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Weddington Hills Elementary

Public | K-5 | 839 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
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2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
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12 reviews of this school


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Posted April 29, 2012

We have a daughter in the first grade and a son about to enter Kindergarten. In the past two years, we have had overall positive experiences. Our daughter's kindergarten teacher gave us daily behavioral feedback, and homework folders were always updated. Her first grade teacher is not as organized though has been promptly available for brief phone calls and has expressed genuine interest in our daughter's progress. Our daughter is reading fluently and can do simple addition and subtraction in her head. The curriculum needs more emphasis on science in the earlier grades, which is entirely lacking. The administration has been helpful and prompt on the few occasions where we had to interact with them.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 19, 2010

This school is not a great school in the least. The principal is a lost cause. I wish we had a choice where i children went to school. They know they cant reat parents anyway they wont to bc we have no other choice.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 27, 2009

I have a daughter just finishing up 1st grade. Her 2 years at Weddington have exceeded our expectations in regards to continuous improvement in reading, writing, math, and art. She is always eager to go to school. Perhaps she has been fortunate to get great teachers, but we are more than pleased with this school. Only issues so far are a very high percentage of non English speaking students (which can slow down the entire class). We have a son that starts there next year as well.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 3, 2008

I have had issues with this school for the two years my child has attended. I personal do not feel that my child is 100% safe at this school.I base this on personal experiences
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 17, 2008

Yes I do believe this school big time improvement. Seems like school is no interested in academic at all. Only thing I read about in the homework folder is skate night or staff basketball game. I took chance last year to keep my child in this school but no more My child is not going to this school any more. My child third grade teacher was hardly interested in taking to the parents about the child academics. Teachers websites are never current. No weekly news letters are sent home. This school needs new principle who has more academic views.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 17, 2007

I do believe that this school has great potential. I don't believe the principal really has a desire to talk with the parents or have parental input. She feels free to allow the PTO 'click' to run the show. The fundraisers are lame. My daughters first grade teacher at WHE was wonderful. She gave individual attention to the kids and to each parent. I felt as if my child were in the best of hands. My daughters attitude towards school changed dramatically [her second grade year]. Now third grade is about to begin. She will start this school year back at WHE. Not my choice. We are moving soon to a county adjacent to this one. Not soon enough.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 7, 2007

There is no value of diversity. The school is poorly organized with little leadership from the principal. The administrative team is a tight little clique that is openly hostile to parent interest and input. This school needs a new principal who is willing to substantively involve parents in operations of the school. Weddington Hills serves a community that wants to be involved and has a great deal to offer. Unfortunately the school is closed to anyone who refuses to have a sycophantic relationship with the principal and her lackeys. Teachers in this school are afraid to innovate, because it is discouraged by the principal.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 29, 2007

I agree that Weddington Hills needs improvement. I am more informed about the Skating Parties, Staff Basketball Games and extracurricular activities than about academics. The teacher's do not keep their pages current on the website, there are very few newsletters and nothing from the PTO/PTA. We have a long way to go to reach excellence.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 2, 2007

Cabarrus County is the best school system in North Carolina. One particular school, Weddington Hills Elementary is off the charts. The staff cares about each student and learning is a priority. Our princiPAL (to correct some other comment spellings, is supportive and only wants the best for our students. Thanks Weddington!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted September 19, 2006

I am disappointed at the school academic programs. My child went to a different school in same county last year. This school is way behind academically than the last school. They are still reviewing 1st grade stuff in fourth week of 2nd grade. They hardly give any homework. They don't have any school/principle weekly letter to let parents know what is going on in the school. Teacher doesn't have any weekly letter either for parents to let them know what their child is going to learn this week. WH is very unorganized about lot of things. One in particular is Student drop off and pick up. They need some organization. Their teacher need to use WH web site to post their homework and class info like other Cabarrus county school. Class web sites are not current at all.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 9, 2006

My daughter is in 3rd grade here and loves it, she works very hard, and makes all A's. This is a great school, I love it. I would reccommend it to anyone. The teachers here are mostly young and know all the newest ways of things. They are very involved, with the children. The principles are outstanding. i work at another school, so I don't get to come down alot, but I believe this is a very good school. I wish this school went higher than 5th grade. The only thing I disagree on , is the level of homework. She has way too much homework every night. but then in the long run, it will help her out I guess. Other than homework, I totally love the school, so does my daughter.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 1, 2004

Weddington hills is a wonderful school. This is my daughter's 2nd year attending, and i could not ask for a nicer staff or better education level. My daughter loves her teachers, they are very thorough and keep the parents involved.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

116 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
86%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

116 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
64%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

156 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
84%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

156 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
68%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

136 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
76%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

136 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
36%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
76%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

136 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
35%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students41%
Female41%
Male40%
Black21%
Asiann/a
Hispanic30%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White56%
Economically disadvantaged29%
Not economically disadvantaged59%
Students with disabilities24%
Non-disabled students43%
Limited English proficiency23%
Proficient in English47%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant41%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students41%
Female41%
Male40%
Black16%
Asiann/a
Hispanic19%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White62%
Economically disadvantaged29%
Not economically disadvantaged59%
Students with disabilities29%
Non-disabled students42%
Limited English proficiency10%
Proficient in English52%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant41%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students56%
Female57%
Male56%
Black40%
Asiann/a
Hispanic36%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White77%
Economically disadvantaged35%
Not economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disabilities19%
Non-disabled students66%
Limited English proficiency-5%
Proficient in English66%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant56%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students46%
Female42%
Male51%
Black40%
Asiann/a
Hispanic25%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White63%
Economically disadvantaged29%
Not economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilities16%
Non-disabled students54%
Limited English proficiency-5%
Proficient in English54%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant46%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students44%
Female44%
Male44%
Black13%
Asiann/a
Hispanic19%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White67%
Economically disadvantaged14%
Not economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilities9%
Non-disabled students51%
Limited English proficiency-5%
Proficient in English49%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant44%
Academically gifted94%

Reading

All Students36%
Female44%
Male27%
Black25%
Asiann/a
Hispanic15%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White55%
Economically disadvantaged18%
Not economically disadvantaged58%
Students with disabilities14%
Non-disabled students40%
Limited English proficiency-5%
Proficient in English40%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant36%
Academically gifted89%

Science

All Students35%
Female37%
Male32%
Black13%
Asiann/a
Hispanic11%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White59%
Economically disadvantaged12%
Not economically disadvantaged61%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students40%
Limited English proficiency-5%
Proficient in English38%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant35%
Academically gifted94%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 44% 52%
Hispanic 36% 14%
Black 14% 26%
Two or more races 3% 4%
Asian 2% 3%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 62%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mrs Janet Smith
Fax number
  • (704) 795-9388

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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4401 Weddington Road Northwest
Concord, NC 28027
Website: Click here
Phone: (704) 795-9385

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