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GreatSchools Rating

Garden City High School

Public | 9-12 & ungraded | 1186 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

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18 reviews of this school


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Posted August 6, 2014

--I've posted this for Garden City Middle School, but I'm posting this again for GCHS because one of my children goes to this school and I think they both are great.-- This school is the best high school I've ever seen in my life. I moved from Los Angeles many years ago and have lived here ever since. I am now sending my children to this school. They love this school, and so do I. The teachers are very considerate, of great qualities of teaching, and have great teaching methods which are working well not only on my children but also on other kids at school. This school is not very much known for its diversity as other people mentioned below but it doesn't mean it doesn't hold a tolerant attitude towards diversity. Garden City Middle School and High School are great schools no matter who you are, so do not worry about sending your kids to this school even though you are not white or Catholic. No one here judges you by your look or what you believe in. It's ridiculous that some people actually think they do. ---Also, it is true that the students in GC are good at sports, but why has it come to you as a problem? They are also one of the best in academics, etc.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 20, 2013

I have friends who attended this high school and are very proud. Anything and everything they have to say about the high school are all positives. The school system prepares students for college through the required curriculum necessary to graduate high school. In addition, this school provided a high array of honors classes for the over achievers. Located in a picturesque part of Long Island, NY, this school system has been ranked by US News as one of the best high schools in the country.


Posted May 11, 2013

My children have yet to enter the HS but its reputation precedes it. I blame the administration and parents for allowing Athletics to run the show and stupidity for contining the cycle of materialism running rampant both in this town and many others across the country. I can only hope that the tides will change by the time my kids are ready for HS....otherwise I'll move.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 30, 2012

Garden City is not known for its diversity: ethnic, religious, or socio-economic. It is probably the only town on Long Island where a child can be bullied for not being Catholic. Or having dark hair on her arms. This, in and of itself, might not be a move-or-don't-move-here issue if the school's curriculum were richer and the teaching more consistent at every level, especially in grades 2-12. (The K-1 primary schools are quite good.) One cannot talk about the schools without also talking about the Village: a place where sports ALWAYS trump academics. Because of this, the schools--and the community--ultimately suffer. This is a good fit for families with athletically gifted, Catholic, caucasian children. Still, there's a caveat: If, like some of us, you fit that GC mold, does that mean it's a good choice? This town produces exceptional athletes--not well-rounded, intellectual, curious, engaged children. And at the end of the day, isn't that what matters?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 8, 2012

Paying the property taxes I do, I expected alot more from GCHS. There are several schools that blow GC away academically. Schools such as North Shore, Locust Valley, Great Neck South, Great Neck North, Jericho, Manhasset, Wheatley, Oyster Bay, Roslyn and Syosset are all much better. If you are a male and don't play football or lacrosse you are a nobody at the school and will be bullied by the jocks. If you are not one of the super rich with the largest house, you too will be ostracised. The teachers are very average AT BEST. I am not a disgruntled parent whose children are "trouble students." Both of my children were honors students and heavily involved in martial arts.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 30, 2011

The school offers many activities & is very diversified in all areas of studies. They handle issues very well & am satisfied with the overall educational system.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 30, 2011

GREAT EDUCATION, TEACHERS & SPORTS PROGRAMS - MADE VALUABLE FRIENDSHIPS - HELPED PREPARE FOR COLLEGE CLASSES
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 6, 2010

If all the schools in the Garden City school district had to be ranked, GCHS would probably be ranked the lowest. I find GCHS to be average high school academically and no better than any of the surrounding public high schools. There are several things I dislike about this school. Most of the good teachers seem to teach the honors and AP classes, where as most of the mediocre and not so great teachers teach the regents and lower level classes. I don't find any of the programs to be that great (art, music, theatre) except sports. However, sports in this school and community are all based on competition and are not played for the fun and fitness. The demographics of the town of course don't help the school either. Not a bad school but not a fantastic school either. Education is still much better at private high schools.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 5, 2008

I'm an alumna of the Garden City School system and have put 3 children through it. They received a great education, due to hard work and many dedicated, passionate teachers. As in any school district, there is a range of great to awful in the teachers, so students and parents have to accept that and pick up the slack with hard work. My biggest criticism for GCHS is the overemphasis on sports and popularity. Rich parents and a big house are almost a guaranteed admission into the cool crowd, and if you play football, lacrosse or field hockey, you are a superstar. Academic achievement is overshadowed by athletics. My second criticism is of the Guidance Department, who, with their constant emphasis on college admissions, should be more creative in the list of potential schools. As with life, your education is only as good as the work you put into it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 24, 2007

Excellent school, wonderful teachers.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 27, 2005

I had two children in this school. There are many terrific teachers here and the education is here for the asking. One of my children went Ivy the other a 'little ivy' but the intellectual culture of the school could be higher.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 17, 2004

Solid academics but there could be more respect by teachers for students, and definitely more respect by students for teachers. Creativity and acceptance of different points of view are tolerated but not embraced. There is more emphasis on sports than debate{there is no debate team}and popularity. Being 'cool' usually involves liquor,and more soft drugs than parents realize or want to accept. Cheating is accepted by teachers who are tired of students not taking responsibility for themselves.If there was real accountability and conquences, everyone would be better off. Teachers are generally good, but too few are great. We are grateful to them, but only strong leadership from the top can pull everyone together, and allow this school to evolve into all it can be. Meetings are not as important as doing.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 31, 2004

