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Maureen Joy Charter School

Charter | K-8 | 310 students

 
 

Living in Durham

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $169,300. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $820.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 4 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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12 reviews of this school


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Posted October 25, 2013

Both of my children attend Maureen Joy. This is their first year. I have not had any problems with the school. The staff appears to be helpful and genuine. I personally do not have any negative thing or comment to say about the school. The main thing is that my kindergartener and my fourth grader love the school, and that s enough for me. I would give the school one hundred and ten percent of my support, just because of my children s opinion of Maureen Joy.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 9, 2013

My daughter's school is Maureen Joy. I was very impressed with the school's reputation under Ms Barbee. However, since new management of this school, it has declined in the quality of the education provided. My daughter started out as one of the highest achievers in her class, but with poor teacher student ratios and inexperienced teaching staff - my daughter has stopped participating in class and stopped completing homework assignments. I am deeply disappointed in the current direction of Maureen Joy charter school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 7, 2013

My daughter is currently in 2nd grade and has gone to Maureen Joy since Kindergarten. The school has periodic Parent/Teacher conferences and daily agenda comments to and from teachers. Parents are welcome to come and observe classes (but not interrupt learning time). I have called, emailed, and texted my child's teacher on different occasions and these communications have always been welcomed. Some teachers have advance degrees and they all have exceeded my expectation. The school has been wonderful for us so far. Some may find it strict due to the uniform and merit/demerit system, but the children seem to be very respectful and know that there are high expectations for behavior and learning. Along with the expectations is what feels like a sincere level of care for the kids. Each one of my daughter's teachers has taken extra time with her to make sure she is getting what she needs in class. I was not sure what to expect when my daughter started school, but I am very glad she ended up at Maureen Joy.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 12, 2013

This School does not allow parents to have parent teacher conferences, the teachers can fail your child and mistreat your child and nothing is done about it. Some of the teachers treat children with favoritism so if they like your child they give them good grades if not they get an "F." Also they give your child a demerit for simple stuff like dropping a pencil or answering a question without raising your hand first. even if the child forgets by accident. It's called talking out of turn. Do not send your child to this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 6, 2010

Both my 1st and 7th grade boys attend MJCS. This is their 2nd year. This is my oldest's 2nd charter school. He has been in the same charter school since kindergarten. So I am used to the charter schools financial limitations. MJCS does what it can with what is has. I appreciate that they focus more of their finances on education than on extracurricular activities. However, this coming school year-2010/2011-they plan on adding more of those activities. Though I may not agree with everything or all choices a school makes... I will encounter that anywhere. If the only negative people have to say about the school is in regards to them not liking the school lunches then I consider that a positive. I did read one comment where someone mentioned that the science teacher does not teach... their were some issues but they have been resolved. That teacher is no longer at the school. I would recommend MJCS to any parent and I have done so. Based on my recommendation, some of my family has enrolled their children at MJCS! Go Jaguars!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 4, 2009

my child has been a student of Maureen Joy since the 4th grade now a 7th grader. The school faulty works very hard to help the student achieve. Any misbehavior is dealt with quickly and fairly. Being a special needs child the staff always assist her and she is excelling in her reading and math scores are on the raise. I thank the staff for working with us and if Maureen Joy could go to the 12th it would be and assist to her and other students
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 23, 2009

My child also hates this school. there are no lockers for middle school, no labs, extracurricular activities and the school lunch is awful and the school is under a bad influence


Posted October 22, 2008

This is my childs second year at this school, I eally like Maureen Joy and would recommend it to everyone, the classes are small and the are only teo classes per grade which gives the teachers and staff the oppertunity to address each childs needs, Dr Stien is a wonderful school dirertor and if their is a problem that you need address, he will take care of it, No there is not much extra curricular activities but there is not much funding for the charter school, so they have to pick and choose what more important, such as tutoring for children that need it so they can excel.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 11, 2008

my child hates this school there are not any extra curricular activities and the school lunch is horrible this school should be shut down.The science teacher doe not even teach


Posted August 30, 2007

This school is the most awesome school here in Durham.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 1, 2007

My child has been a student at Maureen Joy Charter School since the second grade. She will in the eighth grade next school year. I have been very impressed with the class sizes and the teachers interest in the student totally. The staff has always been very professional and courteous to me. The school holds the student accountable when they misbehave in class, fail to turn in homework ,or have performed in a positive way,very impressive. If there was a ninth grade added I would readily send her there again. Mr Stern the new principal is 'Top Brass' and demands and expects all students to succeed. Hats off to him and the staff at the school. Thanks for allowing my child to attend and we look forward to the next school year. Denelda Walls
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 16, 2007

This school is an ok school.This school offers good education and let the children excell in different ways.The teachers are loving and they care about the students.No descrimination,nothing. I really injoyed my family going to this school ~a special person~
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

34 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

34 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
29%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
60%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

41 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
49%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
66%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

41 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
24%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
59%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
34%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
64%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
18%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
56%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
59%

2010

 
 
32%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

35 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
92%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

35 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
69%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

34 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
82%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

34 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
61%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
19%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
91%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
36%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
78%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
83%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students44%
Female44%
Male46%
Black29%
Asiann/a
Hispanic67%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged47%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students50%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English40%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant44%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students29%
Female22%
Male46%
Black29%
Asiann/a
Hispanic25%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged30%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students33%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English32%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant29%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students49%
Female59%
Male29%
Black53%
Asiann/a
Hispanic40%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged47%
Not economically disadvantaged55%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students57%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English51%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant49%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students24%
Female33%
Male7%
Black23%
Asiann/a
Hispanic20%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged17%
Not economically disadvantaged46%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students29%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English26%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant24%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students34%
Female26%
Male43%
Black29%
Asiann/a
Hispanic36%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged38%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students34%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English35%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant34%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students18%
Female17%
Male19%
Black14%
Asiann/a
Hispanic14%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged19%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students20%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English20%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant18%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students57%
Female52%
Male62%
Black54%
Asiann/a
Hispanic57%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged60%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students59%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English55%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant57%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students43%
Female53%
Male31%
Black33%
Asiann/a
Hispanic60%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged43%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students44%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English46%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant43%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students43%
Female53%
Male31%
Black33%
Asiann/a
Hispanic70%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged39%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students44%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English42%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant43%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students21%
Female20%
Male21%
Black15%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged17%
Not economically disadvantaged27%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students23%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English21%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant21%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students21%
Female25%
Male14%
Black15%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged22%
Not economically disadvantaged18%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students23%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English21%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant21%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students19%
Female21%
Male17%
Black22%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged22%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students21%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English21%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant19%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students36%
Female37%
Male33%
Black35%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged37%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students38%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English38%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant36%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students68%
Female74%
Male58%
Black65%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged70%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students72%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English69%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant68%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

13 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students54%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged55%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students54%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English54%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant54%
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 67% 26%
Hispanic 29% 14%
Two or more races 2% 4%
White 2% 52%
American Indian 1% 1%
Asian 0% 3%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 83%N/A50%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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107 South Driver St
Durham, NC 27703
Website: Click here
Phone: (919) 493-6056

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