Advertisement
Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

Ps 46 Arthur Tappan

Public | PK-8 & ungraded | 826 students

 

Be sure to visit

Take along one of
our checklists:

 
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

16 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted August 13, 2014

As a new Parent and A concerned Parent w/ a kindergarten child in a CTT class on the general ed side. I would like to point out the problem is not soo much the Teachers as it is the PRINCIPAL!!!! HE HAS NO CLUE! And I say this with such asurance. As he tried to do damage in a public matter. and IT didn't work and now I am forced to take matters into my own hands. Furthermore, The school needs more security and cameras, BULLYING IS EXCESSIVE THE PRINCIPAL COULD CARE LESS ABOUT YOUR KIDS!!! PLEASE!! Let's say it show it is he is intimadating his teachers under the table and behind close doors... HE tried it with me. I KNOW THE LAW DON'T EVER GO THERE AGAIN!! I's sad that most parents are uneducated and do not have a clue to what they can do to take down some one from a position.. It's called a pen a computer a petition and a mouth. Don't be intimidated. If You see something say something. Don't wait until it's too late.. I understand these teachers positions and the student's safety concerns. A concerned parent.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 11, 2013

My daughter has been attending PS 46 since the first grade. Every year she has been promoted to a TAG (talented and gifted) class. She is smart and I thought that all was well. However, this summer she asked to go to another school. When asked why, she replied that there is too much drama. Children are talking back to the teacher, picking on each other or fighting. My daughter is going to a 5th grade TAG class this September. It will be her last year at the school. I like the principal. I feel that he is concerned. I have spoken with teachers and they appear concerned. However, my daughter has complained about a particular teacher's behavior. My opinion, the students are the problem. -Concerned Parent
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 19, 2013

in 21 years and having 4 children in the nyc school system. i have NEVER came across such a discusting school!!! its so obvious by the way the teachers speak to the students that they are not qulified to deal with children...a certificate proofing they passed the teachers course does not matter!! The horrible teachers at this school should get send back to school for more education on how to deal with children (HORRIBLE) the way they speak and act with these kids is incrediable. Try complaining to the principal Mr. Young and know that absolutely NOTHING will be done!!! Go ahead call the school GOOD LUCK if they even bother to pick up!! I do not go over there because i will most definitley end up lowering my standards to this one specific teacher and taking matters into my own hands!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 6, 2012

My personal review is that most of this parents that are given negative review of this school should volunteer and help this teachers at least for a day and see what is wrong. And remember noone is perfect and we all deserve another chance in life. Instead of critisize the school they should of being part of it together with your child and make it successful. I love the principal and the efforts these teachers make to help our children and until now I have not have any dissappointment yet. I have two children at this school and is great to me, we just have to help the school improve.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 13, 2009

Our kids are among the most creative in the USA! We achieve in the arts as well as the academics, and recently received an 'A' from the Mayor!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 13, 2009

PS 46 has wonderful, talented, and dedicated teachers who go above and beyond to ensure their students succeed.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted September 3, 2009

I think this school is great my girl and boy is very successful in this school I love it my child goes there and was successful to graduate from 6th grade to FDA and my boy is still in there and has recive good classes. The principle is a GREAT principle he is a good principle unlike the other schools
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 2, 2008

This school is a horrible environment to learn in. Students have no structured free play they just run around on empty courtyard with no equipment pushing each other. In gym they watch tv. TOO many discipline problems. Good students are overlooked because staff needs to deal with other issues. If you can send your child to another school. This school only warehouses students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 16, 2007

As a mother of a young and vibrant 10 yr old girl i found this school to be a horrible learning environment. The staff I found to be unhelpful and incompetent!!! They had no regard to students feelings nor their parents. I found parent teach conferences to be generic and unhelpful. My child is a good student and a great team player... Lack of discipline with other children and lack of student activities and groups as far as extra curricular is concerned are consistent and highly needs in this school. The teachers along with office staff should be more knowledgeable and concerned with the students and the parents. Good schools are hard to find understand .... However there should be a medium where students get the attention they need to excel in the future
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 27, 2007

I think this school could be a great, they need teachers that act like teachers. Its good to be cool to kids, but the kids need to see a teacher not a friend. Most of the teachers look young and a little into themselves. I think they could worry about teaching more instead they are teaching fashion. Tring to explain uniforms to my child is hard enough.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 11, 2007

