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Providence High

Public | 9-12 | 1998 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 5 ratings
2013:
Based on 14 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

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50 reviews of this school


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Posted April 3, 2014

This school is fine as long as you start here freshman or sophomore year. Junior year is intense, but if you have been at Providence since freshmen or sophomore year , you will be able to adjust to the workload because it gets gradually harder every year. This school is not as bad as the comments are suggesting. It is actually a great school, which offers many great classes that would not be offered elsewhere. It does have a few issues though: it is not very diverse(at all) and a handful of the teachers are horrible and lazy.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 18, 2014

Providence is a great and challenging school. It's not easy but it is worth it. The teachers and administration are always willing to help and guide my children. There is a TON of extracurricular activities for any student from athletics to fine arts to academics. There are the "normal" high school things that go on but the administration handles any such things immediately, effectively, and fair. It's a good feeling that I always know my children are safe, cared for, and well educated.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 18, 2014

Update: This school epitomizes what is WRONG with the US free public education system. Long story short, my child was pigeon-holed as a low performer, failed twice by a teacher in a subject both his father and I are well versed in teaching on a University level. Our child had self esteem issues stemming from his attendance at this poor institution. Our child was at risk of not graduating from High School. Today, after a new school and some amazing administrators at his new school, our son is not only on the A honor roll, but has been invited to attend 4 prestigious NC Colleges, in addition to an invitation into a nationally recognized honors organization for High School Seniors. Follow your gut when it comes to your children and do not let any so call professional pigeon hole your child's future for ANY reason!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 28, 2014

FINALLY removed my child from this school after 2 years of empty promises and a facade of caring administrators. Been in a new school for 2 semesters and love it. Have a new found faith in education and can't express how much happier and production my child is. If you are considering PHS, words of advice; if your child is naturally a high academic performer you should be OK, the administration caters to these students. In fact they rely on them to pad their performance reviews. However if your child is an average student looking for a nurturing environment or you are looking for a 'family' oriented experience, this is not the place for you.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 3, 2014

I graduated here I'm 2011. If you are even I'm the slightest thinking about putting your child in this school run far! I transferred in my sophomore year and was in the top 10% of my old school. Once I got here I was struggling to maintain B's in my classes. The school only teaches you how to take scantron tests and write and produce a "senior graduation project." Their high "test scores" just come from their training you how to memorize information for a test not understand it or use it. Kids here are the worst and are not friendly at all! If you don't make strighy A's or your parents don't spend a bunch of money your considered mentally disabled in the schools eyes. I went to the school I wanted to get into for college but I still regret going to this school and I have never once returned.


Posted November 23, 2013

We are moving to NC! We need information about neighborhood, bullies, and social life around the area.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 19, 2013

I graduated from Providence High School in 2011 and I never want to go back. The place is straight out of "The Hunger Games." The teachers encourage a cutthroat atmosphere from day one. Students are left to sink or swim in the academic environment with little aid from the staff. Those who are at the top of their class become the "chosen ones" and everyone else is cast away. Many teachers (especially those who teach AP) are extremely unprofessional and see themselves as "college drill sergeants." One has to wonder why they would teach high school instead of college if they're so intelligent, but I'll let you figure that one out for yourself (hint: they're not). One teacher told my parents that students do not earn A's in AP courses because high school students can't get A's in college courses. I am now a junior at a prestigious university, earning my accounting degree and a year away from being commissioned as an officer in the U.S. Army. Needless to say, the stories about certain failure if you didn't have a 4.5 GPA were utter bull. Do not send your child to Providence High School if you want them to receive a good education in a professional and respectful environment.


