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Marie G Davis Military and Global

Public | K-12 | 700 students

Service Learning

 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 8 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

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15 reviews of this school


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Posted Sunday, April 20, 2014

I have a now 3rd grader at MGLA. During 1st grade he had an amazing teacher. At the end of that school year J had a grade equivalent of 5.5. 2nd grade was not as good. It was a disaster. He would often have an upset stomach and dreaded going to school. It seemed that his teacher had a personal issue with one if us. She made goimg to school a bad experience for him. I met with administration a couple of times and the torture continued. Why did I keep him there you ask? I didn't want to keep moving him around. So again in 3rd grade he has a great teacher, however I still am not happy with the school overall. There is too much focus on passing these core tests and not enough focus on academic growth in general. J is not being challenged and has actually fallen off significantly. There will not be a 4th grade seat filled with my son's bottom. We are getting as far from MGLA as we can. As far from CMS as we can. My advise is if you're moving to the Charlotte area, go to Union County.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 5, 2013

This is my first year teaching at MGLA. I had a few choices of schools to pick from when I first moved to Charlotte, but I can honestly say that I love teaching at this school and I know I made the right decision to accept this job. My fellow teachers at this school are wonderful and really care about their students. The leadership and support I receive from administration is also excellent. Both the Principal and Assistant Principal are doing an amazing job at turning this school around and making sure our students succeed academically.. As for the test scores, almost the entire country changed to the Common Core standards, so this dramatically impacted test scores in all those states too. The teachers here at MGLA are doing everything they can to make sure our students are ready for these new exams! I really can't stress anymore how much this truly is a great school! Hopefully others can come out and see for themselves!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted November 30, 2013

Some of the top schools in CMS curve test scores. How do I know? I know people at Myers Park, South Meck, Ardrey Kell, and Providence. They all curve test scores. Every school has slackers. Also, all of NC has had scores drop. I'd rather go to a school with lower test scores than a drug ring like Ardrey Kell where one can easily find black tar, uppers, weed and ADHD pills. Also, don't forget that half of Ardrey Kell's wrestling team got caught in a drug scandal that suspended most and expelled few. Don't judge a book by its cover, as only students really know what goes on when they step off the bus and enter the doors.


Posted November 27, 2013

MGLA is a great school, don't let the current test scores fool you. At this school you will find teachers who care about the students, a principal who is invested in turning this school into the best global leadership academy in the world, and students who give %110 percent to their studies and their school every day. It is not a perfect school, but everyone at the school from staff to students is working hard to be the best they can possibly be. The focus of the school is leadership and global studies and not the military, although the upper school does have a strong JROTC program. I highly recommend this school.


Posted November 21, 2013

Test scores have fallen for All NC and any state that has adopted common core by 40 proficiency points and this includes the so called "good schools" due to a brand new generation of common core tests. I encourage parents to research their school to be sure it's a great fit for the child and them but also have realistic expectations. There is no perfect place because the world is filled with imperfect humans . If you are running from your home school that is not what the school needs, instead this fledgling school needs supportive parents who on board to lead the charge to make MGLA the best Global Leaders Academy.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 20, 2013

Check out the scores for yourself prospective parents! Below average! Marie G. Davis EOG 2013 EOG, avg Mathematics (2013) 11.1 EOG, avg Reading (2013) 36.5 EOG Combined 47.6


Posted October 28, 2013

This is for those Parent that think that by bringing their behaviorally challenge kids to Mary G Davis they will Get an instant change in their Kids please Wake Up. The School change may be the starting point but it takes more than a school transfer to start the change. If we transfer them from the school but do not make changes at home what the use. My children attend Mary g Davis They are not perfect but I transferred them there because I had standards at home that were not being reinforced in school so I looked for a place where they felt like they were at home. At this school they do but like all places it has it flaws and the staff is working hard to make sure it s corrected. Every day I go to take my kids to school I am impressed on how efficient and orderly the process is and how seamless and effortless it is no fuss no chaos. So again think not only what your kids needs but what you are willing to do to make sure he achieves it even if it means going the Extra mile. In my case I am willing and Able to go the extra mile for my Kids and not dump it all on the teachers and school staff we are a team and should interact as such.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 21, 2013

They did get a new principle and she is working vary hard to make positive changes. I have 3 children that go here and the teachers are vary caring. Even the school nurse is great.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 17, 2013

My son attended this school for 2 years and will not be returning. He began his 5th grade year at MGLA and it was great. His teacher was exceptional. Sixth grade was a nightmare. The middle school teachers are not equipped to handle as many children as they do during the day. Some are completely checked out while others seem like they actually do not like children at all. Their discipline methods are unrealistic and immature. They did get a new principle and vice principle this year which in my opinion is a great thing. This school is not a "Military" academy at all. Besides the fact that the students wear uniforms and have formation in the morning, there is nothing military about it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 28, 2011

