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Community School Of Davidson

Charter | K-12 | 1184 students

 
 

Living in Davidson

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $250,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $820.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
Last modified
Community Rating

5 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 4 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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102 reviews of this school


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Posted April 5, 2014

CSD is not for everyone. No school is perfect. My husband and I have 4 kids at CSD, have relocated 3 times and have had kids enrolled in a very small private school, a large public school, as well as Charlotte public schools before enrolling our kids at CSD. As a parent, I will be always be involved in my children's education no matter what school they attend. That being said, overall CSD is a true community of loving, caring and involved parents and educators. We have enjoyed our time at CSD and our kids have thrived. They score in the 90+ percentile on their standardized testing (w/o CSD teaching to the tests), have strong relationships with their peers and their teachers. They've learned to value themselves and others, to work hard, to respect others and their differences and to give back to the community. However, now that they will be graduating their first senior class, they need to decide if they are going to be a school who focuses on special needs, the arts or sports. In my opinion, you cannot do all three successfully. They need a focus that includes academic excellence, global understanding, leadership as well as the New School philosophy.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 16, 2014

The last three most recent reviews of this school are accurate. Lower school administration was unpleasant and extremely difficult to communicate with. I agree with a previous review that the administrator seems very "anti-gifted" or unwilling to work with children who may be advanced beyond their peers. Their philosophy of working with the child on an individual will not apply unless your child is average or below. It is unfortunate as some of the teachers are wonderful.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 4, 2013

I agree with what has been said about gifted students. This school's philosophy is to keep everyone on the same level. I have had children at the elementary, middle and high school, and I would not send my kids here past 5th grade. When my children switched to the public schools they were behind in LA and math. The way the school does their grading and how they hand out merits is not the same criteria as other schools. During the middle school years a social agenda is pushed more than academics. The school has become very progressive and one of the high school administrators has a political background and no education experience. This administrator has made it a point to introduce civic engagement through the practicum programs. She is a town commissioner and has been quoted as wanting to get students involved in political change through her relationship with Youth Davidson. It is also true that a conservative would have difficulty here. The school does promote homosexuality, and high school students are steered towards social issues and non-profits rather than capitalist type of careers. Prospective parents need to go in with eyes wide open and not just follow the masses.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 9, 2013

This school is really only for typical kids not gifted and administration is terrible. Your children will not be allowed to speak there mind and if they do they get reprimanded. I suggest you just keep looking.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 30, 2013

We found the lower school administrator to be very unpleasant and difficult to work with. Several parents and staff have complained. If you have a typical or autistic child, you will be fine. Parents with very bright kids or gifted children who embrace the Basic School Philosophy may be disappointed. Some young children with natural ability are held back and bored. Even the public school does a better job with gifted kids at least academically. The lower school administrator seems " anti gifted". If you can't meet or know the needs of academically gifted children, within the framework of the Basic School philosophy, just say so nicely.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 22, 2013

As a parent of a child in kindergarten this year, this school has been all that I had hoped it would be. The teachers are amazing and work so hard with my child to provide what she needs. There are excellent services available for children that need additional help. There is as much discussion with the teachers as I could possibly want and I just love walking my daughter into the school. The energy at CSD is beautiful!. Thank you CSD.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 12, 2010

This school is way to easy you don't get grades and don't have test and why can't people just send there kids to public schools!


Posted October 12, 2010

This is the most amazing, innovative, hands on learning place I have ever witnessed. The name fits well also because it truly is a community experience from Kindergarten and up. I wish every child could receive this type of educational experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 27, 2010

it is a home away from home where you always have a family around. The word 'community' doesn't even begin to express much of a community the school really is.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 27, 2010

In the words of my wonderful 7 year old 'they make dreams come true'...out of the mouths of babes!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 27, 2010

It truly is an amazing place, where love is tangible. The teachers go beyond to ignite the passion for learning.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 23, 2010

CSD is a great learning environment and the staff members foster the 'love' of learning in our children!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 19, 2010

Individualized curriculum, hands on fun, and loving teachers. What more could you ask for!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 29, 2010

