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GreatSchools Rating

Kestrel Heights School

Charter | K-12 | 1065 students

 
 

Living in Durham

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $186,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $853.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 15 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

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47 reviews of this school


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Posted January 29, 2014

This is our first year at Kestrel Elementary. We could not be happier with the education that our daughter has received so far. She has blossomed so much in the last 6 months or so, and we contribute most of that to her teachers. What I love about the school are the "4 R's that they live by: Respect your environment, Respect Yourself, Responsibility, and Respect others! If our children live by these they will grow into caring individuals who care for their enviroments and others. We also adore their teachers. They are so loving and caring, and not just my child's teachers, all of the teachers in the elementary school treat her like their own student. When she is upset they comfort her. They are truly all like family! We could not be happier! Not to mention...she is learning so much! : )
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 4, 2014

I am a student at Kestrel Heights School. I have been going there since the sixth grade and I am now in tenth grade . Although the middle school has had some staff changes, I think it is excellent. The high school is another story. There are only a few good teachers and even the good teachers don't teach advance material. The high school lacks AP and Honors courses because of the lack of staff. The principal doesn't do much to improve the school. The school lacks a cafeteria and an auditorium because of budget problems. The school lacks advanced technology and most of the computers are old or broken. The outdoor environment looks bad. The landscape isn't good and needs work. They also have a bug problem that they never fix. I plan to leave the school after this school year if I can find a better school. Personally I would put my child at the middle school and take them out after eighth grade otherwise your child might be bored and they won't receive the help they need to get into a good college.


Posted December 23, 2013

I have two children at Kestrel Elementary, and we love it there. The teachers are excellent, the special education teachers are outstanding, and my children are thriving. We considered many other schools (private, traditional public, magnet, and charter) before choosing Kestrel, and we definitely made the right choice. The school is small, and the staff all know my children and family.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 17, 2013

The middle and high school are excellent! I highly recommend them, but the elementary school still needs some work. We transferred our child after a year and a half at the school. Not happy with the teachers there. We had a child there for middle school and is currently in her 2nd year at the high school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 12, 2013

Great School! We have two girls here, elementary and high school. We've been part of the Kestrel family for 4 years. We love the warm, nurturing, peaceful environment, caring teachers and staff, ease of communication,regular updates, diversity among student population and staff. We wouldn't want my girls anywhere else!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 16, 2013

We have been in the new elementary school for over a year now. Last year our son was in the 2nd grade. We were not impressed with the second grade teacher at all; however, the principal was very responsive and worked with us as parents and the teacher so we could find some common ground. This year, in 3rd grade, we are much happier. The primary teacher is excellent and the special teachers are very good. Kestrel is a small school. Everyone knows our names. The elementary school is brand new and is still figuring some things out. I think the school will be excellent with a few more years under its belt.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 29, 2013

Our son started at Kestrel Elementary last year in the 5th grade and has now moved in to Kestrel Middle school. Last year, being the first year of the Elementary school was a bit shaky at times as the teachers worked the kinks out, but it was clear the teachers were doing their best and truly cared about the kids. This year in the Middle School we have absolutely fallen in love with Kestrel. The teachers are some of the best I've ever seen and the way they have divided up the core classes, alternating two each day for two hours, verses all 4 each day for one hour, has made a HUGE difference in how my ADHD child is performing. So impressed with all of the teachers, their methods and the absolute dedication to helping each student succeed. I can't say enough good things at the Middle School.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 28, 2013

So far, we have had an entirely positive experience at Kestrel Elementary School. We have found the teacher superb, the quality of instruction and curriculum very high and both of our kids are thriving. We are into our second year and could not be more pleased!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 28, 2013

It is a school where students can excell at their own pace and in their own individual way!!


Posted October 28, 2013

Small class size, great teachers/staff, great diversity and parent involvement all make this school top notch!! The teachers are very responsive and work with each student to help them reach their highest potential. The emphasis is on developing critical thinking skills and good citizenship. Kestrel really does feel like a private school education minus the tuition bill. We feel very fortunate to be part of this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 28, 2013

I like the small, intimate nature of this school. The teachers truly care about the students' success, and the academic standards are high. The elementary school is new last year, and there have been a few kinks with working out the logistics, but so far this year is much smoother than last year. Overall, very few complaints, and a very dedicated staff and teaching faculty.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 28, 2013

I have a first grader and my child loves this school. This school has great diversity. The teachers are great and really care about the kids. The Elementary school is in the 2nd year now, it has had its ups and downs, but thanks to the hard work and dedication of the fabulous teachers and great parent involvement my child has thrived. I expect that Kestrel will continue to get better and better and am so glad that my child has this opportunity to grow up in such a great learning environment.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 28, 2013

