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Woods Charter

Charter | K-12 | 501 students

 

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Living in Chapel Hill

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $303,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $870.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

5 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 7 ratings
2013:
Based on 6 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
No new ratings

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28 reviews of this school


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Posted March 21, 2014

This school is amazing and has a great leader this year. Cannot be happier!!! My kids are thriving in all aspects.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 21, 2014

This school is an amazing place. We've been part of this school for ten years and been through 5 principals and I think Mr. Bryan is shaping up to be one of the best to date. I have two children in attendance and one who has graduated and I don't think I could drag my kids back to traditional public school. No single place can perfectly suit all people but this comes as close as it gets.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 20, 2014

I cannot imagine a better place for a kid to grow up. This is a school that really cares about my kids and pushes them to be their best. The teachers are a dedicated group, and the new principal has provided phenomenal leadership. We have been with the school for a long time and are excited that the current principal is finally head of the school. We are grateful for Woods!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 20, 2014

I have been a member of the Woods community for more than 10 years. The new principal has not reversed or undermined any work done by parents over the years. On the contrary, he is revitalizing and re-energizing the staff and community. My children have thrived at Woods and I am grateful that I found the school when it was still in the strip mall! There was no wait list because most people cared more about the facilities than the wonderful people inside. Those of us who looked beyond were rewarded with an excellent educational institution and a fantastic group of teachers who care about each individual child. I have no doubt that under the leadership of Mr Bryan, Woods will put down strong roots in the building and community which will benefit youngsters for years to come!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 17, 2014

I have a response to the person who wrote "New principle in his 1st year is not capable,". First I note this person did not say if he/she is a parent of one of our students, a student or a staff/teacher. Second it would be interesting to know how many years this person has been involved and volunteered at Woods. Third this person needs to spell principal correctly. I have full confidence in the principal and he has worked diligently for several years to help Woods. If this person has some positive recommendations to make I am sure the principal would be willing to listen. Grandparent to student at Woods for seven years. Lastly, if you don't like the school or the principal, there are other schools available.


Posted March 17, 2014

Sending my two children to Woods is the best choice I have made in regards to their education. Really happy with the new principal and the kids love him. I do wish more parents would volunteer because it seems like it is the same group of great people, but I would love to meet more families.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 16, 2014

New principle in his 1st year is not capable, and a very poor choice for this role. It has been very sad to see how quickly years of work by parents can be reversed and undermined. The ratings posted from previous years just simply are no longer the present situation.


Posted November 21, 2013

Great facility and community... Secure environment and feels like home.. Excellent academics and small class sizes. Very good parent involvement. Most importantly kids are happy!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 26, 2013

We are entering our 5th year as part of the Woods community and it has been nothing but a positive experience. My two kids are thriving with the small class sizes and phenomenal teachers. The new administration is committed to taking WCS to an even higher level of excellence - it is simply a great school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 24, 2013

My 2 grandchildren attend Woods Charter--one for 10 years and one for 7 years. For them there is no other school. From the principal to the teachers to the office staff the school works to help each student. The office personnel know the children by name and are so good when a student comes to the office sick or a fall at recess. We do have to stretch our dollars because the taxpayers do not pay for our building, buses or desks, etc. Woods is great because of all the hours our volunteers put in from working in the lunchroom to spreading mulch to helping in classrooms. We work together; that is why Woods is great.


Posted September 24, 2013

We absolutely love Woods. Our son is in first grade and is thriving. The teachers, administrators and parents are passionate, engaged and involved. The small class size fosters a sense of community and enables each and every learner to grow and develop. If your family is fortunate enough to win the "Woods Education Lottery," you will not be disappointed (!).
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 23, 2013

We are new to the school with out child entering kindergarten. It is early in the year, but we've had a great experience so far. We feel the teachers are great, the administration engaged and the parental involvement outstanding.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 20, 2013

Woods charter is an AMAZING school it has very supportive teachers and the students there are really cool. I absolutely love going there I will be a sophomore in 2014 and have never been to a better school ever before.


