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James Martin Middle

Public | 6-8 | 1076 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 7 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 6 ratings

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47 reviews of this school


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Posted October 30, 2013

Teacher harassed and bullied the students and the principal and assistant principal rather discipline the student and not the teacher. They are not focus on education and better there school
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 22, 2013

Teachers can only do so much. What are you doing? Whatever it is you can not blame the school.


Posted September 10, 2013

James Martin Middle School reminds me of the new movie about Steve "Jobs". Forget the past & focus on the future with new leadership! Transform the education world with optimimism & a clear vision. Chuck Sawicki VP NC SCORE Certified Mentor


Posted August 22, 2013

All the kids there are bad and ghetto and the teachers can't even control them everyone there is always saying bad words and they talk about drinking and smoking weed


Posted August 22, 2013

I'm not sure of letting my daughter stay here for the whole 7th grade year most of these reviews are terrible im going to see how the school is from august-December I might have send my daughter to new York if this doesn't work out
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 26, 2013

Out of 30 years of teaching, this school has been the worst experience of my career. A previous review states that "over the past two years bad teachers are no longer a part of this school". That is totally untrue. Most of the teachers left this school because of the principal. And the teachers that left were among the best. Nothing improved, not behavior nor test scores while the principal was in charge. Moral sank to the very bottom.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted January 3, 2013

We will see how they'll fare with the new principal...My daughter graduates in June 2013...
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 12, 2012

My daughter is a sixth grader at this school and she absolutely hates it. This will be my childs last year at this school. In all honesty, it's not the teachers, it's the students. My daughter has had many problems with the students but the teachers have been very helpful.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 13, 2011

I have been trying to get my child transferred out of this school since before it started. The reason is because of all the bad reviews. I don't think,so far, it's as bad as I read, but there are definately problems. My child hates this school for many reasons...its crazy that they cant wear jackets or coats or carry their backpacks. My child has heard a certain teacher threaten a student several times just because the student was talking.This school isn't even the closest to my home.I'm hoping the school board will approve my request for transfer soon.From things I've read and things I've experienced so far this year, the school still needs lots of improvement.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 12, 2011

OK so eveyone is saying that JM is a bad school and teachers dont do anything, and those are all LIES! The school isnt whats bad, its the students who come to school to play, touch people, use profanity, anddo all but learn which makes JM look bad. The teachers at JM work just as hard as the leading teachers in CMS. Then CMS decides to start paying teachers based upon how well their students do on EOGs,which was absurd becasue certain students decide to do what they want when the want and how they want. I attended JM in the 2010-2011 school year and because of all the bad reviews i read i was a little optimistic as to if i should stick the year out or not. But when i saw these teachers in action, believe it or not they work harder than teachers at Smith Academy and they should really be reconized for that. Rigt now i am attending CrestdleMiddle because i moved and i hate it there. Eveeryone is quick to say how good of a school Crestdale is but really all Crestdale has is their ability to rob you of all your money and a couple good reviews. I would much rather attend JMMS than Crestdale anyday. Right nw im tryying to get back in Jm . Its OK go aheAd and send you child to JM!


Posted August 28, 2011

Over the past two years the school has underwent major changes. Teachers who have behaved in an unbecoming way, are no longer a part of the staff. In fact most of the staff is completely new, in all 23 new teachers this year alone. This does not include the turnover in the administrative / support staff. There is now a deeper focus on customer service and developing students emotionally and educationally. The principal pulled his students out of their home school to demonstrate his faith in the school. He is demanding but fair, and expects all to engage in their child's education. The school requires that teachers provide tutoring hours every week, they stay late for three parent teacher conferences (and hand out report cards on the same night). They do parent university courses and have offered students more options to grow. While the reviews of the school are not stellar, you cannot judge this school, or its staff by previous experiences. The school did not get this way overnight, and it has taken almost 2 years to return to form that people can be proud of; which is evident by the UNCC partnership as well as the TIAA-CREF partnership. Stop by an see the new JMMS.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted August 3, 2011

THIS IS A HORRIBLE SCHOOL, THE TEACHERS CURSE AT THE STUDENTS, THEY CHANGE THEIR CLASSES AND REMOVE THEM FROM HONORS CLASSES WHEN THEY FEEL LIKE IT, THE PRINCIPAL DOESNT HELP WITH ANYTHING... I AM TAKING MY CHILD OUT OF THIS SCHOOL. THEY SENT MY CHILD HOME IN 35 DEGREE WEATHER WITH NO COAT. THEY DONT LET THE KIDS USE LOCKERS BUT THEY DONT ALLOW COATS IN CLASS. I HAVE NEVER EXPERIENCED ANYTHING LIKE THIS AND MY CHILD IS GOING TO THE 8TH GRADE LAST YEAR WAS HER FIRST YEAR!!! I READ THESE REVIEWS AND DIDNT TAKE HEED BUT TRUST ME THIS IS A HORRIBLE SCHOOL!!!!! I RATE THIS SCHOOL A ZERO!!! IT'S USELESS AND WE CAN BUILD SOMETHING ELSE IN ITS PLACE...
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 26, 2011

As a student at jm i feel that the school is unsafe in many wasy. thir standards are degrading. i was the victim of the manjy violents acts that took place. i was in a stituation where three students jumped me and security did nothing to intervene. The teachers and staff at james martin are rude and obnoxious an care nothing about student academics and success.


