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Conway Middle School

Public | 5-8 | 396 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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6 reviews of this school


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Posted August 22, 2013

Conway Middle School is awesome. They actually have teachers that care for the students at school and out of school. Conway Middle has a staff/team that has the drive to win. Inorder for them to continue to be they best they have to continue to support the students in every way possible. My child has been attending this school for the last two (2) years and i have met some of the most humble people.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 4, 2010

This school is one of the most racially charged schools my kids have attended. This is their year in this school transferring from hertford county. I have heard them referring to the students as 'that little white girl' or 'that white kid', not to mention the way the school itself is run. Mr. Branch is straight forward and I will talk to him before I want to talk to anyone else, except for the vice principal Mrs byrd-Robbinson, she is attentive and willing to listen and seems to be the only one in the office with a little sense on how to talk to the students or the parents. The principal should not be running that school, a grizzly bear would be warmer and more attentive to the needs of the student body. I'm very disappointed in this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 2, 2009

Both of my children go to CMS; I myself went to CMS(the old one same location) and my mother was the principal there for about 4 years. I have got to say since 1987 when I first graced the halls I was impressed at the dedication and professionalism of the staff as well as their desire to futher the education of these kids. If I had anything negative to say it would be to the government and the state for allowing the underpayment of these licenced professionals. Go Blue Devils!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 11, 2007

Quality of the academic programs could be tremendously improved if administrators would allow extracurricula activities to be incorporated into the major core classes. Overall, I would judge the academic programs to be in need of some major overhauls. There seems to be an over-interest in basketball, football, little volley and baseball, with other activities going totally unmentioned, except the reading of their mentioning in a textbook or a news article. The performing arts appear not to be of a top priority of the leadership team. The arts are untouchable and out of the question. Eventhough I am an active member of the PTSO at another school,I have not been involved here at Conway Middle. This will be improved for this academic school year. I would like to be used wherever feasibly my service and expertise can be utilized. I have omitted my name purposefully, hoping that I will get a response, thus pulling
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 11, 2006

I'm a parent who has a child at Conway Middle. I have been very happy with the staff at Conway Middle school. They have been very helpful and very concern about the childrens welfare at conway. Mr.Ennitt (principal)and Mr. Branch is a father as well as a principal to those children. The teachers are very concern about the childs well-being and their learning abilities. When my child leaves home I do not have to worry about him because I know that when he leaves home, he is going to a safe place to learn.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 9, 2003

This school needs to have trained teachers who know how to teach children with ADD/ADHD and other disabilities the teachers at this school would rather kid a child out of there class than have to take the time to explain something one more time. This school needs to have trained teachers in the area of disiabilties.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

101 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
39%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

100 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
49%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
46%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

100 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
54%

2011

 
 
58%

2010

 
 
31%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

103 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
12%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
61%

2010

 
 
85%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

103 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
19%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
58%

2010

 
 
70%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

102 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
18%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
63%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

102 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
28%

2012

 
 
53%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
39%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

76 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
12%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
80%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

76 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
25%

2012

 
 
61%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
56%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

77 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
65%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students33%
Female40%
Male26%
Black24%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White57%
Economically disadvantaged26%
Not economically disadvantaged63%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students34%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English32%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant32%
Academically gifted83%

Reading

All Students21%
Female19%
Male23%
Black16%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White35%
Economically disadvantaged14%
Not economically disadvantaged53%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students22%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English21%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant21%
Academically gifted75%

Science

All Students39%
Female38%
Male40%
Black32%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White57%
Economically disadvantaged32%
Not economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students41%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English39%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant39%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students12%
Female11%
Male12%
Black9%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White25%
Economically disadvantaged10%
Not economically disadvantaged20%
Students with disabilities6%
Non-disabled students13%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English12%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant12%
Academically gifted80%

Reading

All Students19%
Female24%
Male14%
Black18%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White30%
Economically disadvantaged17%
Not economically disadvantaged33%
Students with disabilities6%
Non-disabled students22%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English20%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant20%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students18%
Female24%
Male12%
Black11%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White23%
Economically disadvantaged15%
Not economically disadvantaged29%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students20%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English18%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant18%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students28%
Female31%
Male24%
Black21%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White39%
Economically disadvantaged25%
Not economically disadvantaged41%
Students with disabilities8%
Non-disabled students30%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English28%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant28%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students12%
Female18%
Male7%
Black8%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White23%
Economically disadvantaged7%
Not economically disadvantaged28%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students15%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English12%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant12%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students25%
Female38%
Male14%
Black21%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White32%
Economically disadvantaged24%
Not economically disadvantaged28%
Students with disabilities14%
Non-disabled students27%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English25%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant25%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students58%
Female68%
Male51%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White78%
Economically disadvantaged51%
Not economically disadvantaged83%
Students with disabilities27%
Non-disabled students66%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English59%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant58%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

20 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students45%
Female50%
Malen/a
Black27%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged50%
Not economically disadvantaged40%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students45%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English45%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant45%
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 70% 26%
White 24% 52%
Hispanic 3% 14%
Two or more races 2% 4%
American Indian 0% 1%
Asian 0% 3%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 81%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr Oliver Holley
Associations
  • SACS
Fax number
  • (252) 585-0335

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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400 East Main Street
Conway, NC 27820
Website: Click here
Phone: (252) 585-0312

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