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GreatSchools Rating

Raymond C Buckley Elementary School

Public | K-4 | 398 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

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9 reviews of this school


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Posted April 14, 2013

Lansing is an amazing school!!! The education is top notch. There is a great deal of economic diversity in Lansing which is great. Wealthier families are drawn to the great school system. This is good for all. Wealthier families mean more money to fund great education
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 31, 2013

Wow. Where can I begin? RC Buckley is really bad. Many of the kids are rural hics and are bullies. The Friday note written by the teacher was full of spelling and grammatical errors. I am not impressed by this school at all and am planning on moving!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 26, 2010

I love the schools in Lansing because they go out of their way to make sure the kids get a good education. The teachers at RC Buckley Elementary are awesome, dedicated and caring. They want every child to succeed and do whatever they can to help them to succeed and excel.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 10, 2008

The elementarys school has 3 fulltime AIS teachers (two reading specialists and a math specialist) as well as 3 full time special education teachers, and three teaching assistants to work with kids who struggling. Most elementary school in tompkins county are cutting these services while Lansing has maintained our increased. I have been impressed with the level of services my child has received.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 18, 2008

This school does not have enough attention for young children who are struggling in most subjects.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 18, 2008

I truly love this school as compared to the area schools such as the other rural areas in this county and Ithaca. My son has been attended this school since first grade and I believe it's the best move we've ever made for him and we plan on our 4 year old attending next year. We are trying to stay in this district because we love the school system so much. It is loaded with activities for children and families and I don't believe that it's too snobbish so to speak. My brother graduated from this school and really enjoyed it after he had attended Homer school district most of his life. We are not in the upper class and it doesn't bother us nor does it make us feel out of place. My son is happy. He is biracial also and feel there have been no issues there too.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 4, 2007

I love this school. I attended Lansing from K-12 and now my son is in kindergarten here as well. Yes, this school has been known to carry with it 'snobs'; however, I must clarify that this is false. People misconstrue confidence and self-assurance as snobbish. This school creates people who are confident, intelligent, and will succeed whether college bound or not. Great school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 6, 2007

Although I do agree with Lansing has too many 'snobs'. I also disagree with some other stuff that was written. A school is designed to encourage children to engage in activities and academics that they will use throughout the rest of their lives. I am not paying school taxes and sending my children to school so they can learn to dance or spend the day finger panting and running carefree. Children don't need this, from they day they are born they are all naturally creative, and it is up to the parents to encourage this with play at home, not only at school. Not every child is a 'square peg' I know my child sure isn't, but there is no miracle public school that can fit every childs specific personalities, this wouldn't prepare themselves for the real world anyway.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 14, 2004

Lansing was always supposed to be the great arts school. Changes in principals and being one very large elementary. Has made this school robotic and impersonal. If you like to be upper class and fit into the 'in' crowd f joicks and environmentalists, this school is for you. Most of the educators, not all , seem to have a theory... Jam all children through one program... the old stuffing a square peg through a round hole attitude. If you are a book worm and value nothing else in life, it's a good school. If you believe in children's individuality and creativeness, with less emphasis on making the grade, your child will be lost here. It's all about budgets numbers and excelling. Fantasy land in a very international Ivy league community. They forgot that non college bound kids have potential too... look at Donald Trump. We are not impressed.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 31% in 2013.

91 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
78%
Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

92 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
79%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 30% in 2013.

96 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
38%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
65%
Math

The state average for Math was 36% in 2013.

96 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
77%
Science

The state average for Science was 90% in 2013.

96 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
96%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students39%
Female49%
Male31%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White39%
Economically disadvantaged26%
Not economically disadvantaged47%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population44%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Non-migrant39%

Math

All Students58%
Female65%
Male51%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White57%
Economically disadvantaged38%
Not economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
General population64%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Non-migrant58%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students38%
Female34%
Male41%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White37%
Economically disadvantaged10%
Not economically disadvantaged45%
Students with disabilities0%
General population43%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a

Math

All Students53%
Female46%
Male60%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White56%
Economically disadvantaged25%
Not economically disadvantaged61%
Students with disabilities0%
General population61%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a

Science

All Students95%
Female94%
Male96%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White96%
Economically disadvantaged86%
Not economically disadvantaged98%
Students with disabilities72%
General population98%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 2 87% 48%
Two or more races 1 5% 1%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 2 3% 9%
Hispanic 2 3% 23%
Black 1 2% 19%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1 0% 1%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Limited English proficient 12%N/A8%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 124%N/A43%
Source: 1 NCES, 2011-2012
Source: 2 NYSED, 2011-2012

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Fewer than 3 years experience 3%N/A5%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree and above 53%N/A39%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012

Teacher credentials

  This school District averageState average
Teachers with no valid teaching certificate 0%N/A0%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • MS. CHRISTINE REBERA

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

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284 Ridge Rd
Lansing, NY 14882
Phone: (607) 533-3020

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