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GreatSchools Rating

Grey Culbreth Middle School

Public | 6-8 | 685 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 4 ratings

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14 reviews of this school


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Posted March 23, 2014

We have been at Culbreth for the past two and a half years, and our daughter will finish eighth grade soon. While middle school is arguably the harder years for students, our daughter has scored very highly in outside programs, via Duke TIPS, for example, taking her ACT in seventh grade and scoring in the 90th percentile among HS students. The teachers do their best, but high turnover and continued cuts to the system have made this school suffer. We appreciate the overworked gifted specialists and teachers most, but some teachers are not as good as others, and the principal is the worst I have ever known. There is more emphasis on sports than academic teams by the principal, and little creative thought as to how to leverage the many benefits we have living so close to major universities. Would have chosen Phillips if we had to do it over, but all the schools are suffering now.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 28, 2013

Principal is horrible! Discipline and student safety issues are handled by administrative interns instead of principal!


Posted September 27, 2011

New Principal, even better experience, with good communication and caring for kids. The principal now is focused on the kids (has one in the school) and is a beloved staff member from the local high school. It's early in the year and we're already feeling welcomed. We had a great experience over the last 2 years, and with 2 kids at the school now are loving the teachers, the teams, the athletics, and the whole experience!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 19, 2011

THIS PRINCIPAL IS HORRIBLE THE PATHFINDERS ARE NOT ALLOWED TO RUN AND PLAY AT PA ALL WE CAN DO IS WALK AROUND THE TRACK WE ARE NOT ALLOWED TO HIGH FIVE OR W WILL GET ISS


Posted January 29, 2011

I think that the teachers go above and beyond, but the principal only seems to care about the Ipods. They currently have a drug problem at the school, fighting, and steeling. It seems to take the student 4 or 5 times of bad behavior before something is done and then it is only 1 or 2 days of ISS.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 27, 2011

it is the best school i know in the south. And the teachers are wonderful they work one one with the students.


Posted August 27, 2010

The principal is terrible. She is not interested in communicating with parents, changes policies without notice, and doesn't make any attempt to know the kids. She micro-manages everything, which makes more sense to me now that I have learned that she was promoted to this position after being principal of an elementary school. The guidance staff, at least for my child's grade, is terrible. The counselor doesn't know the kids, doesn't have any interest in the kids, and like the principal, seems to take any request to change something about a child's schedule as a personal attack. The school also asks kids and parents to fill out electives preference forms that list courses that are no longer offered.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 2, 2010

I agree with the principal comment she is terrible she doesn't let my daughter hug her friends and she locked the library a couple years ago when it got to full in the morning
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 2, 2010

I also agree with the principal comment. Ms. Wells shows that she is incapable of listening to other's ideas, and my son says that she frequently makes little things into big problems. She yells at my son every day when his bus is late, and refuses to listen when he informs her that he had nothing to do with it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 13, 2010

This is an Excellent School, I enjoy how Culbreth continueously tends to embrace the future.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 7, 2009

Excellent school, very good teachers, wonderful equipments. Absolutely incredible to think it's... free.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 12, 2009

This school is great, my kid loves it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 15, 2007

Culbreth has a longtime reputation as a great school, but the new principal has been terrible to work with. In meetings, we have found her to be a very poor listener, interrupting frequently and attempting to 'bulldoze' people. The teacher morale seems a lot lower this year, and we are concerned that good teachers will leave until her contract is up.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 31, 2007

I think that culbreth is my favorite. it has great teachers, principle and a great learning environment. I think culbreth should have a 10 out of 10
—Submitted by a student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

217 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
89%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

217 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
88%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

229 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
93%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

228 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

227 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
93%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

227 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
90%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

227 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
88%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students61%
Female62%
Male61%
Black15%
Asian56%
Hispanic29%
Multiracial65%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White79%
Economically disadvantaged17%
Not economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilities20%
Non-disabled students66%
Limited English proficiency23%
Proficient in English64%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant61%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students68%
Female71%
Male65%
Black30%
Asian50%
Hispanic36%
Multiracial71%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White85%
Economically disadvantaged25%
Not economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disabilities10%
Non-disabled students74%
Limited English proficiency8%
Proficient in English72%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant68%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students61%
Female62%
Male60%
Black19%
Asian65%
Hispanic26%
Multiracial57%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White76%
Economically disadvantaged19%
Not economically disadvantaged75%
Students with disabilities13%
Non-disabled students66%
Limited English proficiency36%
Proficient in English62%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant61%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students66%
Female71%
Male62%
Black25%
Asian59%
Hispanic44%
Multiracial64%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Economically disadvantaged21%
Not economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilities17%
Non-disabled students72%
Limited English proficiency23%
Proficient in English69%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant66%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students57%
Female66%
Male50%
Black18%
Asian48%
Hispanic30%
Multiracial58%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White71%
Economically disadvantaged20%
Not economically disadvantaged69%
Students with disabilities8%
Non-disabled students63%
Limited English proficiency17%
Proficient in English60%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant57%
Academically gifted94%

Reading

All Students68%
Female74%
Male63%
Black11%
Asian48%
Hispanic39%
Multiracial84%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White85%
Economically disadvantaged20%
Not economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disabilities21%
Non-disabled students73%
Limited English proficiency22%
Proficient in English72%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant68%
Academically gifted-95%

Science

All Students82%
Female84%
Male81%
Black36%
Asian57%
Hispanic74%
Multiracial90%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White-95%
Economically disadvantaged46%
Not economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disabilities46%
Non-disabled students87%
Limited English proficiency33%
Proficient in English87%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant82%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

173 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students73%
Female76%
Male72%
Black29%
Asian75%
Hispanic58%
Multiracial80%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White79%
Economically disadvantaged40%
Not economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students75%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English74%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant73%
Academically gifted-95%

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 59% 52%
Black 14% 26%
Hispanic 11% 14%
Asian 9% 3%
Two or more races 7% 4%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 26%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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225 Culbreth Road
Chapel Hill, NC 27516
Website: Click here
Phone: (919) 929-7161

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