Kestrel is a great school. We love the small class sizes, and the smaller school feel. Teachers and staff are awesome. My daughter is doing very well so far, and is always happy to go to school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 24, 2013

We have enjoyed Kestrel thus far. The school is quite diverse and offers many options for our 5th grader to grow academically!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 3, 2013

This is a terrific school! To be honest, the only difference between KHS and a private school is that they do not collect tuition. We are starting our second year and have had an amazing experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 2, 2013

kestrel heights middle school really good school. Very nice teachers and classes Also the parent to teacher communication is amazing. Keep it up kestrel
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 11, 2013

Three of three children have attended middle school here and we could not be more pleased. Highly recommend. If the elementary school had been around when they were younger they would have attended there as well. When they completed Kestrel Middle School they were more than ready for high school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 17, 2011

This school is great I have a sixth and eighth grader and one that graduated last year the middle school and the High school both are great and you won't find any better in durham.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 20, 2011

We love this school. The academics, teachers, and family feel makes this school top notched. We have never experienced a school where everyone has every child's best interest at heart. This school is by far the best thing to happen to the Triangle area. Totally recommend this school to those who are looking for a school that will put your child first.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 13, 2010

Great School! Best middle school in Durham! They do more for kids with less money then the traditional schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
40%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

69 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

69 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

69 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

98 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

98 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
88%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

101 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

101 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
76%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

98 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
80%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

98 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
79%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

97 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Writing

The state average for Writing was 70% in 2011.

62 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
77%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students48%
Female46%
Male49%
Black24%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White64%
Economically disadvantaged18%
Not economically disadvantaged54%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students50%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English48%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant48%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students41%
Female50%
Male34%
Black12%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White61%
Economically disadvantaged27%
Not economically disadvantaged44%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students44%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English41%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant41%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students44%
Female39%
Male49%
Black29%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White64%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged46%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students50%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English45%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant44%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students40%
Female46%
Male34%
Black32%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White55%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged38%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students44%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English40%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant40%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students58%
Female53%
Male64%
Black46%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged62%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students59%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English63%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant58%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students46%
Female39%
Male55%
Black27%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White58%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged52%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students48%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English50%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant46%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students51%
Female42%
Male61%
Black27%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged57%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students51%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English55%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant51%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students42%
Female48%
Male38%
Black27%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White62%
Economically disadvantaged17%
Not economically disadvantaged45%
Students with disabilities11%
Non-disabled students49%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English43%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant42%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students52%
Female55%
Male50%
Black39%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White68%
Economically disadvantaged33%
Not economically disadvantaged55%
Students with disabilities16%
Non-disabled students61%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English54%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant52%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students43%
Female48%
Male38%
Black12%
Asian90%
Hispanic25%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White75%
Economically disadvantaged30%
Not economically disadvantaged44%
Students with disabilities9%
Non-disabled students47%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English43%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant43%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students57%
Female63%
Male53%
Black38%
Asian90%
Hispanic33%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White81%
Economically disadvantaged20%
Not economically disadvantaged62%
Students with disabilities9%
Non-disabled students63%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English59%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant57%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students33%
Female29%
Male36%
Black18%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White44%
Economically disadvantaged-5%
Not economically disadvantaged37%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students35%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English33%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant33%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students45%
Female51%
Male38%
Black23%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White67%
Economically disadvantaged17%
Not economically disadvantaged49%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students46%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English46%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant45%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students54%
Female52%
Male55%
Black35%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White71%
Economically disadvantaged33%
Not economically disadvantaged57%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students56%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English55%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant54%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

120 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
23%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
70%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

67 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
28%
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 82% in 2011.

66 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
53%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 83% in 2012.

67 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
81%
Civics and Economics

The state average for Civics and Economics was 80% in 2011.

67 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
69%
English I

The state average for English I was 83% in 2012.

84 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
77%
Physical Science

The state average for Physical Science was 77% in 2011.

37 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
43%
United States History

The state average for United States History was 82% in 2011.

48 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
54%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students23%
Female23%
Male24%
Black11%
Asiann/a
Hispanic6%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White40%
Economically disadvantaged9%
Not economically disadvantaged25%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students28%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English24%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant23%
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Students28%
Female32%
Male25%
Black20%
Asiann/a
Hispanic17%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White53%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged30%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students35%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English29%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant28%
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Students43%
Female60%
Male27%
Black39%
Asiann/a
Hispanic20%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White62%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged44%
Students with disabilities15%
Non-disabled students49%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English44%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant43%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 44% 26%
White 39% 52%
Hispanic 9% 14%
Asian 4% 3%
Two or more races 3% 4%
American Indian 1% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

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What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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4700 South Alston Ave.
Durham, NC 27713
Website: Click here
Phone: (919) 484-1300

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