Posted October 18, 2013

The teachers are awful and do not care about student sucess. THe administators are even worse! The only reason I am giving it one star is beacause I can not give it ZERO!!! They only care about you if you are the top 25 in your class otherwise they consider you dumb. The student population is not diverse and teachers try to make you fail. Please if you are considering schools for your children do NOT send them here they will only fail!
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 9, 2013

I have had children in this school for 6 years. I am so saddened by the culture in this school - which seems designed to take our best and brightest and "wring them out." It is almost as if some of the teachers don't want the students to succeed - they enjoy discouraging and belittling the students. (Of course, there are a few exceptions and a few good teachers.) For the most part, however, the principal and staff care about little other than test scores. Of course, the high test scores in this school are a result of bright students with families who put an emphasis on education. The crime in all of this is that the "B" student (who would be in A student in most schools) is completely neglected - and believe they are incompetent by the time the leave this school. Such a waste as our future needs the contributions of these capable and hard working children - they have much to offer. The administration NEEDS to step up and take responsibility for nurturing and truly educating our children during these important developmental years of high school. The current methods cannot continue and must be exposed.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 27, 2013

Fortunately, some of us new parents have had tremendous success in schools other than CMS and realize that not every child needs to have tremendous pressure to succeed. Some students are intrinsically motivated and do not need a cattle prod to "push them along." They will be life-long learners and creative thinkers provided they are not stressed to the max. In fact, some of these students are smart enough to know the difference between busy work for the sake of vanity and work designed to challenge them. . Education is not a sprint but a marathon and contrary to popular belief, more is not better...just ask the rest of the industrialized world. Their students spent a fraction of the time our students spend on homework and yet their scores are better. Finally, contrary to popular belief, most high school students do not qualify as adults...there's a reason...brains are still developing. I don't expect 15,16 and 17 olds to make decisions like they're 30. An authoritarian methodology needs to have a balance. I do not see a balance a PHS!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted September 27, 2013

Providence is a top-notch school with an excellent faculty and administration. Students are definitely challenged academically and held to high standards. Additionally, students are treated like adults and expected to perform accordingly. Regarding some of the negative recent reviews from new parents at the school, if you want your child to be well prepared for college, there's no better place than Providence. Yes, the curriculum is strenuous and there's lots of homework. If you're looking for an easy ride, then go somewhere else. Just like everything else in life, you get out of it what you put into it. Providence is a great value and rivals any of the private schools in the county in terms of education, a safe environment, and athletics.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 29, 2013

I am moving and thinking about what high school the kids will be attending in the future. I have always heard that this was the best school around...but I have never spoken with one of its students. Based on the student comments, I feel I may just leave the city. If "the best" is making its students feel overly pressured and crushing their self esteem, then what does that say about the rest of the school system? I am also seeing a pattern in when the positive reviews end and the negative start, and it starts with Dr. Gorman's time here and it just hasn't stopped. Thanks for your comments students and good luck to you.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 19, 2013

We are grateful for the candid comments that appear on this site. We were considering a move to the Charlotte area rather than continuing a 210 mile roundtrip commute. However, we would prefer driving rather than transferring our child to this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 10, 2013

This school is incredibly insensitive to student success. The curriculum is poor and the staff does not teach. As a parent, I watched as my child who loved school turn to despise everyday of attendance. "The Best School in CMS?" I am not sure where this is coming from, but this is a horrible educational institution. I have worked in and seen better! Very SAD day PHS and CMS!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 10, 2013

This is the worst school! Mindless drones taught me! I am in college now with a great GPA. While I was at providence, I suffered greatly because most of my teachers catered to the affluent students who gave the school money. I worked hard in my HONORS courses, but I did not learn anything about liberal studies or the digital world. My friends all felt the same way! I would not do it again, especially when I talk to other students from different states. They made my high school experience horrific, something I will never forget as long as I live.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 14, 2013

The school I go to is full of under achievers and mean students. Not all students are mean, but there are students who are malicious and vindictive, willing to do anything to make you feel/look bad. The smarter groups of people tend to stick together as one big group, where as the popular people tend to hang out together, desperate for attention as always. There is also a slight smoking problem at PHS, where kids who seem to need a constant appetite for looking "cool." The cyber bullying online is tremendous, particularly on websites such as Instagram, Twitter, and Ask.fm. Academics at the school could be better, however, lazy students will continue to be lazy. Some teachers are actually quite excellent, but most fall short of this expectation. Most are not willing to stay after school because they're lazy and unwilling to cooperate. Students can also be pretentious, judging you if you aren't wearing Tory Burch or whatever stupidity dealt out. The social and academic scene aren't great, do your child a favor and do not send him/her to PHS. Waste of time is what it is.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 15, 2013