Dont let the name fool you. The word military in the name does not mean that they take children with discipline problems and fix them. This is a regular public school with a school wide Army ROTC program for Junior High - High school students. It is a K-12 school as of the 2011-2012 school year. However I wouldn't reccomend this school if you have elementary students, because they can see and hear the teenage students doing inappropriate things in the halls or bus. Also, there are a lot of children in the school who are a discipline problem and disrupt the learning environment. The uniforms may only be purchased at Educational Outfitters which are outrageously priced. Some teachers care and work hard for their students. However there is no religious tolerance at the school either, expect no consideration for religious attire.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 8, 2011

My daughter has been attending this school for 2 years and now both my young boys will be attending this up comming year. The teachers have great communication with the parents and the Principal/ Assistant is always available for any questions at any time. The school/programs definitely keep the students in line. We feel that MGLA offers challenging academic programs and has strong principal/school leadership!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 18, 2011

Change The Time Back To What It Was Last Year. The School Needs To Start Early Like It Did Last Year.


Posted March 31, 2010

I moved my two middle school students from a private school to Military and Global in January, and I could not be more impressed. The school itself is beautiful, and the atmosphere is positive, upbeat and organized. Our first exposure was with the guidence counselor who was professional, and answered our questions and followed up to place our children where they needed to be, not just where their grade level dictated or there was space available. Even while begining mid year the children were welcomed by both staff and students, and aclimated very quickly. The teachers have been fantastic, the children are excited about going to school and learning. This school really does have an open door policy when it comes to parent inquiries as to curriculum, student progress and problem solving. I whole heartedly disagree with the review saying that it is a haven for kids with discipline problems.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 2, 2009

Although the school's concept is that of a public military college prep, it has become a haven for kids with discipline problems.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 26, 2009

I feel this school has taught my son alot since he has attended this school. I like the way the staff and teachers stay on the kids about uniforms, grades and how the teachers communicates with the parents by e-mail.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

55 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
24%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

55 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
27%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
40%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2012

 
 
57%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
23%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
20%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
27%

2012

 
 
43%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

68 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
12%

2012

 
 
51%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
81%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

68 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2012

 
 
51%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

64 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
8%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
65%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
27%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
64%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

65 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
14%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

65 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
37%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
60%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

65 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
54%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 56% in 2012.

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 64% in 2012.

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2012.

2012

 
 
n/a
Writing

The state average for Writing was 70% in 2011.

41 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
76%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students24%
Female26%
Male22%
Black21%
Asiann/a
Hispanic28%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged22%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students26%
Limited English proficiency29%
Proficient in English22%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant24%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students27%
Female30%
Male25%
Black24%
Asiann/a
Hispanic33%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged27%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students28%
Limited English proficiency21%
Proficient in English29%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant27%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students40%
Female47%
Male38%
Black34%
Asiann/a
Hispanic57%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged40%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students45%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English40%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant40%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students46%
Female53%
Male43%
Black41%
Asiann/a
Hispanic57%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged42%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students51%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English46%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant46%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students23%
Female27%
Male21%
Black22%
Asiann/a
Hispanic18%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged23%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students24%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English27%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant23%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students20%
Female15%
Male24%
Black22%
Asiann/a
Hispanic6%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged17%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students24%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English23%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant20%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students27%
Female19%
Male32%
Black30%
Asiann/a
Hispanic6%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged23%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students28%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English31%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant27%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students12%
Female6%
Male18%
Black9%
Asiann/a
Hispanic6%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged7%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students14%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English13%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant12%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students46%
Female44%
Male47%
Black40%
Asiann/a
Hispanic53%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged39%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities10%
Non-disabled students52%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English50%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant46%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students8%
Female12%
Male5%
Black-5%
Asiann/a
Hispanic19%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White10%
Economically disadvantaged9%
Not economically disadvantaged6%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students9%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English9%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant8%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students27%
Female31%
Male24%
Black19%
Asiann/a
Hispanic38%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White40%
Economically disadvantaged26%
Not economically disadvantaged29%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students30%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English30%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant27%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students14%
Female18%
Male11%
Black15%
Asiann/a
Hispanic6%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged10%
Not economically disadvantaged22%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students15%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English15%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant14%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students37%
Female32%
Male41%
Black38%
Asiann/a
Hispanic25%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged24%
Not economically disadvantaged61%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students39%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English38%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant37%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students68%
Female64%
Male70%
Black62%
Asiann/a
Hispanic56%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged57%
Not economically disadvantaged87%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students71%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English73%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant68%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

64 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
25%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
89%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 82% in 2011.

21 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
38%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 83% in 2012.

27 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
82%
Civics and Economics

The state average for Civics and Economics was 80% in 2011.

