that they know over their own children have told the media, and the country, otherwise. It's time to expose CHS as the disaster that it is.


Posted February 11, 2011

I am a freshman at City Honors and I've been going there since 5th grade, and I absolutely love it. If I had to go to any other high school, I would break down. I've made so many wonderful friends and I'm associated with countless other fantastic students. I have no idea where the review below me came from because it's definitely not true, I have never been bullied nor have I witnessed or heard of anyone being bullied at this school, EVER. And the school's location may be slightly challenging, considering the fact that we don't have a field for soccer, football, lacrosse or rugby, but it definitely doesn't impair our activities. We play after school in Delaware park or at other schools, and we can condition in the gym, pool, fitness room, or the sketchy park across the street. At this school we have IB, which is a program that most students in Buffalo don't get. It gives us an opportunity to earn up to a full year of college credits, saving parents 10s of thousands of dollars. We're encouraged to pursue art, music, sports, clubs, and volunteering, and I couldn't ask for a school that better suits me.


Posted December 5, 2010

Admittedly, the academics of this school are, for obvious reasons, superb. Save for a few lapses in teacher quality, this school is among the best of the best in western New York. However, one should be aware that though academics are the primary reason for attending a school, being immersed in a poor environment not conducive to learning or succeeding cancels the quality academics. I am a graduate from the class of 2010, and never in my life have I been so bullied, slandered, and overall miserable in a school. Some of the teachers even engaged in spreading malicious rumors about me. Many of my friends felt the same way. I did decently academically, but had it not been for the incessant bullying and yes, even harassment, from other students, I might have succeeded even more so. I am now happily in college, which is quite a few times more difficult than City Honors. But why do I succeed here? It's because I have peers who respect me and treat me with dignity. Feel free to disagree if you'd like, but the four years spent at City Honors were possibly the worst four years of my life.


Posted October 12, 2010

I go to this school and it's not as great as these parents seem to be saying. I'm a senior and I don't think it's really fair for the parents to be commenting on a school they don't go to. It has a wonderful reputation, true, but the administration is absolutely terrible and there's little to no social life within the student population. Frankly, school spirit is minimal. This school is also extremely cliquey. People tend to gravitate towards their one group of friends and stay there. It is an unhealthy and extremely competitive environment. Students are also forced into classes they have no interest in. Some of my friends are taking Latin 1 in their senior year because there are no other electoral options. I don't mean to deteer anyone from a great education, I'm just being honest. I wish I knew this before I enrolled.


Posted May 9, 2010

City honors has a wonderful academic reputation. It test scores are very high and the kids there are bright and extremely hard working. My daughter loved her time there and has done very well since graduating. However, to use the term 'elite' is not at all appropriate and misleading for people considering this school versus private education. There is a great deal of socio-economic and ethnic diversity here, which has to be something you are comfortable with in a high school environment.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 19, 2010

I love City Honors mostly because my daughter loves it. She is in her 1st year there and is thriving both academically and socially. She is challenged daily and keeps rising to the challenges that are posed to her. This is truly a special school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 19, 2010

I had 4 kids attend City Honors. I love the fact they made life long friends with all different backgrounds. That kind of education can't be taught. I also love the attitute portrayed. It is like they say 'OK. we know you're smart but what else have you got?' Which is why the school also excels in both sports and performing arts.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 16, 2010

The recognition speaks for itself. City Honors is an elite school that accelerates its students far beyond those of other schools.


Posted April 13, 2010

It is one of the best schools in the Country - a challenging curriculum, supportive atmosphere, creative students and teachers and involved parents as well as a top ranking!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 3, 2009

We had such high hopes for our gifted son's education at this school. The truth is that this school cares more about it's statistics than the individual child. The program is rigid and traditional and focuses on academic 'acceleration' above creative problem solving, critical thinking or social development. They make claims to 'critical thinking', '21st century learning' and 'global citizenship' but the truth is that your 'bright' child is simply being pushed very hard to achieve the schools' statistical goal of over 50% of graduating students in the IB Diploma Program. Critical thinkers and global citizens consistently question the world around them, including the standards of the the culture they live in. This is not encouraged at City Honors.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 3, 2009

The education my daughter received supported and furthered her foundation and love for learning.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2009

Wonderful teachers and students and a great learning environment. We're very fortunate to have such a great public school in Buffalo.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 31% in 2013.

90 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
91%
Math

The state average for Math was 30% in 2013.

91 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
90%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 30% in 2013.

91 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
95%
Math

The state average for Math was 30% in 2013.

91 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
94%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 31% in 2013.

112 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
93%
Math

The state average for Math was 27% in 2013.

112 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
97%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 33% in 2013.

117 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
90%
Math

The state average for Math was 27% in 2013.