As an alumna of GCHS, I have some history with the school. Many things have improved: the sensitivity of the teachers to students, the music program, and the art department. I would recommend this school for anyone who is interested in a great school for academics, sports, and for music. The art dept. is good too. Top teachers include: Mr. Rebolini & Mr. Schmeider for English, Mr. Sheer for Social Studies, Mr. McCrann for advanced bands, and Mrs. McMahon for art! Many caring parents volunteer, and are willing because of the great teachers. The negatives: some 'militant' parents who demand silly things, and the major division between 'jocks' and 'jock-nots'.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 31, 2004

There's a new Principal for 2004-2005, Mr. Hardy, so principal leadership is still unknown. The previous one retired after almost 15 years and was laid back but did his job well. GCHS has a terrific music program and opportunities for good study achievement. Some teachers are great and inspiring, but it's up to the student to learn. The grads do well in college, which shows they had a good background. 'Sports rules', however, and grabs most of the funding and attention. A miserably non-existent alumni association. All the kids are 'above average', just like at Lake Wobegon. (Pity to poor teacher that rates a kid 'low.') The main drawback is overwhelming emphasis on 'popularity'.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 11, 2004

Garden City Highschool has not only become a place where my children have learned but where they have flourished due to the attention from teachers and for sports the attention of coaching staff. It seems that some people are quick to discredit a school and overlook what it has achieved such as numerous awards both on the playing fields and in the classrooms.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 24, 2004

This school is a true reflection of the Garden City community...spoiled, over-indulged kid with a sense of entitlement - just like their parents. This is a school that is totally afraid to say 'No' to any student acting out for fear (justified!) of immediate parental retribution - against the school! A true example of the denial mentality of the community. As is often said, you can tell you're in Garden City as soon as you cross the moat! We've put three kids into this school - and regretted every experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 16, 2004

Great school in a great community. The learning here got me into one of the top colleges in the country. Plenty of things to do for the students and one the best athletic programs in the country
—Submitted by a former student


Posted March 22, 2004

This school offers a decent education but not for a place for minorities. There is very little acceptance for those who are different. As an Asian, this school was antyhing but a picnic. I don't recomend it unless you are one of the 'good old boys'.
—Submitted by a former student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Algebra II/Trigonometry

The state average for Algebra II/Trigonometry was 66% in 2013.

284 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
89%
Chemistry

The state average for Chemistry was 76% in 2013.

279 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
96%
Earth Science

The state average for Earth Science was 72% in 2013.

162 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
91%
English

The state average for English was 77% in 2013.

312 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
98%
French

The state average for French was 95% in 2011.

20 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
100%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 74% in 2013.

317 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
97%
Global History and Geography

The state average for Global History and Geography was 71% in 2013.

302 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
99%
Integrated Algebra

The state average for Integrated Algebra was 73% in 2013.

167 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
96%
Italian

The state average for Italian was 98% in 2011.

55 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
100%
Living Environment

The state average for Living Environment was 77% in 2013.

321 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
99%
Physics

The state average for Physics was 81% in 2013.

151 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
94%
Spanish

The state average for Spanish was 94% in 2011.

171 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
99%
U.S. History and Government

The state average for U.S. History and Government was 80% in 2013.

285 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
99%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Regents Examinations to test high school students in English, math, global history and geography, US history and government, living environment, chemistry, Earth science and physics. Students must take at least five Regents Exams in order to graduate. Scores of 65 and above are passing; scores of 55 and above earn credit toward a local diploma (with the approval of the local board of education). The goal is for all students to pass the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

Algebra II/Trigonometry

All Students97%
Female97%
Male98%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White97%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities92%
General population97%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English97%
Not migrant97%

Chemistry

All Students97%
Female97%
Male98%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White97%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities100%
General population97%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English97%
Not migrant97%

Earth Science

All Students88%
Female89%
Male87%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White88%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged89%
Students with disabilities66%
General population94%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant88%

English

All Students98%
Female99%
Male98%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander100%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White98%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities82%
General population100%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English98%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant98%

Geometry

All Students98%
Female99%
Male98%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White98%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged98%
Students with disabilities90%
General population99%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English98%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant98%

Global History and Geography

All Students99%
Female99%
Male98%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White99%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged99%
Students with disabilities94%
General population100%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English99%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant99%

Integrated Algebra

All Students96%
Female98%
Male92%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White95%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged96%
Students with disabilities80%
General population100%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant96%

Living Environment

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilities100%
General population100%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant100%

Physics

All Students97%
Female99%
Male94%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White96%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English97%
Not migrant97%

U.S. History and Government

All Students98%
Female98%
Male98%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White98%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities79%
General population100%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English98%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant98%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Regents Examinations to test high school students in English, math, global history and geography, US history and government, living environment, chemistry, Earth science and physics. Students must take at least five Regents Exams in order to graduate. Scores of 65 and above are passing; scores of 55 and above earn credit toward a local diploma (with the approval of the local board of education). The goal is for all students to pass the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 1 95% 48%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 1 2% 9%
Hispanic 2 2% 23%
Black 2 1% 19%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1 0% 1%
Two or more races 1 0% 1%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Limited English proficient 10%N/A8%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 21%N/A43%
Source: 1 NYSED, 2011-2012
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Fewer than 3 years experience 2%N/A5%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree and above 58%N/A39%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012

Teacher credentials

  This school District averageState average
Teachers with no valid teaching certificate 0%N/A0%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012

This school has not yet provided program information.


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170 Rockaway Ave
Garden City, NY 11530
Phone: (516) 478-2000

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