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James Martin Middle

Public | 6-8 | 1076 students

 

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3 stars

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2014:
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2013:
Based on 7 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 6 ratings

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47 reviews of this school


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Posted August 7, 2009

I hate James martin middle school. They pay more attention to the punishments then the academic part. The some of the staff is rude and careless. Some teachers dont need to be there at all, cause they cant teach. I failed the 8th grade because of this school. Please do not go to this school i recommended it.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 22, 2009

Do not blame the teachers for this. Im a student at JMMS and I'm in the honors class. I've learned many things in the honors classes. Maybe it's that parents that let their children run loose in the schools.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 4, 2008

My family just transfered here in FEB. This my son's first year of Middle School, and at this point, I am not too happy with this school. I am a very active parent however, it took me to go talk to the principal to get the teachers to respond to me. I am considering tansfering him to another school for the second half of the year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 26, 2008

This is a terrible school and I would say, Parents beware! The teachers and administration are so overly concerned with punitive measures that the academic emphasis is missing. My son relearned everything he learned previously in CA in the sixth grade in James Martin's 7th and 8th grades.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 26, 2008

I love this school! I used to be a 6th grader here! its was so cool! My teachers Really cared about me and, even though there was alot of drama its was still a good school! I loved it! Now i go to JM Alexander.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 4, 2008

I go to this school my name will remain a secret this school is very safe, it might be on the news more then the president lol but it is very good. I love this school there maybe a little problems but its all right we are all safe. I am tired of people saying its bad, im here to change that.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 3, 2008

I have been happy with the care and support the teachers have shown my son. He trusts that the teachers are there to teach and explain things to him. He has had to learn that he needs to take more responsibility with school work, and the teachers have been able to hold him accountable in a nice way.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 30, 2007

I love this school we learn from each other that to be come succesfull we must find are own path that we can't depend on some one else to do for us.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 8, 2007

hi i am a student at martin middle and yes there are many problems that this school has gone thru this year but i know that the major concern for us students is saftey.. i am am sure that this school will make drastic improvments as class president of 07-08 school year there are some changes that need to be mad .Adnan Zanzibar
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 4, 2007

This schoool needs 2 have better discipline rules 4 children. It is very dirty cause of the rude disreapectful students. They need more rules and new teachers who are more harder.
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 14, 2007

i go to jmms and the teachers there do not explain objectives clear enough the only expect you to memorize the objective for the test or assesssment the next day the whole supposed idea is for teachers to teach the kids not for them to memorize but for it to become a part they can never forget
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 8, 2007

My son recently began attending James Martin ater attending Alexander Middle for his first middle school year. Overall he is happier at James Martin, but I did notice that every day I ask him if he has homework, and just about everyday he tells me no. That surprises me. I also ask him if he has any projects or reports and again th answer is always No. Everytime I visit the school, I hear the same thing, teachers or aides yelling at the top of their lungs at the children which I dont approve of. The student services office need work.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 20, 2007

This school needs more parent involvement. Took me three attempts to get sons schedule changed but worth it now he is in AVID and that is all that matters. Takes hard work and dedication in this world. Too many people give up! I am not one of those parents. I have 2 children in this school this year. I also have one at Vance High in Special needs class and know first hand that you need to push until something happens. Also not just be a talker but a participant. Not stand on the sidelines telling everyone what needs to be done. I am pretty pleased with the first 2 years of having a child and now children in this school. Thank you all staff at James Martin Middle your efforts are shown we all need improvements and it take special people to teach our children. Debra B.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 19, 2007

My Child Loves This School And So Do I!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 15, 2007

I have tried on numerous occasions to contact teachers without success. I have an A/B student who recently earned a D with no notice or warning from the teacher (with whom I attempted to have a conference on several occassions without success). The lack of concern is unbelieveable!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 7, 2007

It amazes me how we can always find room to judge and belittle others. In a world where the responsibility for learning is placed on the shoulders of the educators, there is no wonder that no one is learning. Learning is an internal process, educators can only teach and facilitate the avenues of learning. They cannot FORCE students to learn. It is a wonder that our parents do not reflect upon what they have taught their children. Values, Respect, Integrity, Honesty, Pride, Commitment and Spirituality are all lacking from the students of JMMS. As an educator at JMMS, it frustrates me that most of the complaints that arise regarding the school come from parents who have children who demonstrate the lowest levels of respect for the learning process. Parents are frustrated because THEY have failed their children moreso than the educators, but its simply easier to blame someone else.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted March 20, 2007