Posted March 5, 2012

I'm surprised Great Schools only rates Woods Charter 9 out of 10. I've had kids in two Chapel Hill elementary schools, and switched to Woods Chartered to help our kids get a better education. Teachers like Ms. Green, just to name one of many outstanding teachers, made a real difference in my daughter's life. Woods does have to do more with less money, which may help explain the 9 rating, but the people involved in making everything work out are outstanding. The single biggest problem at Woods is the painful lottery to get in. I hope with the recent change in NC law, more great schools like Woods Charter can be created.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 13, 2010

This is my daughter's 3rd year in the high school at Woods. We've been very happy with the school. Although before 9th grade she'd been begging to attend the big high school to which we were districted, we wanted the small school experience for her. Two weeks after starting she said 'Mom, I'm so glad you sent me to Woods - it's like going to my other family.'
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 4, 2010

This is our 4th year at Woods. We have children in elementary, middle and high school here. All have done very well. The teachers are very accessible and always willing to give help when needed to every student. Since it is a small school everyone gets to know everyone so you feel comfortable about who you child is hanging out with. Parents are very involved and it shows in all the activities offered at Woods
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2009

The small classes, personalized attention, and the enthusiasm of the instructors.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2009

The teachers are committed to ensuring that every student is successful. The classes are interesting and engaging. All learning styles are accommodated. The students and teachers don't leave anyone out. Teachers are responsive to parents. My kid tells me every day how much she loves her school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 6, 2009

I can't say enough good things about this school. My son is medically and developmentally disabled and Woods has done everything he needs to help him. They worked with us way above and beyond what our base school would do. Because of their support, my son has caught up with his peers and no longer needs extra services. I can't say enough good things about this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2008

After having taught in public schools in Virginia and North Carolina, I left teaching altogether. I was disenchanted with the general idea of teaching after all I had seen at the public schools. A friend let me know of an opening at Woods, and I have never been so happy in my life. The administration here is wonderful, the faculty are superb, the parents are involved and supportive at the same time, and everyone who is here every single day seems genuinely happy to be at school. The facility is wonderful!
—Submitted by a teacher


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

32 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

32 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

32 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

32 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

40 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
88%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

40 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
90%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

40 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
90%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

40 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

40 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

40 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

40 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
93%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

39 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
88%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

39 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
83%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

39 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
90%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Writing

The state average for Writing was 70% in 2011.

43 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
79%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students91%
Female92%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White-95%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students93%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English91%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant91%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students88%
Female-95%
Male80%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White92%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged87%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students89%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English88%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant88%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students72%
Female65%
Male80%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White71%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged73%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students79%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English72%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant72%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students66%
Female71%
Male60%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White68%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged63%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students75%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English66%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant66%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students68%
Female67%
Male68%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White70%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students79%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English68%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant68%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students68%
Female72%
Male64%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White70%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students77%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English68%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant68%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students80%
Female83%
Male77%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White84%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged80%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students88%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English80%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant80%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students75%
Female78%
Male73%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White74%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged74%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students77%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English75%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant75%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students88%
Female89%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged87%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students89%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English88%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant88%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students73%
Female79%
Male63%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White78%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students76%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English73%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant73%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students73%
Female75%
Male69%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White78%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged71%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students76%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English73%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant73%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students64%
Female57%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White67%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged66%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students72%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English64%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant64%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students74%
Female71%
Male78%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students81%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English74%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant74%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students95%
Female-95%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White-95%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged95%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students-95%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English95%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant95%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

49 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
90%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

48 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

45 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 82% in 2011.

45 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
93%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 83% in 2012.

44 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
89%
Civics and Economics

The state average for Civics and Economics was 80% in 2011.

42 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
>95%
English I

The state average for English I was 83% in 2012.

44 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Physical Science

The state average for Physical Science was 77% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
United States History

The state average for United States History was 82% in 2011.

45 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
91%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students69%
Female62%
Male78%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White71%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged69%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students74%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English69%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant69%
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Students81%
Female78%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged80%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students84%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English81%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant81%
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Students87%
Female79%
Male-95%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White92%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged87%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students92%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English87%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant87%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 85% 52%
Black 5% 26%
Hispanic 4% 14%
Two or more races 4% 4%
American Indian 1% 1%
Asian 1% 3%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

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Awards

Academic awards received in the past 3 years
  • 5th in North Carolina for SAT scores 2005-2006 (2006)
  • 93% graduation rate (2006)
  • NC School of Distinction or Excellence past 4 years (2006)

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • French
  • Spanish
School leaders can update this information here.

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School basics

School start time
  • 8.30am
School end time
  • 3.00pm
Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
School Leader's name
  • Mr Cotton Bryan
Fax number
  • (919) 960-0133

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • French
  • Spanish
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Dress Code
  • Neither uniforms nor dress code
School leaders can update this information here.

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160 Woodland Grove Lane
Chapel Hill, NC 27516
Website: Click here
Phone: (919) 960-8353

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