I think school need to work more in activities for the kids, just a few good teacher, not discipline, and most important for me I do not consider school safe enough.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 20, 2006

Awful. There are a few key good teachers, but overall the school is horrible a terrible environment for children. There are no real extracurricular activities, there is basically no physical education or art or music program. THe general attitude of the teachers are They DO Not Care. please get your kids in a better environment, I did and My children thrived.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 26, 2005

There are good teachers and this year the PA has done many things for parents and student. There is still somethings that need to be addressed but, overall is a good school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 21, 2004

There are a few good teachers in this school.I had two children graduate and two are still attending.Although the extra-activities are very limited, the school does o.k.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 3, 2004

I think that this school is great. Since I am a previous student, I cannot complain. The parent involvement is crazy. There has never been a complaint in that category.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 6, 2003

I attended Ps. 46 years ago in the 5th grade so I am proud that my children and grandchildren are attending , but there are a lot of things that need to change like the parents need to get more involved with the childrens education. We need to have an afterschool program for the kids not only the older ones but also the little ones they need help to. I think if we can help our kids in the lower grades they wouldnt need as much in the higher grade. Hopefully this new Department of Education will provide more for our children.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 31% in 2013.

96 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
17%

2012

 
 
34%

2011

 
 
24%
Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

97 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
9%

2012

 
 
33%

2011

 
 
28%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 30% in 2013.

89 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
16%

2012

 
 
42%

2011

 
 
46%
Math

The state average for Math was 36% in 2013.

90 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
22%

2012

 
 
34%

2011

 
 
51%
Science

The state average for Science was 90% in 2013.

88 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
78%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 31% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
8%

2012

 
 
35%

2011

 
 
37%
Math

The state average for Math was 30% in 2013.

76 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
7%

2012

 
 
48%

2011

 
 
38%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 30% in 2013.

85 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
6%

2012

 
 
28%

2011

 
 
30%
Math

The state average for Math was 30% in 2013.

86 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
13%

2012

 
 
37%

2011

 
 
43%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 31% in 2013.

85 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
9%

2012

 
 
15%

2011

 
 
13%
Math

The state average for Math was 27% in 2013.

88 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
8%

2012

 
 
19%

2011

 
 
20%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 33% in 2013.

69 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
18%

2012

 
 
8%

2011

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 27% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
18%

2012

 
 
36%

2011

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 69% in 2013.

67 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students17%
Female20%
Male13%
African American18%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged15%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities0%
General population20%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English17%
Non-migrant17%

Math

All Students9%
Female9%
Male10%
African American13%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged9%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities6%
General population10%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English10%
Non-migrant9%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students16%
Female21%
Male13%
African American17%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities0%
General population19%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English19%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant16%

Math

All Students22%
Female20%
Male24%
African American24%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged22%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities0%
General population25%
English language learners0%
Proficient in English25%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant22%

Science

All Students63%
Female74%
Male52%
African American56%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged64%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities30%
General population67%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English65%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant63%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students8%
Female10%
Male6%
African American2%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities0%
General population10%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English9%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant8%

Math

All Students7%
Female0%
Male14%
African American5%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities7%
General population7%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English7%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant7%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students6%
Female7%
Male5%
African American2%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged4%
Not economically disadvantaged20%
Students with disabilities0%
General population8%
English language learners0%
Proficient in English7%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant6%

Math

All Students13%
Female10%
Male18%
African American11%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged14%
Not economically disadvantaged20%
Students with disabilities0%
General population17%
English language learners0%
Proficient in English17%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant13%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students9%
Female11%
Male8%
African American5%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic13%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities0%
General population11%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English10%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant9%

Math

All Students8%
Female6%
Male10%
African American5%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic10%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities0%
General population9%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English9%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant8%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

English Language Arts

All Students18%
Female15%
Male22%
African American20%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged20%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities0%
General population22%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English22%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant18%

Math

All Students18%
Female24%
Male13%
African American21%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged20%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities0%
General population20%
English language learners0%
Proficient in English21%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant18%

Science

All Students46%
Female45%
Male48%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic53%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged49%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities10%
General population52%
English language learners8%
Proficient in English55%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant46%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year, the New York State Department of Instruction implemented new assessments designed to be aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The new standards for proficiency in these subjects are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change. See this letter from New York's Commissioner of Education for more information on these changes.