My child has attended this school for 2 years. Within a couple of months I noticed a change for the worst. The teachers appear either nonchalant or afraid. There is no expectancy level from the teachers for the students. The principal seems kind enough but lacks direction and the ability to execute.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 12, 2006

The school along with the staff are trying, but the bullies have taken over and I think they need security in order to make a real difference in this school. My child is afraid to go to school daily and is threaten a lot. We are changing ASAP.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 26, 2006

It s funny to hear my concern over and over again. My family and I just relocated here and my son has had nothing but troubles. He was taken back as well with how different the kids are or how different the staffs handle situations. I am not very happy with the staff and getting someone to return your phone call is a full time job. Parents really need to take more control of their kids, it s not the responsibility of the staff at JMM, I think that s part of the problem!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 25, 2006

Do not send your child to this school!!! just as some of the other parents said, we too are recents transplants to charlotte. Our child has never had any problems with peers before this school. She hardly ever has homework.She doesn't even have a math book. The administration is less than desirable from our experience(on her first day) the violence is unbelieveable. To make a long story short, we will be moving this summer to a better school district!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

333 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
16%

2012

 
 
53%

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
55%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

333 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
57%

2011

 
 
49%

2010

 
 
51%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

364 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
20%

2012

 
 
57%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
66%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

360 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
32%

2012

 
 
41%

2011

 
 
47%

2010

 
 
42%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

359 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
10%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
68%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

360 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
19%

2012

 
 
51%

2011

 
 
52%

2010

 
 
54%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

363 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
34%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
56%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students16%
Female21%
Male11%
Black12%
Asian42%
Hispanic26%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White-5%
Economically disadvantaged16%
Not economically disadvantaged16%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students18%
Limited English proficiency-5%
Proficient in English18%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant16%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students21%
Female25%
Male17%
Black18%
Asian50%
Hispanic25%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White11%
Economically disadvantaged20%
Not economically disadvantaged23%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students23%
Limited English proficiency-5%
Proficient in English23%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant21%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students20%
Female23%
Male17%
Black16%
Asian73%
Hispanic23%
Multiracial29%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White10%
Economically disadvantaged18%
Not economically disadvantaged26%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students22%
Limited English proficiency8%
Proficient in English21%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant20%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students32%
Female32%
Male32%
Black29%
Asian64%
Hispanic32%
Multiracial65%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White25%
Economically disadvantaged29%
Not economically disadvantaged42%
Students with disabilities7%
Non-disabled students35%
Limited English proficiency6%
Proficient in English35%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant32%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students10%
Female10%
Male9%
Black6%
Asian33%
Hispanic15%
Multiracial8%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White9%
Economically disadvantaged9%
Not economically disadvantaged12%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students10%
Limited English proficiency11%
Proficient in English9%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant10%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students19%
Female22%
Male17%
Black18%
Asian41%
Hispanic16%
Multiracial25%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White27%
Economically disadvantaged16%
Not economically disadvantaged30%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students21%
Limited English proficiency8%
Proficient in English20%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant19%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students34%
Female34%
Male34%
Black30%
Asian67%
Hispanic40%
Multiracial25%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White46%
Economically disadvantaged31%
Not economically disadvantaged44%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students37%
Limited English proficiency23%
Proficient in English35%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant34%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

103 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
26%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students26%
Female25%
Male28%
Black21%
Asiann/a
Hispanic33%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged21%
Not economically disadvantaged39%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students26%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English26%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant26%
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 67% 26%
Hispanic 20% 14%
Asian 4% 3%
White 4% 52%
Two or more races 3% 4%
American Indian 1% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 81%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students School social worker/counselors(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Arts & music

Music
  • Band

Health & athletics

School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr Jeremy Batchelor
Associations
  • SACS
Fax number
  • (980) 343-5135

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Football
Girls sports
  • Softball
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Music
  • Band
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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7800 Ibm Drive
Charlotte, NC 28262
Website: Click here
Phone: (980) 343-5382

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