To see my first grader come home from school, place rubber gloves on, grab a garbage bag and start collecting trash from the garbage cans in my house because this is what she is being taught at school says it all!! CSD recognizes that children must be not only knowledgeable but also emotionally and physically healthy, civically engaged, responsible, and caring.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 9, 2009

The staff and administration care about every child's education and overall well being. Teachers go out of their way to accomodate student's needs and make their classroom's feel safe for kids to push themselves to make them the best they can be.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 5, 2009

We love everything! Sense of community, strong values, hands-on learning... it's all awesome! Our children are being given opportunities to learn and grow that we never had. Our teachers, staff and parents are amazing people!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 2, 2009

This school is the way that all schools should be. The teach all aspects and really care about the students. And most students really thrive here. I wish I would have went to this school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 29, 2009

My schools teachers, admin, board of directors,parents, grandparents and friends are dedicated to teach each child to love learning and that they can make a difference in the world we live in.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 28, 2009

My son has Autism and me have had several bad experiences with other schools and not being able to provide the type of supervision and personal attention that he needs. At this school he gets incredible one on one help. We have seen a drastic improvement in his ability to communicate, even though he doesn't speak. His ability to problem solve has greatly increased and has learned how to interact with 'typical' kids very well. This is the first school that we have seen that truly looks at each kids needs and provides whatever is needed to create an atmosphere where each kid can be succesful.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 26, 2009

Awesome environment, great education....Best teachers in the world. Unbelievable what they do, better yet, what they will become...
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

96 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

96 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
90%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

97 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

97 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

101 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

101 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
94%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

101 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
90%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

101 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

101 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

100 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

100 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

102 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
93%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

102 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
93%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

102 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
-95%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Writing

The state average for Writing was 70% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students83%
Female89%
Male77%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White83%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disabilities56%
Non-disabled students89%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English83%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant83%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students72%
Female77%
Male65%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged73%
Students with disabilities44%
Non-disabled students78%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English72%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant72%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students73%
Female75%
Male70%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White75%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged73%
Students with disabilities25%
Non-disabled students83%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English73%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant73%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students65%
Female70%
Male58%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White70%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged65%
Students with disabilities25%
Non-disabled students73%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English65%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant65%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students74%
Female74%
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White76%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged74%
Students with disabilities53%
Non-disabled students79%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English74%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant74%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students62%
Female65%
Male60%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White64%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged62%
Students with disabilities32%
Non-disabled students70%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English62%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant62%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students53%
Female54%
Male51%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White55%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged53%
Students with disabilities26%
Non-disabled students59%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English53%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant53%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students60%
Female56%
Male65%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White61%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged62%
Students with disabilities33%
Non-disabled students64%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English60%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant60%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students75%
Female74%
Male77%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White75%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilities50%
Non-disabled students79%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English75%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant75%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students83%
Female81%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White83%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disabilities57%
Non-disabled students87%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English83%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant83%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students87%
Female86%
Male88%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White88%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilities43%
Non-disabled students94%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English87%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant87%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students73%
Female70%
Male76%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White75%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged75%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students75%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English73%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant73%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students67%
Female76%
Male57%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White67%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged67%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students70%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English67%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant67%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students-95%
Female94%
Male-95%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White-95%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged-95%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students-95%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English-95%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant-95%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

124 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

113 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

111 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 82% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology

The state average for Biology was 83% in 2012.

61 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
93%
Civics and Economics

The state average for Civics and Economics was 80% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
English I

The state average for English I was 83% in 2012.

105 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
92%
Physical Science

The state average for Physical Science was 77% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
United States History

The state average for United States History was 82% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students77%
Female79%
Male74%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilities30%
Non-disabled students86%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English76%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant77%
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Students86%
Female86%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged87%
Students with disabilities71%
Non-disabled students88%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English86%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant86%
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Students80%
Female86%
Male73%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White84%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged80%
Students with disabilities42%
Non-disabled students85%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English80%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant80%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 87% 52%
Black 4% 26%
Hispanic 4% 14%
Two or more races 4% 4%
Asian 1% 3%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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404 Armour Street
Davidson, NC 28036
Website: Click here
Phone: (704) 897-8061

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