In 2012-2013 New York used the New York State Assessments to test students in grades 3 through 8 in English language arts and math, and in grades 4 and 8 in Science. The tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of New York. The goal is for 90% of students to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the New York Department of Education. If there are fewer than 5 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: New York State Education Department

In 2009-2010, this school was given a grade of "C" for the elementary school level.

About the tests


Progress Report Grades measure the school's contribution to student learning in three areas: School Environment, Student Performance and Student Progress. Schools can receive additional credit for achieving exemplary performance progress among high-needs students. Progress Report Grades range from A to F.

Source: New York City Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 1 50% 19%
Hispanic 1 47% 23%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 2 1% 9%
White 2 1% 48%
American Indian/Alaska Native 2 0% 1%
Two or more races 1 0% 1%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Limited English proficient 212%N/A8%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 199%N/A43%
Source: 1 NYSED, 2011-2012
Source: 2 NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Fewer than 3 years experience 12%N/A5%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012

Teacher education levels

  This school District averageState average
Master's degree and above 44%N/A39%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012

Teacher credentials

  This school District averageState average
Teachers with no valid teaching certificate 0%N/A0%
Source: NYSED, 2011-2012
The NYC Department of Education asked parents, teachers and students about their school's learning environment. Results provide insight into school climate, such as whether the school is academically rigorous, safe, communicative and collaborative. Learn more

The information captured by the survey is designed to support a dialogue among all members of the school community about how to make the school a better place to learn. An overall category score is calculated for each respondent group (parents, teachers, or students) by averaging the scores of the questions within that survey category.

Category scores for each of the respondent groups are then combined to form overall category scores. Alongside the results for each school are the aggregated results across all NYC public schools, which are provided as a basis for comparisons.

Learn more about the NYC DOE survey »Close
Based on 722 responses

This school provides ... 1

A safe and respectful environmentWhat's this?

This score measures whether parents, students and teachers feel that the school creates a physically and emotionally secure environment in which everyone can focus on student learning.

Close
 
This school
7.5
out of 10
 
City average
8.0
out of 10
 

Parents

This school

 
8.3
 

City average

 
8.4
 

Students

This school

 
6.9
 

City average

 
7.2
 

Teachers

This school

 
7.4
 

City average

 
8.0
 
Clear, useful communication about educational goalsWhat's this?

This score measures whether parents, students and teachers feel that the school provides information about the school's educational goals and offers appropriate feedback on each student's learning outcome.

Close
 
This school
8.2
out of 10
 
City average
8.1
out of 10
 

Parents

This school

 
8.5
 

City average

 
8.5
 

Students

This school

 
8.1
 

City average

 
7.8
 

Teachers

This school

 
8.0
 

City average

 
7.8
 
Strong parent, teacher and student engagementWhat's this?

This score measures how engaged parents, students and teachers feel they are in an active and vibrant partnership to promote student learning.

Close
 
This school
7.8
out of 10
 
City average
7.8
out of 10
 

Parents

This school

 
8.3
 

City average

 
8.1
 

Students

This school

 
7.4
 

City average

 
7.2
 

Teachers

This school

 
7.6
 

City average

 
7.8
 
High academic expectations for all studentsWhat's this?

This score measures how well parents, students and teachers feel that the school develops rigorous and meaningful academic goals that encourage students to do their best.

Close
 
This school
8.2
out of 10
 
City average
8.2
out of 10
 

Parents

This school

 
8.4
 

City average

 
8.3
 

Students

This school

 
8.5
 

City average

 
8.1
 

Teachers

This school

 
7.7
 

City average

 
8.1
 

Based on surveys from:

 RespondentsResponse rate
Parents46372%
Students20887%
Teachers5188%

12012-2013 New York City Department of Education School Survey

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • MR. GEORGE YOUNG

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events found for this school
Searching for school events...
Date
Title
  • {{date}}
    {{title}}
Export calendar
Outlook.com
Microsoft Outlook
iCal Format
Google Calendar
Print Calendar
Uploading, please wait...
POWERED BY
Tandem

Apply

To learn more about enrolling, please call the school.
 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

2987 Frederick Douglas Blvd
New York, NY 10039
Phone: (212) 690-5911

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools







ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT