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Carolina International School

Charter | K-11 | 735 students

 

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Living in Concord

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $183,800. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $760.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 3 ratings
2013:
Based on 11 ratings
2012:
Based on 4 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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36 reviews of this school


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Posted March 4, 2014

This is a great school. My child has been attending it for 2 years and is very happy and academically strong. We love it!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 30, 2014

I also have a child at CIS and overall we are very happy! I will say that I have seen some very positive improvements, particularly regarding communication with the recent change in leadership. I do challenge the school though to increase the overall academic rigor for our children. Most of us seek out specialty skills because we are looking for something "more". While the diversity can not be beat I do believe that increasing the baseline challenge learning particularly in the younger grades can be improved. I will say that the most of the teachers and it seems now that administration as well are willing to work with parents to see the children excel and exceed! At the end of the day we are glad we are apart of the CIS family!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 30, 2014

I have two children in CIS ands we love it. The teachers are awesome. The school has recently gone through a leadership change that I am hoping will only improve the quality of learning. The diversity of education received at CIS is just not something you will find at the local county schools. I can only speak for K-5 but with the current change of leadership I will continue to send my student because I believe things are going in the right direction. Over 500 applicator for the new school year. Let the demand speak for itself!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 30, 2013

This school could have received 5 stars. Now that Ms. Nelmes has been released, this school may gain some type of unity considering close to 25 teachers have left in 2.5 years. That school had excellent teachers and an excellent assistant principal, Ms. Hoyle. Ms. Hoyle should have been the principal. That school lacked leadership and was ruled through fear and control. I hope the next leader that comes on board will help those teachers who are left to rebuild and get back to the main focus, teaching and developing. Power and control does not lead to successful students or raise teacher morale. Teachers teach because they love to teach. Hoping things will turn around for students and staff now that Ms. Nelmes is gone.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 12, 2013

We have had 3 kids in CIS. At first when Mr. Beall was the administrator the School was wonderful and the teachers were a breath of fresh air compared to CMS. The teachers gave full attention to the students and met them at their competence level. Since the Board fired Mr. Beall and the princeple and replaced them the school is now giving an education that is sub par to even some public schools. We finally moved and withdrew our kids to the local county public schools where many of their former CIS teachers escaped to. Though a public school there is less stress and favoritism than there was at the private fiefdom known as CIS. The good news is that the NCGA has loosened the number of Charter Schools that can be formed in NC and this may force CIS' Board to make changes to keep students. The current administration should not even be trusted with managing the Daisy Hill Puppy Farm Obedience School..
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 1, 2013

I do not understand why quality teachers who genuinely care and understand individual students are constantly being let go and/or fired. Beginning in about 2011, the quality of the administration has been atrocious. I do not understand how these people were chosen to manage a school. I do not get any answers from anyone and there seems to be sort favoritism for students whose parents donate and volunteer often. One year is enough for my student.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 1, 2013

I was a student at Carolina International School from 2005-2010. From my experiences at CIS, everything was quite excellent up until 2009. I am surprised the school still holds such a high rating. The teachers were top-notch. There were a number of afterschool activities I could choose from and the class size (19-21) was ideal for being able to make and maintain relationships with friends and still be able to interact with a number of other people. The original director, Richard Beall left the 2007-2008 school year. After that, things at the school, went downhill. Afterschool opportunities were very much cut down for older students and there was a great exodus of many students because of the downfall in the quality of education. When I left in 2010, my siblings continued to attend CIS. The new management was atrocious and was not capable handling crises and the quality of education for middle and high school students is dropping. Overall, I feel that Carolina International School today, is not an ideal choice for any student. The quality of education for the elementary seems to be quite good, but I would never recommend this school for a student over the fifth grade level.


Posted August 22, 2013

I must admit the experience has been far better than I expected. After a year in private school, we were somewhat reluctant to make the leap to CIS. I have not been overly impressed with the administration, yet our experience with our classroom teachers more than makes up the difference thus far. Simple logistics like drop off and pick up assistance is often times lacking depending on the morning and the teachers assigned to the area. Overall, I am greatly pleased with our decision, and hope that the administration and core staff recognize opportunities for improvement and are committed to them. Lastly, the PTSO is very impactful and strong, despite the fact that only a few parents display the commitment to keep the organizations sound.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 1, 2013

Nepotism runs this school. If you are not in the click the rumors will be abound. It is sad because it can be a great school but instead it is all about telling people what they want to hear rather than the truth.


Posted June 4, 2013

Received an excellent education in the 7th on par with the previous private school education since K4 but will not be returning in the fall from our experience in the 8th! This year has been both a loss of returning & mass exodus of great teachers, leaving mostly 'lemons' to educate (some excellent teachers remain for elective courses). Reasons of budgeting has been the continued explanation provided as to why so many teachers have left. The week prior to EOC's, we were informed of the termination of the math teacher after receiving an email from said teacher that 14 of 20 chapters were not covered for the year. Administration is disorganized and non-informative. You will receive news through your child or the PTSO before hearing from school admin. I've given 2 stars because the PTSO is wonderfully managed with up to date information provided through their website and Facebook page and some teachers strive to do their best to educate children despite the lack of assistance. Overall, this school is extremely lacking in funding for efficient teachers, resources and organized administration which translates to a poorly managed middle and high school education for your child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 26, 2013

Our school is excellent. Our administration and staff are effective, efficient, and supportive. We have 2 children who attend the school. We are in our 3rd year. We have received wonderful support from all areas for our child who has different needs to support her learning style. Ms. Nelmes & Mrs. Harkey truly know the children and provide a supportive learning environment in conjunction with the staff. My only reservations are with the BoD pushing so hard with regard to testing & the changes to the grading scale. We chose CIS because of the International, community school approach, as well as the open door policy for parental involvement. We still love the school & hope to see a return to the 10 point grading scale through out the school & a return to emphasis on the 1-4 scale through 6th grade! 1= no mastery & 4= to above grade level.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 22, 2013

I have a first-grader at CIS. Because CIS is a charter school, parents choose the school. Parents generally are concerned and have a strong interest in their's child's success. I believe this makes the student body more focused and disciplined compared to most public schools. This helps create a positive atmosphere for learning. The teachers are generally professional and dedicated. The principal is certainly qualified on paper, but there's something about her approach and management style that always makes me scratch my head and wonder how she made it this far. The reality does not quite match the resume. The website is fabulous-looking, extremely attractive, well-designed and informative. However, I am almost certain the student photos are not really photos of CIS students. I have never seen any of them before and they are not wearing the CIS uniforms. If they are not CIS students, it seems misleading at best and dishonest at worst. Overall, we are happy with the school and want to see it continue to succeed.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 13, 2013

My daughter is in Kindergarten this year. We were lucky enough to be the LAST person admitted to the school. My occupation is in creating Learning Strategy for a large global company so needless to say, I am very particular about where I send my child. I can honestly say I am very pleased with CIS. We have a wonderful teacher and are always impressed by all faculty that we come in contact with. There is plenty of opportunity to be an involved parent.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 3, 2013

Fantastic School. Three of my children attend there. One for 8 years, one for 4 years, and one for 2 years. Exceptional program and allows for children to not only obtain the required test score education but also added focus on international and environment awareness. It's great knowing my children can speak chinese and spanish at early age. I can't say enough about the school and how wells its done for my children!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 17, 2012

Just awful, needs much work 21 teachers left in under 6 months. The principal Ms. Nelmes needs to be fired!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 18, 2012

I removed my child this year, because so many wonderful teachers have left or been fired for no reason. A school is only as good as its teachers!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 19, 2012

We have been with the school for 3 years now and we could not ask for better teachers or administration. Mrs. Nelmes always has a kind word and a hug for my kids. My son and daughter have learned so much and can explore their environment with teachers that encourage them to learn from all that is around them. We love CIS!!!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 6, 2012

I have two children here doing extremely well. I have one 3rd grader who does "study island" and one in kindergarten. They both have excellent teachers.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 8, 2010

I had two children who attended here. They do not differentiate with students---so if your child is behind in a subject matter they do not assist. We struggled for 3 years to get a IEP---they help gifted but not those below grade average. New administrator- focuses on mission instead of individual children and there needs. Since my two children have transferred to another school- they have been thriving- new school focuses on different learning styles and teaches at different levels. Concept of school is good- culture and environment but should not come at a detriment to reading, writing and arithmetic.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted October 13, 2010

This school embraces each student to enable them to reach their full potential. The culture is also very in-line with nature and they have outdoor classes and eco-friendly studies as part of their normal routine!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

70 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
93%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

70 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
93%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

70 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
82%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

69 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
86%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
80%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
89%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
15%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
82%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
20%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
88%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
86%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

41 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
29%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

41 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
91%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

41 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
86%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Writing

The state average for Writing was 70% in 2011.

11 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
64%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students60%
Female66%
Male54%
Black30%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White61%
Economically disadvantaged58%
Not economically disadvantaged60%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students66%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English61%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant60%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students71%
Female80%
Male63%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White74%
Economically disadvantaged67%
Not economically disadvantaged72%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students77%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English73%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant71%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students53%
Female51%
Male55%
Black33%
Asian73%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White56%
Economically disadvantaged56%
Not economically disadvantaged52%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students53%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English57%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant53%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students65%
Female61%
Male71%
Black53%
Asian80%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White66%
Economically disadvantaged69%
Not economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students68%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English68%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant65%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students39%
Female27%
Male45%
Black27%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White41%
Economically disadvantaged30%
Not economically disadvantaged42%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students42%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English38%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant39%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students50%
Female60%
Male45%
Black27%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White59%
Economically disadvantaged50%
Not economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students54%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English51%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant50%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students15%
Female13%
Male16%
Black<5%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White19%
Economically disadvantaged10%
Not economically disadvantaged17%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students16%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English16%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant15%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students20%
Female11%
Male26%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White17%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged23%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students20%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English21%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant20%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students50%
Female58%
Male44%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White48%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged54%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students55%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English52%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant50%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students41%
Female23%
Male67%
Black30%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White50%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged46%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students39%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English45%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant41%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students64%
Female62%
Male67%
Black60%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White71%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged63%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students68%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English68%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant64%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students29%
Female35%
Male24%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White40%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged33%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students32%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English32%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant29%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students56%
Female70%
Male43%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White64%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged58%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students61%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English58%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant56%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students68%
Female80%
Male57%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White84%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students74%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English71%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant68%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

35 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
40%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

11 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
36%
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

11 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 82% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology

The state average for Biology was 83% in 2012.

7 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
83%
Civics and Economics

The state average for Civics and Economics was 80% in 2011.

12 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
92%
English I

The state average for English I was 83% in 2012.

15 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
82%
Physical Science

The state average for Physical Science was 77% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
United States History

The state average for United States History was 82% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students40%
Female35%
Male47%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White39%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged41%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students41%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English40%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant40%
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Students36%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students36%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English36%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant36%
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Students82%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students82%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English82%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant82%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 59% 52%
Black 20% 26%
Asian 9% 3%
Hispanic 8% 14%
Two or more races 3% 4%
American Indian 1% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 17%N/A52%
Female 51%N/A49%
Male 49%N/A51%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

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School basics

School start time
  • 8:30 am
School end time
  • 3:30 pm
School Leader's name
  • Sally Reynolds, Middle/High School
Fax number
  • (704) 455-4672
School leaders can update this information here.

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9545 Poplar Tent Rd
Concord, NC 28027
Website: Click here
Phone: (704) 455-3847

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