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Mountain Discovery Charter School

Charter | K-8 | 169 students

 

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Living in Bryson City

Situated in a small town neighborhood. The median home value is $110,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $652.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 3 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

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15 reviews of this school


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Posted June 28, 2013

Awful. Like the other reviewer, kindergarten is the only good grade. After taking concerns to the director I was greeted with hostility and defensiveness, and somehow the problem became my fault. It's like an alternative school for special needs kids. Jackson County schools are so much better and my kid is thriving.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 14, 2013

This school has serious problems!!! The Middle School faculty are dysfunctional and incompetent. My child was treated poorly and the Director blamed him for mot being able to learn. Everything is all hunky dory until you have a problem. Then they gang up on you. We are so sorry we wasted a year of our life listening to the hype.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 28, 2013

MDCS is a wonderful school. I could go on forever. Visit mountaindiscovery.org to learn everything you need to know anout this great school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 19, 2012

MDCS is and extraordinary school that provides an outstanding educational experience! We are confident that our children are being prepared, academically and socially, to succeed in high school and beyond. The experienced and highly qualified staff cater to the individual needs of each student. Experiential learning abounds at this school! The director is fair and impartial, diplomatic and easy to approach. All decisions made are done so with the well being of every student in mind. In the 8 years we have been at this school, we have never felt that our safety was in jeopardy. If school has remained open during winter weather conditions, it has always been communicated to families that students should be kept home if driving conditions are unsafe. Families have always been told that absences in such a case are excused. We truly believe that MDCS has gotten better each year that it's been in operation and look forward to the future!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 19, 2012

I am a very proud MDCS parent and have two sons who have attended here for 4 1/2 years. I appreciate the diversity and the unique experiential learning that is displayed in each class. The teachers and staff here are excellent and committed to their students. We feel honored to have the choice to send our children here and we know that when they leave they will have a quality education behind them.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 18, 2012

Kindergarten is great! After that it goes down hill fast. The teachers are condescending, Especially the 4th grade. She has no problem cutting off your conversation when you are not saying what she wants to hear. Our son has been going here for 4 1/2 years and we will be taking him out in the middle of the school year because it has gotten so bad. She shows favoritism to her daughter who is in her class this year. There is very little experiential learning, that we were looking forward to and is the reason we started our son's education here. The principal has no clue as to safe conditions during the winter. When other schools in the area are closed due to weather he will have the school remain open at risk of student safety. We are very disappointed with how the school is turning out. Each year we had hoped things would get better, but it seems to be going the other way and we will not subject our son to inferior education and teachers.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 6, 2011

My children really love this school and are enjoying learning. Small school environment gives chance for individualized attention. We are very satisfied with our choice of school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 3, 2011

MDCS is a school with a lot of great energy. The kids feel comfortable being individuals, not feeling a need to fit any mold and I attribute this to the dedication of the parents and teachers to foster confidence and individualism. The teachers have passion and truly care about the education and well being of each child. About the administration I would say the same. Despite having to deal with adversity they have not lost site of what matters most - our children learning to thrive in this world. Thank you to the entire faculty and community of MDCS. I am SO THANKFUL that this is where my daughter is getting her education!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 31, 2010

My kid adores this school and all the staff! When she was having trouble with math, her teacher privately tutored her after school, catching her skills up to the rest of the class. The school staff seems like a family, and function well under the current principal. He is a down-to-earth, approachable guy who has responded to all my questions, comments, and concerns in a great way. Love it!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 31, 2010

I have 2 children at MDCS and am an involved parent. This school is wonderful. Staff do a great job of focusing on the students and individualizing instruction. Fun, expeditionary style of teaching and learning. We love "Expedition Nights" when kids show off their projects. It is almost like a private school without the fee!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 9, 2010

Stay Away! This place has gone way downhill under the direction of the current Director and Board. No curriculum oversight. Irrelevant field trips. Teachers quality varies from good to pathetic. I would go ANYWHERE else for a better education for my children
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 28, 2010

In the past, MDCS has been an excellent school. However, the school is now run by a rogue director and board bent on agendas that are hurting students and risking the livelihoods of several excellent teachers and staff members. Many parents have pulled their children out in the past several months; as NC's Department of Public Instruction is now involved, many more will follow in short order. The destruction of such a fine school and family community has been exceptionally painful to experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 24, 2010

Poor administration trickles down. Worse than public school on many levels: curriculum, behavior management, no nurse or cafeteria, high student turnover. The school Board has raised no capital funds for permanent building in years. Still teaching in modular buildings. I can not recommend this school. My child will not be attending next year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 3, 2009

small classes, experiential learning
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 24, 2008

My girls love this school! They jump out of bed in the morning, ready and eager to go. The teachers are wonderful, staff is VERY friendly, and all the kids seem so happy. It is a blessing to have such a fine school in our area. Keep up the good work!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

16 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
83%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

16 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

20 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
40%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
83%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

20 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

19 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
89%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

19 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
94%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

19 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
83%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

20 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

20 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
90%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

19 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
74%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

19 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
68%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

19 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
82%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

19 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
73%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

19 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students44%
Femalen/a
Male40%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White46%
Economically disadvantaged36%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students58%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English44%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant44%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students56%
Femalen/a
Male60%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White64%
Economically disadvantaged55%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students67%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English56%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant56%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students40%
Femalen/a
Male33%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White41%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged57%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students50%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English40%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant40%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students60%
Femalen/a
Male60%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White59%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students75%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English60%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant60%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students58%
Female70%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White67%
Economically disadvantaged55%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students65%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English58%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant58%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students42%
Female50%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White33%
Economically disadvantaged27%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students47%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English42%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant42%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students53%
Female50%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White53%
Economically disadvantaged27%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students59%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English53%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant53%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students60%
Femalen/a
Male53%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged54%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students73%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English60%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant60%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students55%
Femalen/a
Male53%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White56%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged46%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students60%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English55%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant55%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students79%
Femalen/a
Male91%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White75%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged91%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students87%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English79%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant79%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students90%
Femalen/a
Male-95%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White88%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged91%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students93%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English90%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant90%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students63%
Female60%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White62%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged55%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students69%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English63%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant63%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students79%
Female80%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged73%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students88%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English79%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant79%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students90%
Female90%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White85%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged82%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students94%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English90%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant90%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 81% 52%
American Indian 6% 1%
Two or more races 6% 4%
Hispanic 4% 14%
Asian 2% 3%
Black 1% 26%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr Carter Petty
Fax number
  • (828) 488-0526

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

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890 North Jenkins Branch Road
Bryson City, NC 28713
Website: Click here
Phone: (828) 488-1222

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Grace Christian Academy
Bryson City, NC


Grace Christian Academy
Bryson City, NC






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