Not satisfied with this school's recognition of diversity and genuine interest in each child's progress and advancement. So this review is not only related to academics. We are relatively new to Charlotte and like many of the previous reviewers here we suggested this school to our teenager. Seems there are some levels of discrimination and influence coming into play. We can only hope and help our child through those tough social situations they are sometimes faced with. Shamefully there are some teachers and parents alike fueling these toxic situations. No student should have to feel these kind of pressures. Shame on PHS.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 20, 2013

We are from Dallas and was looking for a good HS in Charlotte. Based on the reviews, we are changing our mind about PHS. Our daughter comes from one of the best schools in Dallas and ranks in the top 6% out of 755 kids in her class. High school students have enough pressure just from their environment. The student reviews have made us re-think that PHS is not the school for her. Good luck students!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 7, 2013

This is school has incredible pressure. I came here as a junior from a cms school at North. I was number 3 out of 500 students in my old high school. Here at providence, i am struggling trying to get a 70 to pass the course. The workload is so high and everyone at this school only cares about education. If you are not "born" smart, then you will struggle. Now, i don't even know if i will graduate on time.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 7, 2012

I am currently a senior at Providence High School looking forward to moving on to the collegiate world. Looking back on my experiences in high school, I am sad to say that my time at Providence was discouraging. The school is exceptionally cutthroat, with a subset of teachers (rather than students) fueling an atmosphere of incredible pressure. The pressure is not just academic--certain employees teach with highly personalistic methods, adjusting grades depending on their preferences for certain students and sometimes fighting with one another to retain students in certain classes. Families of students at the school also contribute, often trying to work connections through the guidance department or individual teachers to grant their children a selective advantage--especially in the obtaining of awards, special designations, recommendations, and other elements that look great on paper to a selective college. This atmosphere in turn leads to the development of a group of "chosen ones"--students that tend to accrue most of the credit, much to the detriment of other hard-working, capable individuals. In short, if you go to Providence, prepare to fight for your right to succeed.
—Submitted by a student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 56% in 2012.

7 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
88%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 64% in 2012.

7 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
88%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2012.

7 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
71%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 70% in 2011.

517 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
92%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students71%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
White60%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged67%
Students with disabilities71%
Proficient in English71%

Reading

All Students86%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
White80%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged83%
Students with disabilities86%
Proficient in English86%

Science

All Students71%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
White60%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged67%
Students with disabilities71%
Proficient in English71%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

260 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 82% in 2011.

323 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

488 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Civics and Economics

The state average for Civics and Economics was 80% in 2011.

455 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
>95%
English I

The state average for English I was 83% in 2012.

479 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

495 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%
Physical Science

The state average for Physical Science was 77% in 2011.

82 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
>95%
United States History

The state average for United States History was 82% in 2011.

455 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students50%
Female50%
Male50%
Black29%
Asian69%
Hispanic36%
Multiracial42%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White58%
Economically disadvantaged32%
Not economically disadvantaged56%
Students with disabilities21%
Non-disabled students54%
Limited English proficiency25%
Proficient in English51%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant50%
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Students77%
Female75%
Male80%
Black60%
Asian90%
Hispanic52%
Multiracial67%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White81%
Economically disadvantaged59%
Not economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilities42%
Non-disabled students80%
Limited English proficiency40%
Proficient in English78%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant77%
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Students82%
Female85%
Male79%
Black78%
Asian81%
Hispanic54%
Multiracial87%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White85%
Economically disadvantaged74%
Not economically disadvantaged83%
Students with disabilities35%
Non-disabled students85%
Limited English proficiency40%
Proficient in English83%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant82%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 73% 52%
Black 10% 26%
Asian 9% 3%
Hispanic 5% 14%
Two or more races 3% 4%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 12%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students School social worker/counselors(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Arts & music

Performing and written arts
  • Drama

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • German
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Tracey G Harrill
Associations
  • SACS
Fax number
  • (980) 343-3956

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • German
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Football
Girls sports
  • Soccer

Arts & music

Performing arts
  • Drama
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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1800 Pineville-Matthews Road
Charlotte, NC 28270
Website: Click here
Phone: (980) 343-5390

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