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Northridge Middle

Public | 6-8 | 801 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

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2013:
Based on 3 ratings
2012:
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17 reviews of this school


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Posted October 17, 2013

Mr. Barnes genuinely cares for the staff and student body. He is present and engaging as well as available. The staff care about the students and spend countless hours outside of the bell schedule preparing and teaching students as well as parents. The students feel safe. There is no school that is 100% perfect but perfection is what Northridge Middle School is striving for. I am a proud parent of the Hawks!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 14, 2013

Northridge Middle school has provided my daughter with an excellent education. She has attended for two years and has maintained an A average. This comes with lots of hard work and great teachers. I am immediately informed of her academic progress. I have found the teachers create a nurturing and supportive environment.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 9, 2013

At first, I had my doubts about sending my son to Northridge. However, I have come to know the Teachers, Office Staff, and Principal. They geniually care about the kids and my son has done very well, in honors classes, and on the A/B Honor Roll all year. I would definitely recommend this school to other parents.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 17, 2010

My daughter is on the A/B honor roll at Northridge middle school. This comes with a lot of work and staying in contact with her teachers. Northridge is not a school that you can allow your child to attend without following up with the teachers and staff. This school has made leaps and bounds of progress this past year with a practically whole new staff and front office staff. But you have to become a partner with the school parents I encourage you to get involved through e mail and scheduling regular appointments and staying on top of things we are seeing a totally different child academically this year. God bless the staff at Northridge you are to be commended for the endless support and work you continue to provide toward our children!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 21, 2009

I was not impressed by Northridge. We relocated to Charlotte from NY last July. I put my daughter in Northridge thinking it would be a great school for her. Well, my daughter was on the honor roll in NY and she barely made it out of the 7th grade this year. I am very involved w/ my childs education and i was truly shocked with the lack of involvement from the teachers and the overall school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 29, 2007

I am very disappointed with Northridge. In my opionion, CMS needs to do some clearing out of staff and they should start with the Admin (Principals, Vice principals etc..) up front at Northridge. I have had the pleasure of meeting some great teachers at that school, however, for every 1 great teacher there is 3-4 that should not be there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 9, 2007

I am a student at northridge middle, therefore I know what goes on. I love northridge middle school. The teachers are sometimes therefore boring is heck. The parents are not that involved, but I wouldn't expect them to be since this isn't elementary and the children are gowning up. The security guards are nice, and stuff, but they don't take no crap. Overall Northridge Middle has its pro's and con's, but what school dosen't.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 17, 2007

I have a stepchild that attends this school. Overall, it is okay. I believe their focus should be on the academics, funding and sports last. Education is the key. At this age, if you do not master the basic now, you will not be able to make it in high school. She is struggling now just with the basics. Get the kids up in academic then reward with sports... The need to focus on the basic. If you master the basic,retest and move to AG, AVID, Honors Etc.. Need to improve....
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 16, 2007

I have interacted with several people in several positions at Northridge. I wouldn't say that all or the majority of the people are rude or complacent with education. There are some good and some great teachers at Northridge. The atmosphere, for the most part is professional. However, the leadership is not always leading in a positive way. This year, I had to interact with a principal intern, who was ten times more professional and respectful than the principal of the school. There are many teacher vs. administration issues that arise and are aired. The school clearly has a vision and I feel is working towards it, but its leadership needs improvement in relating to its clients, knowing how to speak to people, and knowing how to treat the staff so its problems do not flow to the community. Overall, the school is satisfactory.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 12, 2007

Northridge has so many problems that I find it hard to pick the worst. The only bright area I have seen would be the guidance counselors. The front office staff are rude on a regular bases, most of the teachers are not teaching a thing. I try to quiz my child on subjects taught he can barely answer some of the questions yet he is on the AB honor roll. I won't even bring up the leadership. I even joined programs to help out and that did not help. This school needs a complete overall. Did you see the 3 out of 10 rating?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 20, 2006

My impression of North Ridge Middle, including the two Principals, Staff, Administrators, and teachers can be summed up in one word. Crappy! The 'positive' reviews listed here on this site, are probably from the Staff/Principals Office, or the Teachers at North Ridge. Would I recommend this school to anyone? uh...Did I mention crappy?!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 23, 2006

My family has relocated to charlotte from NJ.NRM is worse than the most horrible school in NJ. I have never experienced such an unorganized school in my life. After only 3 months of attendence I had to pull my daughter out of the school. She made the honor roll at the school Straight A's, yet could not pass the end of grades. That is unacceptable!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 30, 2004