Posted April 21, 2011

I do not recommend any parent enrolling their children in this school even if it is the last option. I have not had a lot of dealings with the principal however, the teachers do the best they can with what they have to work with. We are not from NC and did not know any better than to place our children among this poorly rated school. There is a lot of issues with this school that need to be addressed and handled immediately. The children practically run the school and the teachers are the students. Nothing good can come from allowing your child to attend this school. Please seek other options first.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 24, 2010

In my honest opinion, I would not recommend anyone to enroll their child into this school. My child has only attended this year and so far there are only ongoing issues verses resolutions. The principal is the poorest excuse for a principal that I have seen in seven years. He does not respond to parents, or problems. My child is in honors courses. The children with behavior problems seem to have more power than the actual teachers or principals. As a result this environment is unsafe. The student's best interest is not at heart at this middle school. I volunteered to help get the PTA started and have not heard a word from anyone. If you have the option to place your child at another school, do it!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 17, 2010

I am a former student of James Martin Middle but currently attend Piedmont IB Middle. As someone stated before, I was in the honors courses and made great grades. Parents complain about how James Martin Middle is a school where teachers just yeall and dont teach, students are wild,and the parent involment is poor. Some of the opinons stated are true but James Martin is being changed in greater ways every day. The new prinicipal, Mr. Ayinde Rudolph, i making James Martin a better and safer place for the childrens' education. Every school has there great points and baad points. Piedmont IB isnt the best school in dicipline but the best school in academics. James Martin is in progress for better education and if parents dont think James Martin isnt for there child, then so be it, but James Martin Middle school is a place of excellence and children appreciate that.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 19, 2010

I used to attend to jmms and i think that every school has there problems as well as this one. But there i learn how to share with people from different cultures. Even thought theres good people and bad people everywhere.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 29, 2010

I am a former student of jmms. This school had its ups and downs in the past 3 years. But to be honest this school has major issues in dealing with disipline. Some of the people at this school take it to racial actions but this is just me telling the truth
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 6, 2009

Teachers aren't very friendly & willing to help when parents are concerned about their child. Transferred my child here & grades slipped significantly.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 18, 2009

I love working with the students. They enjoy learning and are excited about learning new and interesting things. The staff is great!!!! We collaborate together, sharing ideas, suggestions and innovative ways to teach.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

333 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
16%

2012

 
 
53%

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
55%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

333 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
57%

2011

 
 
49%

2010

 
 
51%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

364 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
20%

2012

 
 
57%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
66%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

360 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
32%

2012

 
 
41%

2011

 
 
47%

2010

 
 
42%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

359 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
10%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
68%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

360 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
19%

2012

 
 
51%

2011

 
 
52%

2010

 
 
54%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

363 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
34%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
56%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students16%
Female21%
Male11%
Black12%
Asian42%
Hispanic26%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White-5%
Economically disadvantaged16%
Not economically disadvantaged16%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students18%
Limited English proficiency-5%
Proficient in English18%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant16%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students21%
Female25%
Male17%
Black18%
Asian50%
Hispanic25%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White11%
Economically disadvantaged20%
Not economically disadvantaged23%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students23%
Limited English proficiency-5%
Proficient in English23%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant21%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students20%
Female23%
Male17%
Black16%
Asian73%
Hispanic23%
Multiracial29%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White10%
Economically disadvantaged18%
Not economically disadvantaged26%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students22%
Limited English proficiency8%
Proficient in English21%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant20%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students32%
Female32%
Male32%
Black29%
Asian64%
Hispanic32%
Multiracial65%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White25%
Economically disadvantaged29%
Not economically disadvantaged42%
Students with disabilities7%
Non-disabled students35%
Limited English proficiency6%
Proficient in English35%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant32%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students10%
Female10%
Male9%
Black6%
Asian33%
Hispanic15%
Multiracial8%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White9%
Economically disadvantaged9%
Not economically disadvantaged12%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students10%
Limited English proficiency11%
Proficient in English9%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant10%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students19%
Female22%
Male17%
Black18%
Asian41%
Hispanic16%
Multiracial25%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White27%
Economically disadvantaged16%
Not economically disadvantaged30%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students21%
Limited English proficiency8%
Proficient in English20%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant19%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students34%
Female34%
Male34%
Black30%
Asian67%
Hispanic40%
Multiracial25%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White46%
Economically disadvantaged31%
Not economically disadvantaged44%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students37%
Limited English proficiency23%
Proficient in English35%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant34%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

103 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
26%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students26%
Female25%
Male28%
Black21%
Asiann/a
Hispanic33%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged21%
Not economically disadvantaged39%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students26%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English26%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant26%
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 67% 26%
Hispanic 20% 14%
Asian 4% 3%
White 4% 52%
Two or more races 3% 4%
American Indian 1% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 81%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students School social worker/counselors(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Arts & music

Music
  • Band

Health & athletics

School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr Jeremy Batchelor
Associations
  • SACS
Fax number
  • (980) 343-5135

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
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Sports

Boys sports
  • Football
Girls sports
  • Softball
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Music
  • Band
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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7800 Ibm Drive
Charlotte, NC 28262
Website: Click here
Phone: (980) 343-5382

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