116 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
90%
Science

The state average for Science was 69% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
17%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students70%
Female74%
Male66%
African American57%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White73%
Economically disadvantaged70%
Not economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilities23%
General population78%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English70%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant70%

Math

All Students80%
Female85%
Male75%
African American64%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White83%
Economically disadvantaged71%
Not economically disadvantaged83%
Students with disabilities38%
General population87%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English80%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant80%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students74%
Female83%
Male66%
African American44%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White81%
Economically disadvantaged52%
Not economically disadvantaged82%
Students with disabilities18%
General population83%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English74%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant74%

Math

All Students85%
Female91%
Male77%
African American57%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White91%
Economically disadvantaged60%
Not economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disabilities27%
General population93%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English85%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant85%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students78%
Female89%
Male68%
African American68%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White85%
Economically disadvantaged71%
Not economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilities20%
General population83%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English78%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant78%

Math

All Students74%
Female77%
Male71%
African American69%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White79%
Economically disadvantaged70%
Not economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilities20%
General population80%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English74%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant74%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students81%
Female87%
Male71%
African American74%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic91%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White80%
Economically disadvantaged65%
Not economically disadvantaged89%
Students with disabilities43%
General population86%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English81%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant81%

Math

All Students75%
Female77%
Male73%
African American69%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic81%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White75%
Economically disadvantaged57%
Not economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilities35%
General population80%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English75%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant75%

Science

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

Algebra II/Trigonometry

The state average for Algebra II/Trigonometry was 66% in 2013.

133 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
83%
Chemistry

The state average for Chemistry was 76% in 2013.

115 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
94%
Earth Science

The state average for Earth Science was 72% in 2013.

116 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
99%
English

The state average for English was 77% in 2013.

141 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
100%
French

The state average for French was 95% in 2011.

29 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
100%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 74% in 2013.

122 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
95%
Global History and Geography

The state average for Global History and Geography was 71% in 2013.

127 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
99%
Integrated Algebra

The state average for Integrated Algebra was 73% in 2013.

173 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
97%
Italian

The state average for Italian was 98% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Living Environment

The state average for Living Environment was 77% in 2013.

132 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
98%
Physics

The state average for Physics was 81% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
74%
Spanish

The state average for Spanish was 94% in 2011.

60 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
100%
U.S. History and Government

The state average for U.S. History and Government was 80% in 2013.

237 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
100%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Regents Examinations to test high school students in English, math, global history and geography, US history and government, living environment, chemistry, Earth science and physics. Students must take at least five Regents Exams in order to graduate. Scores of 65 and above are passing; scores of 55 and above earn credit toward a local diploma (with the approval of the local board of education). The goal is for all students to pass the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

Algebra II/Trigonometry

All Students83%
Female80%
Male85%
African American74%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White84%
Economically disadvantaged79%
Not economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English83%
Non-migrant83%

Chemistry

All Students90%
Female95%
Male83%
African American86%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White94%
Economically disadvantaged73%
Not economically disadvantaged96%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population91%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English90%
Non-migrant90%

Earth Science

All Students96%
Female100%
Male92%
African American90%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic92%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White98%
Economically disadvantaged91%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilities67%
General population100%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English96%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant96%

English

All Students96%
Female100%
Male95%
African American100%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White96%
Economically disadvantaged89%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population99%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English96%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant96%

Geometry

All Students95%
Female100%
Male89%
African American96%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White94%
Economically disadvantaged85%
Not economically disadvantaged98%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population98%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English95%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant95%

Global History and Geography

All Students97%
Female100%
Male94%
African American97%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White99%
Economically disadvantaged92%
Not economically disadvantaged99%
Students with disabilities80%
General population99%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English97%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant97%

Integrated Algebra

All Students96%
Female99%
Male93%
African American97%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic94%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White97%
Economically disadvantaged91%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilities70%
General population100%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English96%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant96%

Living Environment

All Students97%
Female100%
Male93%
African American95%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged92%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilities75%
General population100%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English97%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant97%

Physics

All Students85%
Female77%
Male91%
African American71%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White89%
Economically disadvantaged72%
Not economically disadvantaged93%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English85%
Non-migrant85%

U.S. History and Government

All Students99%
Female100%
Male99%
African American100%
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanic91%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged99%
Not economically disadvantaged99%
Students with disabilities90%
General population99%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English99%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant99%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Regents Examinations to test high school students in English, math, global history and geography, US history and government, living environment, chemistry, Earth science and physics. Students must take at least five Regents Exams in order to graduate. Scores of 65 and above are passing; scores of 55 and above earn credit toward a local diploma (with the approval of the local board of education). The goal is for all students to pass the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 66% 48%
Black 21% 19%
Hispanic 2 6% 23%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 1 5% 9%
Two or more races 1 2% 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 2 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012
Source: 2 NYSED, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Limited English proficient 20%N/A8%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 227%N/A43%
Source: 1 NCES, 2011-2012
Source: 2 NYSED, 2011-2012

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Fewer than 3 years experience 9%N/A5%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree and above 31%N/A39%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012

Teacher credentials

  This school District averageState average
Teachers with no valid teaching certificate 1%N/A0%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012

This school has not yet provided program information.


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186 E North St
Buffalo, NY 14204
Website: Click here
Phone: (716) 816-4230

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