I think that NRM is a good school. But I also think that they should find a better way to discipline the students because every time I turn around my children that attend that school are telling me that students are constanly getting suspended and its almost time for the EOG's and students need to learn the most they can. Another thing is the teachers. So I would not recomend Northridge Middle to anyone!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 6, 2004

I am a little dismayed that the teachers for the most part have a 'I don't care' attitude, until basically it's too late for the student. The solicitation for parental involvement tends to be in the area of discipline. I feel more attention is needed in the area of academics and implementing alternative learning/teaching techniques and not just for EOG time. I would also appreciate a fair, unbiased evaluation of each student's progress and behavior. I believe the school in conjunction with the parents can create a more student friendly learning environment.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 5, 2003

Hi I am a parent at Northridge Middle and to tell the truth I would not reccomend this school to another parent because NRM doesnt care about the students they care about getting them kicked out and making money off of them and I use to think NRM was good for my child but I now have a change of mind the parents dont stand up for their children and the principal doesnt do much for the school. But I (as a parent) do not like NRM because of the way the act towards our students. Thank you.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted September 10, 2003

I think there are some really great staff members that truly care about students and he security was especially helpful with talking with my child and making him feel comfortable in new environment as a 6th grader. Supportive staff, just sometimes overwhelmed as we all are when dealing with kids. ut overall a good school-parents stay involved-the school can't do it alone!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 10, 2003

Hey, I think that Northridge is a pretty good school but I think that the teachers should have a better communication with the parents insted of the I dont care attitude.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

258 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
22%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
67%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

258 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
30%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
62%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

265 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
26%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
77%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

265 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
34%

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
49%

2010

 
 
57%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

277 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
13%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
81%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

277 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
28%

2012

 
 
54%

2011

 
 
61%

2010

 
 
60%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

277 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
38%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
51%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students22%
Female28%
Male17%
Black14%
Asiann/a
Hispanic32%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White21%
Economically disadvantaged22%
Not economically disadvantaged23%
Students with disabilities9%
Non-disabled students24%
Limited English proficiency10%
Proficient in English23%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant22%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students30%
Female32%
Male29%
Black26%
Asiann/a
Hispanic33%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White29%
Economically disadvantaged29%
Not economically disadvantaged39%
Students with disabilities11%
Non-disabled students33%
Limited English proficiency15%
Proficient in English32%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant30%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students26%
Female27%
Male25%
Black20%
Asiann/a
Hispanic34%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White33%
Economically disadvantaged22%
Not economically disadvantaged40%
Students with disabilities7%
Non-disabled students29%
Limited English proficiency13%
Proficient in English28%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant26%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students34%
Female36%
Male32%
Black34%
Asiann/a
Hispanic27%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White50%
Economically disadvantaged31%
Not economically disadvantaged43%
Students with disabilities7%
Non-disabled students37%
Limited English proficiency-5%
Proficient in English38%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant34%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students13%
Female12%
Male15%
Black9%
Asian23%
Hispanic25%
Multiracial18%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White18%
Economically disadvantaged13%
Not economically disadvantaged13%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students15%
Limited English proficiency-5%
Proficient in English15%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant13%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students28%
Female29%
Male27%
Black23%
Asian31%
Hispanic40%
Multiracial27%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White35%
Economically disadvantaged27%
Not economically disadvantaged32%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students31%
Limited English proficiency18%
Proficient in English29%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant28%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students38%
Female35%
Male41%
Black33%
Asian62%
Hispanic44%
Multiracial64%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White35%
Economically disadvantaged36%
Not economically disadvantaged45%
Students with disabilities6%
Non-disabled students42%
Limited English proficiency29%
Proficient in English39%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant38%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
94%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students72%
Female73%
Male72%
Black60%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged71%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students72%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English72%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant72%
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 62% 26%
Hispanic 26% 14%
White 5% 52%
Asian 4% 3%
Two or more races 3% 4%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 82%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students School social worker/counselors(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school officials and community members.

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Arts & music

Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus

Health & athletics

School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr Raymond Barnes Jr
Associations
  • SACS
Fax number
  • (980) 343-5174

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Football
Girls sports
  • Softball
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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7601 The Plaza
Charlotte, NC 28215
Website: Click here
Phone: (980) 343-5015

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