43 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
79%
English I

The state average for English I was 83% in 2012.

54 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
88%
Physical Science

The state average for Physical Science was 77% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
United States History

The state average for United States History was 82% in 2011.

24 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
71%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students25%
Female19%
Male30%
Black27%
Asiann/a
Hispanic18%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White17%
Economically disadvantaged22%
Not economically disadvantaged30%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students27%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English27%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant25%
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Students57%
Female50%
Male61%
Black48%
Asiann/a
Hispanic70%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged58%
Not economically disadvantaged54%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students57%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English57%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant57%
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Students50%
Female53%
Male48%
Black48%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged52%
Not economically disadvantaged46%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students52%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English52%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant50%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 57% 26%
Hispanic 28% 14%
White 9% 52%
Two or more races 4% 4%
Asian 2% 3%
American Indian 1% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 76%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

College readiness and student pathways

Percentage of students going to 2-year college 30% (2013)
Percentage of students going to 4-year college 40% (2013)
Percentage of students going to the military 30% (2013)
Colleges most students attend after graduation CPCC
UNC Schools
Read more about resources at this school
Source: Manually entered by a school official.

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Assistant principal(s)
Art teacher(s)
ELL/ESL Coordinator
Gifted specialist(s)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Math specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
PE instructor(s)
Poetry/Creative writing teacher(s)
Foreign languages spoken by school staff American sign language
Arabic languages
French
German
Spanish
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by a school official.

Special education / special needs

Level of special education programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Engineering
Staff resources available to students
  • Math specialist(s)
School facilities
  • Outdoor learning lab
Vocational or skills-based training offered
  • Computer programming
  • Engineering
Visual arts
  • Architecture

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • Poetry/Creative writing teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Music room
  • Performance stage
Visual arts
  • Architecture
  • Ceramics
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Arabic languages
  • German
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Staff resources available to students
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • American sign language
  • Arabic languages
  • French
  • German
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • PE instructor(s)
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Multi-purpose room ("cafegymatorium")

Gifted & talented

Instructional and/or curriculum models used
  • Advanced placement courses
  • Honors track
Extra learning resources offered
  • Acceleration
Staff resources available to students
  • Gifted specialist(s)
College preparation / awareness resources offered
  • College prep programs/courses during the year
  • College presentations or information sessions
  • SAT/ACT prep classes
School leaders can update this information here.

School basics

School start time
  • 9:15 am
School end time
  • 4:15 pm
School Leader's name
  • Ann Laszewski
Best ways for parents to contact the school
  • Phone
Gender
  • Coed
Is there an application process?
  • Yes
Fax number
  • (980) 343-1735

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Advanced placement courses
  • College prep
  • Core knowledge
  • Direct instruction
  • Honors track
Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Engineering
  • Global
  • Humanities
  • Service learning
  • Social justice
Level of special education programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Foreign languages taught
  • Arabic languages
  • German
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Vocational or skills-based training offered
  • Computer programming
  • Construction / building
  • Engineering

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
  • Gifted specialist(s)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Math specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • Poetry/Creative writing teacher(s)
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • American sign language
  • Arabic languages
  • French
  • German
  • Spanish
Extra learning resources offered
  • Acceleration
  • Career/college counseling
  • Counseling
College preparation / awareness resources offered
  • College prep programs/courses during the year
  • College presentations or information sessions
  • SAT/ACT prep classes
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Art room
  • Auditorium
  • Cafeteria
  • Learning lab
  • Multi-purpose room ("cafegymatorium")
  • Music room
  • Outdoor learning lab
  • Performance stage
Partnerships with local resources and organizations
  • CFF
  • World Affairs Council
  • Chapel Hill Worldview
School leaders can update this information here.

Sports

Boys sports
  • Rugby
Girls sports
  • Field hockey

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Architecture
  • Ceramics
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing arts
  • None
Media arts
  • None
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Dress Code
  • Uniforms
Bullying policy
  • This school has a bullying and/or cyber bullying policy in place.
Parent involvement
  • Attend parent nights
  • Join PTO/PTA
  • Serve on school improvement team or governance council
  • Volunteer in the classroom
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

 

This school accepts applications on a

rolling basis

 
Apply now
 

What are your chances?


8 out of 10students were accepted for the 2013-2014 school year.


Students accepted for the 2013-2014 school year
165
Applications received for the 2013-2014 school year
200

Planning ahead

Students typically attend these schools after graduating
Military
NC State Schools
College preparation / awareness offered
SAT/ACT prep classes
College presentations or information sessions
College prep programs/courses during the year
Students' post-graduation plans in 2013
2 year college - 30%
4 year college - 40%
Military - 30%
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

3351 West Griffith St
Charlotte, NC 28203
Website: Click here
Phone: (980) 343-0006

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