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GreatSchools Rating

Great Hollow Middle School

Public | 6-8 | 1010 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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8 reviews of this school


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Posted April 10, 2014

Great hollow is OK if your child had no special needs. My son graduated from there with no issues. However the sports teams is who you know decides if your kid get play time. My daughter has a learning disability and instead of getting the help she needed was simply labeled LAZY. The staff couldn't careless of the needs of individual students that need extra lessons or attention. HORRIBLE
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 28, 2013

AWESOME SCHOOL if you are a natural student that needs little or no attention or guidance. HORRIBLE if you have a child that needs attention or has a learning disability. Did you know that the policy at this school is to PASS EVERYONE. No Joke, Everyone passes no matter what the grade is, and if they aren't passing the teachers will change the grade (it happened to my kid). The district doesn't have a summer school program, they just "move up" the kids until they get into High School. This is the only time the kids need to actually pass a class, but even in this situation, instead of TEACHING STUDENTS they come up with a grading system so your child passes (like they will treat homework like a test grade so they will pass). Again, there is NO SUMMER SCHOOL PROGRAM for those that are struggling or need additional support to grasp the concepts and move forward. IF YOUR CHILD ISN'T A NATURAL STUDENT Run for the Hills and get your child into a new school (district) and save them from all the frustration and aggravation.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 11, 2012

very disappointing first able principle lack of commitment and leadership assistant principle is the only one that take action. teachers has lack of methodology , no encouragement to do more if they can, academics not challenging enough too easy when it comes to homework teachers usually let students do homework in the study hall and students take that place as fun area teachers are there and do not care lack of commitment when it comes to productive time academically and basic discipline dressing code is very inappropriate, bathroom are disgusting, very poor cooling system teachers and students are dieing from heat they have to share the portable fun oh my gosh? how can this happen to this area.i can from another state there from the greeter area was what you call really technology, sparkle shine professional and efficient management in an overall way what a different? here you have to register with paper and pencil poor technology system in an area where taxes are expensive with that kind of education ridiculous i had to withdrawal my girl to look a better place where she can really learn and get encouragement, challenging academically less than mediocre is my rating
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 24, 2011

The teachers are extremely unfair. They don't test in an objective way. Grading is not based on academic accomplishment so much as whether the child does homework and hands in pieces of paper unrelated to anything actually academic. My daughter is exceptional at Math - three years advanced - and is only getting a B+. Unfairness is key here and grading is ridiculous. And the students receive no encouragement to do more if they can. Less than mediocre is my rating.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 17, 2011

The teachers and academics are outstanding. The students learn very well and the teachers are great. The school itself is average, not very cleanly in places such as the bathroom or gym mats. The way the school handles misbehavior and problems seem to be unfair from what I hear from others. Some kids get suspended for saying insults, while others walk away free for other worse things. Other than that my kids loved attending here and are now in high school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 31, 2011

Good teachers and academics, school bathrooms are disgusting, it gets very hot and students like like they are dieing from the heat. Bad justice system for children who get in trouble. Over all it's ok.


Posted June 27, 2007

after school clubs are without a bus home no after care offered for working parents of middle school kids kids walking home who live with in a mile. No security at back gate.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 12, 2006

The academic programs at Great Hollow are outstanding! When we first moved here that was the most notable improvement, my kids scored much better on the NYS Assessment tests. Parental involvement is welcomed and encouraged here. The chorus and orchestra performances are always exceptional.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 30% in 2013.

335 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
81%
Math

The state average for Math was 30% in 2013.

335 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
86%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 31% in 2013.

308 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
67%
Math

The state average for Math was 27% in 2013.

308 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
87%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 33% in 2013.

357 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
74%
Math

The state average for Math was 27% in 2013.

355 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
82%
Science

The state average for Science was 69% in 2013.

273 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
93%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students50%
Female53%
Male47%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic40%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White49%
Economically disadvantaged21%
Not economically disadvantaged53%
Students with disabilities10%
General population56%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant50%

Math

All Students47%
Female47%
Male46%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic46%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White45%
Economically disadvantaged29%
Not economically disadvantaged49%
Students with disabilities7%
General population53%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant47%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students53%
Female58%
Male46%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander85%
Hispanic34%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White52%
Economically disadvantaged43%
Not economically disadvantaged53%
Students with disabilities6%
General population60%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant53%

Math

All Students52%
Female55%
Male47%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander94%
Hispanic39%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White51%
Economically disadvantaged43%
Not economically disadvantaged52%
Students with disabilities6%
General population59%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant52%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students52%
Female58%
Male46%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander70%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White51%
Economically disadvantaged20%
Not economically disadvantaged54%
Students with disabilities5%
General population58%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant52%

Math

All Students53%
Female52%
Male53%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islander80%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White51%
Economically disadvantaged25%
Not economically disadvantaged55%
Students with disabilities11%
General population57%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant53%

Science

All Students95%
Female94%
Male95%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic86%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White95%
Economically disadvantaged82%
Not economically disadvantaged95%
Students with disabilities73%
General population98%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant95%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 2 88% 48%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 1 5% 9%
Hispanic 2 4% 23%
Black 1 1% 19%
Two or more races 2 1% 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1 0% 1%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Limited English proficient 11%N/A8%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 16%N/A43%
Source: 1 NYSED, 2011-2012
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Fewer than 3 years experience 0%N/A5%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree and above 66%N/A39%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012

Teacher credentials

  This school District averageState average
Teachers with no valid teaching certificate 0%N/A0%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012

This school has not yet provided program information.


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150 Southern Blvd
Nesconset, NY 11767
Phone: (631) 382-2805

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